Using a Rotary Tool to Trim a Dogs Nails

Dogs nails, like ours, need to be clipped or trimmed on a regular basis. Clipping is the most common method but it is often difficult to avoid cutting into the nail vein and it leaves sharp edges on the nail. The dremel tool, when mastered, allows the nail to be trimmed until the vein is just visible and the edges of the nail can be rounded.

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Step 1: Condition the Dog to Be Comfortable With the Sound of the Tool. Treats Help With This Step.

The best way to do this is to turn the tool on in the dogs presence and feed a treat. This step will need to be done on a regular basis to allow the dog to get comfortable.

Step 2: Trim the Fur of the Paws Before Doing the Nails to Prevent Accidents.

This step is necessary for long haired dogs to prevent the fur from catching in the tool. It is also possible to hold the paws in such a way as to keep the fur away from the tool but that can be awkward.

Step 3: Holding the Dog,

All dogs have their quirks. This dog is comfortable on her back with the forearm holding her in position for the front paws but must be standing and under the arm for the rear paws and some dogs are most comfortable on their sides while others need to be standing while you hold their paws to the rear. A little experimenting will let you find what work best.

Hold the paw in one hand, using the thumb to spread the nails.

Step 4: Make Short Passes Over the Nail to Avoid Over Heating.

With the tool turned to full speed, gently touch each nail and grind it down. Short passes are needed to prevent the nail from overheating. Stop when the quick becomes visible. Smooth the edges of the nail to avoid having it snag on clothing.

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    3 Discussions

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    BeachsideHank

    3 years ago

    This is the method professionals use, it's safer, less traumatic, and much more aseptic than metal snips. My Dachshund responds well to this routine, but has to be handled upright, she detests laying on her side or back. And yes, a treat also helps get her cooperation. ☺

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    Emriick

    3 years ago

    Friction generates heat rapidly edpecially when those drums are dull

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    Emriick

    3 years ago

    Thats going to smell horrible and likely burn your dogs toe