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  • 「8.8」DIY Laser Module

    You're welcome. Note that the inductor should be sized so that its saturation current is at least twice that of the output current. For the circuit as shown, an inductor saturation current of around 1A should be fine. Selection of the output capacitors is also important. C5 will be a 1uF multilayer ceramic, and C2 should be a low ESR capacitor. If you want to use a more powerful laser diode, you will need to select a better inductor (as above) and you will need to select a different diode for D2, The SS26 schottky diode has a current rating of 2A, which should be fine for output currents up to 1A. If you want the circuit to output more current than this, D2 will have to have a higher current rating.

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  • 「8.8」DIY Laser Module

    Try this:

    First you need a 1600mW laser diode :) You would need to change the value of R3 to change the output current for the 1600mW diode. The regulator is capable of driving 5A, but the board layout has no heatsinking (the regulator might overheat) and I have no idea how much current the SM1 controller can supply.

    I've reverse engineered this layout, and the RJ45 pin connections appear to be:Pin 1 Vcc (24v I think)Pin 3 /EnablePin 5 Module IDPin 7 GndThe enable pin is either open circuit (laser off) or ground (laser on), and the module ID pin is a 150 ohm resistor to ground.

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  • Anodizing Metal at Home (The LJS Method)

    I did some home anodising a few years ago with good results. I used battery acid (sulfuric acid) in the electrolyte. To get a good finish, you need to keep everything squeaky clean - and preferably use de-ionised water. The parts need to be completely degreased before you put them in the anodising bath as well. I also tried cleaning the parts by washing them in the dishwasher. This works, although you do wind up with an oxide layer on the surface. (You can also "anodise" aluminium by putting it in the dishwasher with a more than recommended amount of the cheapest dishwasher powder you can get - basically just plain sodium carbonate).Instead of lemon juice, I'd try citric acid (available at supermarkets). I'm also keen to give acetic acid a go. Definitely use the geapest white vi…

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    I did some home anodising a few years ago with good results. I used battery acid (sulfuric acid) in the electrolyte. To get a good finish, you need to keep everything squeaky clean - and preferably use de-ionised water. The parts need to be completely degreased before you put them in the anodising bath as well. I also tried cleaning the parts by washing them in the dishwasher. This works, although you do wind up with an oxide layer on the surface. (You can also "anodise" aluminium by putting it in the dishwasher with a more than recommended amount of the cheapest dishwasher powder you can get - basically just plain sodium carbonate).Instead of lemon juice, I'd try citric acid (available at supermarkets). I'm also keen to give acetic acid a go. Definitely use the geapest white vinegar you can get, because it's just acetic acid and water. Apple cider, white wine and red wine vinegar have other impurities in them. Worth trying the different types though, may give you some interesting effects.

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  • Making a Graver and Template Set for Engraving

    Nice instructable. Just a note on tool steels. High carbon tool steel will hold its edge better than high speed steel (HSS) in this application. Note here that I'm talking about high carbon, cold work tool steels such as O1 or W1, not "carbon" steel sold at steel merchants, which is in reality a low carbon mild steel that will never harden no matter how you heat and quench it. If you can cut it with a file, it's either mild steel or a higher carbon steel in its annealed state. Hardened high carbon tool steel will skate off a file, and will take the teeth off the file if you get persistent. Files are made from high carbon tool steel. O1 and W1 steel is usually quite a bit cheaper than HSS as well, although you will have to heat treat it yourself to harden it.There is a common myt…

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    Nice instructable. Just a note on tool steels. High carbon tool steel will hold its edge better than high speed steel (HSS) in this application. Note here that I'm talking about high carbon, cold work tool steels such as O1 or W1, not "carbon" steel sold at steel merchants, which is in reality a low carbon mild steel that will never harden no matter how you heat and quench it. If you can cut it with a file, it's either mild steel or a higher carbon steel in its annealed state. Hardened high carbon tool steel will skate off a file, and will take the teeth off the file if you get persistent. Files are made from high carbon tool steel. O1 and W1 steel is usually quite a bit cheaper than HSS as well, although you will have to heat treat it yourself to harden it.There is a common myth that HSS is harder and better wearing than carbon tool steel. This is ONLY true in high speed machining operations (lathing, milling, sawing etc., hence its name). The reason HSS is chosen over carbon tool steel in these applications is that it holds its edge better at the elevated temperatures that come with high speed machining. Carbon steel tempers and loses its hardness above around 200 degrees celcius, where high speed steels are good up to around 600 degrees. Carbide tools are able to withstand much higher temperatures, but are brittle and prone to fracture if misused. HSS has pretty much been replaced by carbide inserts in manufacturing these days because they are better wearing, run at higher speeds, and are quick and simple to replace - just replace the insert (seconds) instead of regrinding the tool (tens of minutes).If you get hold of some W1 tool steel in an appropriate size, you can use this (pretty damn awesome) technique to get the basic shape fairly quickly using a file, harden it, then finish it using the diamond plates. Note that while you can heat treat HSS at home, you will need to invest a lot of time, effort and money onto a setup that will replicate the complicated heat treatment process that is required to get good hardness. https://lkalloy.com/what-is-the-difference-between-high-speed-steel-tool-steel-and-carbide-steel/

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  • How To: Create an Android App With Android Studio to Control LED

    Hi. Great tutorial. do you have any plans to update this for Android Studio 3.0+? the user interface for the later versions of AS is quite different. That said, I went through the "getting started" tutorial in AS, and I think I can now make this work in the new version.

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  • mrwolfe's instructable Eco-friendly Firelighters's weekly stats:
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  • Just a note on safety.This project deals with mains power, and I strongly advise you to follow the international conventions for wire colours. Also be very careful when wiring mains power that the wires are connected correctly. At best, a wiring error will result in a small explosion and a bright blue flash, at worst you could electrocute yourself. Having shaken hands with the devil a few times myself, I can assure you that it's not a good thing to do.The European/international convention for wire colours is:Brown - Active (Red is no longer used)Blue - Neutral (Black is no longer used)Green/yellow stripe - Earth (Plain green us no longer used)In North America, the convention is:Black - ActiveWhite - NeutralGreen or Green/yellow stripe - EarthIt is very bad practice to use green co…

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    Just a note on safety.This project deals with mains power, and I strongly advise you to follow the international conventions for wire colours. Also be very careful when wiring mains power that the wires are connected correctly. At best, a wiring error will result in a small explosion and a bright blue flash, at worst you could electrocute yourself. Having shaken hands with the devil a few times myself, I can assure you that it's not a good thing to do.The European/international convention for wire colours is:Brown - Active (Red is no longer used)Blue - Neutral (Black is no longer used)Green/yellow stripe - Earth (Plain green us no longer used)In North America, the convention is:Black - ActiveWhite - NeutralGreen or Green/yellow stripe - EarthIt is very bad practice to use green coloured wire for any other function than ground in mains wiring.Note that the wires going through the relay contacts do not have to be different colours, this is AC we are dealing with, so direction through the relay is irrelevant. If you must use different colours for the mains wires going to the relay, I suggest you use red or orange for active.

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  • I got a "slmgr is not recognised as an internal or external command" error. To fix it, go to c:/windows/system32 and rename slmgr.vbs.removewat to slmgr.vbs

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