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  • Servicing an Aqualisa Aquavalve 605/405 Shower Controller

    There is another instructable showing a similar cartridge repair:https://www.instructables.com/id/Servicing-an-Aqualisa-Aquavalve-605405-Thermostati/

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  • Servicing an Aqualisa Aquavalve 605/405 Shower Controller

    Thank you for your interest. Unfortunately I tackled this maintenance many years ago and just did it on my own shower at home. So I don't have the controller any more.I hope you are successful, best wishes.

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    • 3d Printed Lathe Toolpost Drill for Myford ML10
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    • Arduino Auto Formatting Listings
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  • Lathe Spindle Handle for a Myford ML10

    Hmm. I have not had any problems with mine. Obviously, make sure the business end is wiped dry of oil. I'm guessing that the angle of taper will affect the outward clamping force, but this will already have been set when you made it. I have put some bicycle inner tube around the tightening knob so that I can make sure it is well tightened ( it then needs a good bang with a rubber mallet to release the grip after it has been in use).If it is not really usable, perhaps put some saw cuts around the circumference of the part which grips the spindle when it expands (saw cuts parallel to the main axis of the lathe - ie at right angles to the slipping motion). This might be a bit drastic, but it should help by giving some sharp edges to help grip, and by reducing the surface area which is in con…

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    Hmm. I have not had any problems with mine. Obviously, make sure the business end is wiped dry of oil. I'm guessing that the angle of taper will affect the outward clamping force, but this will already have been set when you made it. I have put some bicycle inner tube around the tightening knob so that I can make sure it is well tightened ( it then needs a good bang with a rubber mallet to release the grip after it has been in use).If it is not really usable, perhaps put some saw cuts around the circumference of the part which grips the spindle when it expands (saw cuts parallel to the main axis of the lathe - ie at right angles to the slipping motion). This might be a bit drastic, but it should help by giving some sharp edges to help grip, and by reducing the surface area which is in contact with the spindle, hence increasing the outward force applied to the spindle.I suppose making the outer surface of the tapered plug (the plug which is pulled into the assembly to produce the force) as smooth as possible, will enable it to slip more easily into the assembly and hence produce a bigger clamping force. Likewise, making sure that the bore it slides into is as smooth as possible will also help. Perhaps attack these areas with progressively finer sandpaper (perhaps up to 1000 or 4000) followed by a polish with metal polish (etc).Let us know how you get on.

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  • DIY ECG EKG Portable Heart Monitor

    Hi there. Thanks for your interest.It looks as though you do not have the graphics library installed in your Arduino setup.It's a little while since I have done any Arduino stuff, so can't quite remember where the header files are installed, but a quick Google should let you know where.I think the source of the files is at:https://github.com/adafruit/Adafruit-GFX-LibraryClick on the "Clone or Download" button then "Download Zip". This will download the whole library onto your computer downloads folder. I think you can install the lot in your Arduino setup. When you recompile your (my) Arduino sketch it should then find the header file (Adafruit_GFX.h) and include it, hopefully finishing compiling correctly.Let us know how you get on. Best wishes

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  • Stripping a Myford ML10 Lathe (Speed 10) Headstock - Taper Roller Bearings

    A brilliant comment - many thanks. Pleased everything came out fine in the end.Best wishes

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  • Dismantling a Brook Crompton AC Motor (from a Myford Lathe)

    I only have experience of this one motor, but I would think that my Instructable about wiring up this motor, should answer most of your questions about wiring up your own. As I understand it, the basic motor will run in either direction quite happily ONCE IT HAS BEEN STARTED UP. Hence, to reverse the direction of operation, you only have to swap over the two wires connected to the starting winding (Labelled T and Z on my motor). These should be easy to identify - I think you have the same labelled PCB as mine, so you can find the T and Z wires as they disappear into the guts of the motor (on mine, the wires were coloured blue and yellow). If you dismantle the motor, you could check again, as the circuit that these two wires feed will have the centrifugal switch in it.https://www.instructa…

