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srhnz

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  • srhnz commented on srhnz's instructable Computer Desk - 1 Board
    Computer Desk - 1 Board

    I didn't take it as being sarcastic, and was thanking you for taking the time to make a comment. Many pass through and don't say a thing, which is also OK. I just really appreciated your feedback.Murphy Law says anything I make was done months before a relevant contest comes up, like my home grown CNC (18 months ago), laser cutter (2 months ago), and the 2 new wheeled cabinets for both which I built just this weekend. It's like the team here know what I'm building then weeks down the track have a comp for it! :D Cheers.

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  • srhnz's instructable Computer Desk - 1 Board's weekly stats:
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  • srhnz commented on srhnz's instructable Computer Desk - 1 Board
    Computer Desk - 1 Board

    Thanks for your kind comments :-)

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  • srhnz commented on srhnz's instructable Computer Desk - 1 Board
    Computer Desk - 1 Board

    Thanks for the feedback.I did consider that option using the large triangular leftovers from the legs+back panel cut, split in half (4 x triangle pieces) and attached to the inside corners as you have suggested. I found it was a pretty sturdy table..enough to haul my carcass up onto it, do a little dance, make a little noise, get down tonight (flashback for anyone old enough).I used 3 x bolt/threaded rod per leg to attach the lid, and having the pressure pulling down on a 56mm wide leg section each side added a lot of rigidity made it really stable even without the backing.Drilling the inserts wasn't a problem with the battery drill. It's a 9.5mm hole that only needs to go the depth of the insert which is ~12mm. This is followed through with a 7mm bit to provide space for the excess bo…

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    Thanks for the feedback.I did consider that option using the large triangular leftovers from the legs+back panel cut, split in half (4 x triangle pieces) and attached to the inside corners as you have suggested. I found it was a pretty sturdy table..enough to haul my carcass up onto it, do a little dance, make a little noise, get down tonight (flashback for anyone old enough).I used 3 x bolt/threaded rod per leg to attach the lid, and having the pressure pulling down on a 56mm wide leg section each side added a lot of rigidity made it really stable even without the backing.Drilling the inserts wasn't a problem with the battery drill. It's a 9.5mm hole that only needs to go the depth of the insert which is ~12mm. This is followed through with a 7mm bit to provide space for the excess bolt length. The key is getting the pilot hole right, and only deep enough into the back panel edge to mark where the holes are through the sides. I think I was also helped by the quality of ply I had. I notice non-construction grade ply has quite low quality inner layers and they definitely explode if edge drilling and sending in large screws.Thanks again and have a great day :)

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  • srhnz commented on srhnz's instructable CNC Pendant
    CNC Pendant

    Hey Richard,By all means it can be made without the screen, I just use it to tell me the current state (ie, what jog step size I set for the axis, verify the zeroing function had run, etc). In hindsight I would have given a bit more space between the buttons for labels, or add a cheat-sheet panel so I can remember some of my button setups.If you wanted to remove the LCD screen from the sketch, just remove/comment anything that references the LCD_I2C or line starting with "lcd." ("lcd.begin();" for example. There's also calls to a couple of lcd functions 'lcdUpdate' and 'lcdHome' which you will also want to comment out or remove. The functions can stay (if you want) since there's going to be nothing calling them and it won't cause a sketch error.Any more questions or…

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    Hey Richard,By all means it can be made without the screen, I just use it to tell me the current state (ie, what jog step size I set for the axis, verify the zeroing function had run, etc). In hindsight I would have given a bit more space between the buttons for labels, or add a cheat-sheet panel so I can remember some of my button setups.If you wanted to remove the LCD screen from the sketch, just remove/comment anything that references the LCD_I2C or line starting with "lcd." ("lcd.begin();" for example. There's also calls to a couple of lcd functions 'lcdUpdate' and 'lcdHome' which you will also want to comment out or remove. The functions can stay (if you want) since there's going to be nothing calling them and it won't cause a sketch error.Any more questions or advice, please don't hesitate to ask.Cheers.

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  • srhnz commented on mcmaven's instructable Furious Tourbillon
    Furious Tourbillon

    Someone going to have to come up with something pretty spectacular to beat this entry! Nice work and well done for even attempting something this complex.Ref the acrylic cement: I use Weldon #4 for acrylic and PLA. You can run into the same "where did all my solvent go?" issue, but it's a lot friendlier to use. My method is a bit of metal rod like bronze welding rod. Dip and apply..much easier to control. For larger tasks, a good quality artist paintrush is ideal. The Weldon doesn't glue the bristles together so cleanup is simply let it evaporate.

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  • Jumbo CNC Laser Etcher Designed With Autodesk Fusion 360

    Just curious about the choice of driver/stepper combo. You’ve got Nema17 1.5A steppers but pushing them along with TB6600 drivers capable of driving 4A steppers. The protoneer CNC shield can take step sticks from the old A4988 @2A, DRV8825 @2.5A and the newer TMC2208/2209 @2.8A. A4988s go for less than $1 each depending on where you shop. Obviously theses are a cheaper option for only slightly less current capacity, but you’re not exactly pushing a high load around so would be good to understand your rationale.As soon as my laser module arrives, I can tick “I built this”..good instructable :-)

    I know exactly what you mean, with a few projects being delayed because of under-guesstimating :DI would def go for the NEMA 23 @2.8A when you do the cutter project. Same TB6600 drivers and you’ll have a good combo.