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    I only have experience of this one motor, but I would think that my Instructable about wiring up this motor, should answer most of your questions about wiring up your own. As I understand it, the basic motor will run in either direction quite happily ONCE IT HAS BEEN STARTED UP. Hence, to reverse the direction of operation, you only have to swap over the two wires connected to the starting winding (Labelled T and Z on my motor). These should be easy to identify - I think you have the same labelled PCB as mine, so you can find the T and Z wires as they disappear into the guts of the motor (on mine, the wires were coloured blue and yellow). If you dismantle the motor, you could check again, as the circuit that these two wires feed will have the centrifugal switch in it.https://www.instructables.com/id/Wiring-up-a-Brooke-Crompton-single-phase-lathe-mot/Remember - be safe, these are mains voltages; always have a suitable fuse in the plug (eg 3A) and an easily accessible on/off switch.

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  • Stripping a Myford ML10 Lathe (Speed 10) Headstock - Taper Roller Bearings

    Many thanks for the comment. Many years on since I did this job and everything on the lathe still seems to be fine.

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  • DIY ECG EKG Portable Heart Monitor

    I'm trying to reply, but I keep getting error messages.

    Hi. I used a "2.2 SPI TFT LCD ILI9341" and these are available on eBay for £5 (GBP), they have a resolution of 240x320px. Your "TFT-LCD-ST7735" looks to be a smaller series of displays (the 0.96" one only has a resolution of 80x160, the 1.8" one looks like a 128x160px resolution).There are 2.4" and 2.8" versions of my display on eBay both with 240x320 resolution for a little more money than the 2.2" version. I don't think I would go with a smaller resolution than 240x320. If you stick with ILI9431 display, then the arduino software I link to should work without alteration (you will need the ILI9431 library installed on your PC in order to compile the code).There is an overview of the circuit in Step 1 and a more detailed circuit diagram in Step…

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    Hi. I used a "2.2 SPI TFT LCD ILI9341" and these are available on eBay for £5 (GBP), they have a resolution of 240x320px. Your "TFT-LCD-ST7735" looks to be a smaller series of displays (the 0.96" one only has a resolution of 80x160, the 1.8" one looks like a 128x160px resolution).There are 2.4" and 2.8" versions of my display on eBay both with 240x320 resolution for a little more money than the 2.2" version. I don't think I would go with a smaller resolution than 240x320. If you stick with ILI9431 display, then the arduino software I link to should work without alteration (you will need the ILI9431 library installed on your PC in order to compile the code).There is an overview of the circuit in Step 1 and a more detailed circuit diagram in Step 2 and the PCB track layout is ready to print onto a transparency as a PDF in Step 3. However, you do really need to have a little bit of background in these electronics modules to make this device. I would highlight what I said in the introduction:This is not intended to be a full, step-by-step guide. I think you really have to know a little bit about what you are doing in each area listed above. I will try to give enough information to give people the confidence to have a go. There is nothing particularly hard here. This is not a finished, polished piece of kit - more a fully-working prototype.I designed the circuit in KiCad, but the learning curve is steep and the PCB design relies on several footprints which I designed (as I couldn't find readily available ones). The whole set of footprints, libraries, and files is a bit of a nightmare in KiCad, so would be very hard to package up and supply via the internet.I really treated this project as a learning exercise and made various mistakes along the way. I 'honed' my abilities in 3D printing, PCB design and manufacture, Circuit design, Arduino code, electrode use, etc, etc. I got each element sorted one-at-a-time in a simple way, then brought two elements together, then three, etc, until the whole project was finished. I think you may have to treat the project in a similar way.I hope you are successful. Let me know if there is anything else I can help on.Best wishes

    Hi. I used a "2.2 SPI TFT LCD ILI9341" and these are available on eBay for £5 (GBP), they have a resolution of 240x320px. Your "TFT-LCD-ST7735" looks to be a smaller series of displays (the 0.96" one only has a resolution of 80x160, the 1.8" one looks like a 128x160px resolution).There are 2.4" and 2.8" versions of my display on eBay both with 240x320 resolution for a little more money than the 2.2" version. I don't think I would go with a smaller resolution than 240x320. If you stick with ILI9431 display, then the arduino software I link to should work without alteration (you will need the ILI9431 library installed on your PC in order to compile the code).There is an overview of the circuit in Step 1 and a more detailed circuit diagram in Step…

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    Hi. I used a "2.2 SPI TFT LCD ILI9341" and these are available on eBay for £5 (GBP), they have a resolution of 240x320px. Your "TFT-LCD-ST7735" looks to be a smaller series of displays (the 0.96" one only has a resolution of 80x160, the 1.8" one looks like a 128x160px resolution).There are 2.4" and 2.8" versions of my display on eBay both with 240x320 resolution for a little more money than the 2.2" version. I don't think I would go with a smaller resolution than 240x320. If you stick with ILI9431 display, then the arduino software I link to should work without alteration (you will need the ILI9431 library installed on your PC in order to compile the code).There is an overview of the circuit in Step 1 and a more detailed circuit diagram in Step 2 and the PCB track layout is ready to print onto a transparency as a PDF in Step 3. However, you do really need to have a little bit of background in these electronics modules to make this device. I would highlight what I said in the introduction:This is not intended to be a full, step-by-step guide. I think you really have to know a little bit about what you are doing in each area listed above. I will try to give enough information to give people the confidence to have a go. There is nothing particularly hard here. This is not a finished, polished piece of kit - more a fully-working prototype.I designed the circuit in KiCad, but the learning curve is steep and the PCB design relies on several footprints which I designed (as I couldn't find readily available ones). The whole set of footprints, libraries, and files is a bit of a nightmare in KiCad, so would be very hard to package up and supply via the internet.I really treated this project as a learning exercise and made various mistakes along the way. I 'honed' my abilities in 3D printing, PCB design and manufacture, Circuit design, Arduino code, electrode use, etc, etc. I got each element sorted one-at-a-time in a simple way, then brought two elements together, then three, etc, until the whole project was finished. I think you may have to treat the project in a similar way.I hope you are successful. Let me know if there is anything else I can help on.Best wishes

    Hi. I used a "2.2 SPI TFT LCD ILI9341" and these are available on eBay for £5 (GBP), they have a resolution of 240x320px. Your "TFT-LCD-ST7735" looks to be a smaller series of displays (the 0.96" one only has a resolution of 80x160, the 1.8" one looks like a 128x160px resolution).There are 2.4" and 2.8" versions of my display on eBay both with 240x320 resolution for a little more money than the 2.2" version. I don't think I would go with a smaller resolution than 240x320. If you stick with ILI9431 display, then the arduino software I link to should work without alteration (you will need the ILI9431 library installed on your PC in order to compile the code).There is an overview of the circuit in Step 1 and a more detailed circuit diagram in Step…

    see more »