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  • Jumbo CNC Laser Etcher Designed With Autodesk Fusion 360

    por favor disculpe mi traductor de Google :)El pin 11 es la señal para el controlador láser, no la fuente de alimentación principal. Utiliza PWM para cambiar la fuerza del láser (no en general, pero el uso de ráfagas cortas de encendido / apagado cambia efectivamente la profundidad a la que se quemará)

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  • srhnz's instructable CNC Pendant's weekly stats:
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  • Floating World Backlit Moss Map With Arduino Fiber Optic LED Cities

    Will let you know when New Zealand gets electricity.. Should arrive just after we get water in taps and double lanes for the horse and carts 😜

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  • If you can, use ZIF sockets (search "universal ZIF socket"). I use them on a home baked board that stacks onto a UNO, and also have one plugged into my breadboard. Saves the pins on the chips from too much stress through pushing/pulling them out of the DIP socket. Lost a couple of chips through having the legs finally give up after several visits back and forth to the programmer. They come in various sizes, so can easily make a board that will take a range of chip sizes.On the breadboard they are great for any DIP/DIPP/DIL chip. Used them with OpAmps, shift registers, motor drivers..the works.

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  • "Don't use acrylic"(??)...I built a Mendel 90 (self sourced parts..not a kit), used 10mm acrylic for the base, 6mm everywhere else, including the gantry. Was rigid enough to stand on (when I was a tubby 95kg) and no deformation. I also flame polished the edges after cutting and it comes out looking quite tidy.Clone 1.75mm j-heads.. The only time I had issues with them was due to variations in the PLA I was putting through it. Black gave me the worst problems since most cheap black PLA is a mashup of leftover other colours with a lot of black colouring, and ended up with endless clogging.I have never used tape or any other coating on the glass. Scrape with a blade, wipe with isopropyl, print. The only thing I do is leave the heatbed on for the duration of the print..because…

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    "Don't use acrylic"(??)...I built a Mendel 90 (self sourced parts..not a kit), used 10mm acrylic for the base, 6mm everywhere else, including the gantry. Was rigid enough to stand on (when I was a tubby 95kg) and no deformation. I also flame polished the edges after cutting and it comes out looking quite tidy.Clone 1.75mm j-heads.. The only time I had issues with them was due to variations in the PLA I was putting through it. Black gave me the worst problems since most cheap black PLA is a mashup of leftover other colours with a lot of black colouring, and ended up with endless clogging.I have never used tape or any other coating on the glass. Scrape with a blade, wipe with isopropyl, print. The only thing I do is leave the heatbed on for the duration of the print..because as soon as is cools enough, the part just pops off, most times all by itself as the glass contracts. The bonus of this is that I very rarely have to recalibrate or level the bed, and I only have to if I service the hotend. Last print I did was about 6 months after the one before. Loaded the g-code, pressed print..flawless victory!I've seen (or rather, read in the reprap forums) where quite a few fall over where the builder has used a minimum spec'd PSU, then cranked up the stepper pots to try and get the axiis moving properly. 550W are easy enough to get nowadays and will be ample to cover all the fan, heatbed (running upwards of 11A!), hotend and stepper requirements without running the risk of power sags, which will cause the RAMPS board to hit a reset condition.Absolutely agree about changing out the MOSFET for the heatbed. Mine produced a nice puff of smoke the first time..The IRLB8743PBF MOSFET is the one to go for, runs nice and cool, and cheap as chips (pardon the pun)Would highly recommend the fan for the ramps board, mainly for the steppers. Read this great discussion article on the differences in the A4988 and the DRV8825 drivers - http://reprap.org/wiki/A4988_vs_DRV8825_Chinese_St... You could then run the 2.5A Nema 17 steppers...if you wanted to (811 instead of 804 in the part number)Congrats on the build..and subsequent rebuild/upgrade. These exercises in rethinking concepts, identifying and solutioneering small issues can only serve to make the next version the best yet.Cheers

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  • srhnz commented on Vulcaman's instructable Cherry- 60€ 3D-Printer

    I built a Mendel90 printer (self sourced parts, not a kit) and I got 10mm for the main base plate, 6mm for the hotbed plate, gantry and back plates. It is very rigid. It is more expensive than MDF but if you find a sign maker or otherwise business that uses acrylic sheet, they will normally have offcuts that will be big enough for this.

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  • srhnz commented on Vulcaman's instructable Cherry- 60€ 3D-Printer

    Just be wary with MDF as it is sensitive to moisture in the air and tends to shrink or grow depending on humidity levels. Highly recommend that it is painted or sealed on every face to limit the absorption...unless you enjoy re-calibrating after each run. I used acrylic sheet which is rock solid, can be drilled and tapped for screws and not overly sensitive to heat. I only ever have to recalibrate if I have to remove the hotend for maintenance...which is rare.

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  • srhnz commented on Vulcaman's instructable Cherry- 60€ 3D-Printer

    Endstops provide a home point. Without them, the controller doesn't know where 0,0,0 is on any of its axiis,. You can get away with no limiting end stops but the RAMPS software has to be carefully set to use a max distance from the home point as the outer limits.

    check pot settings on the stepper drivers. If set too low, they will not provide enough current to power them. Check out the reprap forums for how-to on setting up the drivers without nuking them...which is easy to do if you are not careful.

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