    Hi. I used a "2.2 SPI TFT LCD ILI9341" and these are available on eBay for £5 (GBP), they have a resolution of 240x320px. Your "TFT-LCD-ST7735" looks to be a smaller series of displays (the 0.96" one only has a resolution of 80x160, the 1.8" one looks like a 128x160px resolution).There are 2.4" and 2.8" versions of my display on eBay both with 240x320 resolution for a little more money than the 2.2" version. I don't think I would go with a smaller resolution than 240x320. If you stick with ILI9431 display, then the arduino software I link to should work without alteration (you will need the ILI9431 library installed on your PC in order to compile the code).There is an overview of the circuit in Step 1 and a more detailed circuit diagram in Step 2 and the PCB track layout is ready to print onto a transparency as a PDF in Step 3. However, you do really need to have a little bit of background in these electronics modules to make this device. I would highlight what I said in the introduction:This is not intended to be a full, step-by-step guide. I think you really have to know a little bit about what you are doing in each area listed above. I will try to give enough information to give people the confidence to have a go. There is nothing particularly hard here. This is not a finished, polished piece of kit - more a fully-working prototype.I designed the circuit in KiCad, but the learning curve is steep and the PCB design relies on several footprints which I designed (as I couldn't find readily available ones). The whole set of footprints, libraries, and files is a bit of a nightmare in KiCad, so would be very hard to package up and supply via the internet.I really treated this project as a learning exercise and made various mistakes along the way. I 'honed' my abilities in 3D printing, PCB design and manufacture, Circuit design, Arduino code, electrode use, etc, etc. I got each element sorted one-at-a-time in a simple way, then brought two elements together, then three, etc, until the whole project was finished. I think you may have to treat the project in a similar way.I hope you are successful. Let me know if there is anything else I can help on.Best wishes

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    • JGaurora A3S Replacement LCD Board
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  • I hope Google Translate makes a good translation:"The Sonoff wireless switch can be controlled from the Google Home or Alexa. This instructable was all about adding the wireless switch into a mains adapter to make a neat Google Home controlled mains socket.""Беспроводным коммутатором Sonoff можно управлять из Google Home или Alexa. Это было просто инструкция по добавлению беспроводного коммутатора в сетевой адаптер, чтобы сделать аккуратную управляемую розетку Google Home."

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  • Many thanks for the comment. All down to the ECG Front end from 100RandomTasks I suspect.Best wishes

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  • Nice. I like the idea of the light. I have not yet switched on the lathe with the handle in place, but at the start, I had some near misses. I now ALWAYS slip the drive belt off the pulleys whenever I use the handle - this has saved me on one or two occasions!

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  • Ahh. This is six years ago now!! I'm coming to it like new!I think that the 10k pull down resistors are necessary for the 4066 when it is used on its own, but not needed when connected to the PIC 16F88. I seem to remember that the pull-down / pull-up functionality is programmable in the 16F88 by setting a flag on each pin which is configured as an input.I think the Microchip chips are brilliant, especially for tiny, complex projects, but it is a while since I have used them and have been seduced by the Arduino products; mainly due to the ease of programming. My PIC programmers were a bit temperamental for some reason.Best wishes

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  • Following on from my main answer. The trace in this image shows how little noise there is in the signal from the ECG front end. There is no signal processing to remove noise in the software used to generate the trace. Every data sample (around about 200 per second) is plotted on the trace, with no averaging or anything. (The image full size is 538px wide by 237px high)

    This should be satisfactory I think. There is very little noise in the signal from the ECG front end, so in principle this should be fine. My slight hesitation is the fact that noise may be generated through the ground lead of the oscilloscope if the oscilloscope is connected to the mains (rather than being a battery-powered electronic oscilloscope isolated from the earth).I get lots of noise as soon as I connect any sort of mains power supply or USB 5V supply (computer-based or wall-plug) to the unit, so this is why I have concerns about the connection to the oscilloscope - I don't think the noise is anything to do with ripple on the mains-based 5V supplies, it is more likely to be earth potential issues I think. That is why I always use batteries.It is really important to have good skin…

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    This should be satisfactory I think. There is very little noise in the signal from the ECG front end, so in principle this should be fine. My slight hesitation is the fact that noise may be generated through the ground lead of the oscilloscope if the oscilloscope is connected to the mains (rather than being a battery-powered electronic oscilloscope isolated from the earth).I get lots of noise as soon as I connect any sort of mains power supply or USB 5V supply (computer-based or wall-plug) to the unit, so this is why I have concerns about the connection to the oscilloscope - I don't think the noise is anything to do with ripple on the mains-based 5V supplies, it is more likely to be earth potential issues I think. That is why I always use batteries.It is really important to have good skin contact (I have just used some old electrodes where the skin gel had dried out - terrible noise, no hint of an ECG signal - until I put a few drops of water on the electrode pads and put them back on the skin).I was very disappointed when I first connected the ECG front end up; all I got was lots of noise. There is no substitute for properly connecting a real human up to the board, using screened leads and electrodes. I don't think anything else will produce a heart trace - holding crocodile clips on the skin with sticky tape (or similar) just will not do!Finally, I have to warn about connecting a person to the ECG front end and then connecting the ECG front end to a mains-based piece of equipment. You should not do this. Nasty things could happen to the subject in the unlikely event of an equipment failure, lightning strike or other random act.I hope this helps. Best wishes.

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  • Thanks - me too. Just need 6 years at college!

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    • DIY ECG EKG Portable Heart Monitor
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  • Many thanks for your interest.Best wishes

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  • Nice - a really clear diagram. Many thanks.

    Thank you for your contribution. I'm not sure which source I got the positioning of the leads from, but I had difficulty finding an illustration to show the best location, so had suspicions that my positioning was not brilliant.I see a device called a "Holter Monitor" which I believe is a "2 lead" ECG monitor used for 24 hour monitoring. Presumably this would use the same positioning that I should use. I have attached a couple of images which seem to reflect what you say. I will adjust the Instructable to include some better information about the positioning. Thanks for your help.On your comment about the rapidity of the trace I included - unfortunately, I'm no longer very young (according to my pension documents), and I did take myself to hospital on that occasion - A…

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    Thank you for your contribution. I'm not sure which source I got the positioning of the leads from, but I had difficulty finding an illustration to show the best location, so had suspicions that my positioning was not brilliant.I see a device called a "Holter Monitor" which I believe is a "2 lead" ECG monitor used for 24 hour monitoring. Presumably this would use the same positioning that I should use. I have attached a couple of images which seem to reflect what you say. I will adjust the Instructable to include some better information about the positioning. Thanks for your help.On your comment about the rapidity of the trace I included - unfortunately, I'm no longer very young (according to my pension documents), and I did take myself to hospital on that occasion - Atrial Flutter apparently. Different to the Atrial Fibrillation I am more used to! I don't think I am alone. The UK's wonderful National Health System is sorting me out at no charge!

    Sorry - source of the two diagrams:https://www.rch.org.au/rchcpg/hospital_clinical_gu...http://www.heart-health.ca/faq.aspx

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  • DIY ECG EKG Portable Heart Monitor

    Thanks for your interest. I have just taken my meter to the Audio leads I used and can not read any resistance on any of the scales. So mine have not got any attenuation built in. I would have thought that any resistance between the signal lead and Ground would reduce the perceived signal voltage for the operational amplifier on the input. The circuitry for the front-end is published by 100RandomTasks if that helps - see attachment.

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  • saabaus, you are right. The worry is about mains voltages accidentally finding their way through to the ECG due to a fault condition (very unlikely I know). However, the path via the electrodes is directly across the heart - and the electrodes purposely give a very low resistance. Imagine the effect of 230V on the heart, when the voltages we are reading are a few thousandths of a volt (mV)In any case, any mains equipment (even just being nearby) swamps out the signal we are interested in due to stray pick up of voltages.Many thanks for your interest.

    I'm pleased you found it interesting. It was pleasing for me, because it involved so many different types of task. Best wishes

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  • Many thanks. Appreciated.

    Muito obrigado por seu interesse. Algo semelhante deve ser feito comercialmente por um custo muito baixo.(Many thanks for your interest. Something similar should be able to be made commercially for a very small cost.)

    Yep. It happens for a few hours separated by weeks or months. I have my monitor ready to go!See the image - normal on top, irregular on the bottom.

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  • No and Yes. It is no substitute for a proper "12 Lead" ECG/EKG These give detailed information about the electrical signals circulating around the heart and are an excellent diagnostic tool for many heart-related issues..This project does monitor one electrical region of the heart, it has an accurate time-base, so enables accurate timings to be determined. For me, its main benefit is that it enabled me to get a trace of a very intermittent problem which 'proper' medical monitoring had failed to pick up.

    Many thanks for your comment - the project was great fun and useful!

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  • I have no clue whether you are getting these replies, but I'm trying to help! Instructables comments system seems to be broken.Myford are still actively advertising the part you need (expensive).https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/offer-listing/B00SYI2P...

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  • I have written a long and detailed reply to this post, including photos and links, but I cannot now see it. I hope the new system has not lost it. I really dislike the recent 'improvements' to this site - I may well switch to YouTube when I want to help others in future.

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  • Stripping a Myford ML10 Lathe (Speed 10) Headstock - Taper Roller Bearings

    Sorry, I thought you meant the 'backgear cluster', my mistake. You are after the "65T Backgear" (I think the gear on its own had Myford part number 73/1209, and the whole assembly with the gear and the little tooth+screw is Myford part number 70/1226). Unfortunately, Myford don't seem to have that gear available, although you might email them to check (they have the version for the Super 7, etc) orders@myford.co.uk Phone 01422 885766 (UK is +44 from abroad).If you want to do threads, you really do need the 65T backgear to be working. It should align with the backgear cluster (the two gear pair which are on the separate axle). It looks like your headstock has been assembled incorrectly, the 65T backgear and the backgear cluster should align perfectly, before the 65T backgear alle…

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    Sorry, I thought you meant the 'backgear cluster', my mistake. You are after the "65T Backgear" (I think the gear on its own had Myford part number 73/1209, and the whole assembly with the gear and the little tooth+screw is Myford part number 70/1226). Unfortunately, Myford don't seem to have that gear available, although you might email them to check (they have the version for the Super 7, etc) orders@myford.co.uk Phone 01422 885766 (UK is +44 from abroad).If you want to do threads, you really do need the 65T backgear to be working. It should align with the backgear cluster (the two gear pair which are on the separate axle). It looks like your headstock has been assembled incorrectly, the 65T backgear and the backgear cluster should align perfectly, before the 65T backgear allen screw is tightened to fix the 65T backgear onto the spindle.I think your other problem will go away once you have the headstock properly assembled. I have attached a few photos which might help you see what it should look like.In your situation, I would disassemble the spindle, check to see if Myford have a 65T Backgear, then (if not) take the 65T backgear to a local engineering company, to see if they can help by welding, brazing, etc.Best of luck

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  • I'm afraid that the only one I can see at the moment is a full-priced one from Myford (£52.80)https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/MYFORD-21-56T-BACKGEAR-CLUSTER-for-ML7-ML10-Direct-From-Myford/111169659910?You can see the same one herehttps://www.myford.co.uk/acatalog/B50.-21-56T-BACKGEAR-CLUSTER--70-1218-40.htmlThey do come up for sale from time-to-time as people break their old ones. The ML7 backgear is the same, so search for both.If you search for backgear broken tooth repair, you will see that people do repair these gears. I don't think it is simple, but people build them up with weld, or braze some steel on in the broken area. If you have an obliging engineering firm near you, you might take it in and see what they offer. Once you have some material in the gap, you can do a half-decent…

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    I'm afraid that the only one I can see at the moment is a full-priced one from Myford (£52.80)https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/MYFORD-21-56T-BACKGEAR-CLUSTER-for-ML7-ML10-Direct-From-Myford/111169659910?You can see the same one herehttps://www.myford.co.uk/acatalog/B50.-21-56T-BACKGEAR-CLUSTER--70-1218-40.htmlThey do come up for sale from time-to-time as people break their old ones. The ML7 backgear is the same, so search for both.If you search for backgear broken tooth repair, you will see that people do repair these gears. I don't think it is simple, but people build them up with weld, or braze some steel on in the broken area. If you have an obliging engineering firm near you, you might take it in and see what they offer. Once you have some material in the gap, you can do a half-decent tooth profile with a file, etc - takes time, but can be done.This website gives two methods, the first would be beyond me, but the second looks possible!http://home.iprimus.com.au/stevor/gearrepairs.htm

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    • Myford ML10 Lathe Oil Nipple Socket for Cone Pulley Lubrication
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  • I'm sorry I can't remember the details :-(Would this (Aqualisa Replacement Cartridge) manual help you?http://www.free-instruction-manuals.com/pdf/pa_104...I believe that a new cartridge solves all (??) the dripping problems, so you might have to be prepared to go down that route at a bigger cost. However, if the O-ring set is still available at modest cost, that surely has to be worth a punt? I remember being very annoyed at my error (see step 3) - I glued the nut back together and reassembled the controller - it was easy to reassemble (having learned about not tightening it too much), but gluing nylon/plastic never works!!!! so I had to get the whole replacement cartridge.Given that warning, the servicing is pretty straightforward - its one of those things that a DIYer suffers - a profes…

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    I'm sorry I can't remember the details :-(Would this (Aqualisa Replacement Cartridge) manual help you?http://www.free-instruction-manuals.com/pdf/pa_104...I believe that a new cartridge solves all (??) the dripping problems, so you might have to be prepared to go down that route at a bigger cost. However, if the O-ring set is still available at modest cost, that surely has to be worth a punt? I remember being very annoyed at my error (see step 3) - I glued the nut back together and reassembled the controller - it was easy to reassemble (having learned about not tightening it too much), but gluing nylon/plastic never works!!!! so I had to get the whole replacement cartridge.Given that warning, the servicing is pretty straightforward - its one of those things that a DIYer suffers - a professional learns from each experience, but DIYers normally do these sort of things once only (so don't really learn from their experience). Give it a go!Best of luck

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    • Google Home & Alexa Mains Switch
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    • Myford ML10 Lathe Chuck Soft Jaws
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      3 comments
  • Many thanks - yep nothing innovative here - except the dimensions for the ML10 perhaps! Best wishes.

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  • qthurtle completed the lesson Mitres in the class Table Saw Class
  • I'm very sorry, but I have no experience of any other motor, so I can't help. Mine had four internal terminals not three, so I'm afraid I'm not going to be of any use to you!Best wishes - I hope you sort it out.

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  • You might be right, but lots of 3D printed projects have to be made to quite tight tolerances. For example, separate parts need to fit together, and components have to mesh together, etc. The models created by 123D are very precise - dimensions are entered to three decimal places - that's to one thousandth of a mm! (I was surprised to learn that Sketchup has an absolute limit on its resolution to 1/64th inch - about 0.4mm - which is interesting for 3D printing).The attached photos show a shower door runner designed in 123D. The hole is a sliding fit on a 5mm rod - it is drawn at 5.1mm diameter. In measuring the one I had to copy, I used a digital caliper and measured to 0.05mm (which is easily achieved), so some precision is needed, even for every-day objects.Many thanks for your interest…

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    You might be right, but lots of 3D printed projects have to be made to quite tight tolerances. For example, separate parts need to fit together, and components have to mesh together, etc. The models created by 123D are very precise - dimensions are entered to three decimal places - that's to one thousandth of a mm! (I was surprised to learn that Sketchup has an absolute limit on its resolution to 1/64th inch - about 0.4mm - which is interesting for 3D printing).The attached photos show a shower door runner designed in 123D. The hole is a sliding fit on a 5mm rod - it is drawn at 5.1mm diameter. In measuring the one I had to copy, I used a digital caliper and measured to 0.05mm (which is easily achieved), so some precision is needed, even for every-day objects.Many thanks for your interest. Best wishes.

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  • Googling for answers to the same question, I keep coming to this Instructable!It prompted me to sort out a technique which can be used. AutoDesk 123D may have evolved since the question was posed; but here is a link to a video which shows my attempt. It could be done in well under the 10 minutes of the video!I bet there are better ways to do it! Hope this helps somebody.

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