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< Electrical Engineer | Runner | Outdoor Explorer > By day I get to design rockets, and in the evenings I’m a national level runner. Even with all that some of the greatest joys are in the things I get to create with imagination and ingenuity. Whatever you love to do go out there and chase it down!

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  • Restoring a Wood & Canvas Canoe

    Thanks, totally overlooked putting a link to their website. Very helpful people over there, they can help answer any build questions and find out very detailed info about your boats production history!

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  • Restoring a Wood & Canvas Canoe

    Were you quoted for installing the skin or just the cost of the fabric? I purchased my fabric in the untreated state, which usually cost ~6 dollars/yd. You can buy fabric from a canoe supplier that has been treated with a mildew resisting agent and has been preshrunk for ~18 dollars/yd. If you went with an untreated fabric I would estimate about $275 including paint supplies, sand paper, etc. I broke out the major items needed to complete a re-skinning:Canoe Tacks: $20Canvas Fabric: 7yds, $48Canoe filler: 1gal, $72Epifanes Paint: 2x750ml, $96Paint Rollers, brushes $20Major Item Total: $256This leaves a little room leftover for various 2x4s used to pull the canvas taught and a set of stands. It’s definitely a project anyone can do and will certainly save s lot of money compared to gettin...

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    Were you quoted for installing the skin or just the cost of the fabric? I purchased my fabric in the untreated state, which usually cost ~6 dollars/yd. You can buy fabric from a canoe supplier that has been treated with a mildew resisting agent and has been preshrunk for ~18 dollars/yd. If you went with an untreated fabric I would estimate about $275 including paint supplies, sand paper, etc. I broke out the major items needed to complete a re-skinning:Canoe Tacks: $20Canvas Fabric: 7yds, $48Canoe filler: 1gal, $72Epifanes Paint: 2x750ml, $96Paint Rollers, brushes $20Major Item Total: $256This leaves a little room leftover for various 2x4s used to pull the canvas taught and a set of stands. It’s definitely a project anyone can do and will certainly save s lot of money compared to getting it restored professionally!

    Wow how cool to have a boat over a century old!! Good luck on the restoration it’s wonderful to see people paddling classics!

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  • Electrically_Inclined's entry Restoring a Wood & Canvas Canoe is a winner in the Fix It! Contest contest 4 months ago
  • Electrically_Inclined's instructable Restoring a Wood & Canvas Canoe's weekly stats: 4 months ago
    • Restoring a Wood & Canvas Canoe
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      9 comments
  • Electrically_Inclined's entry Restoring a Wood & Canvas Canoe is a finalist in the Fix It! Contest contest 4 months ago
  • Restoring a Wood & Canvas Canoe

    Thanks so much! I did a weight test today and the boat came in at 66.3lbs and is 16ft long. Mine is for sure heavy, The decks, seats, and rails are hardwood and could probably be switched for a lighter material (Though I did specifically go for a lower density mahogany on the rails).I think this is actually similar to your average fiberglass boat but far heavier than the amazing composite canoes being built today which I believe are in the low 30lbs. With that in mind though, I have heard of quite a few wood canoe owners doing hundreds of miles and portages in the Boundary Waters and other places.

    Thanks KJ!

    Thanks...Chestnuts are beautiful boats, hope its going well! For fairing I would definitely recommend trying to get a smooth hull before skinning. On older boats like mine, the wood can cup slightly across the width of the board and you can't sand that away beforehand without cutting to deeply into the planks. If you can get it smooth before than you can do a quick sanding once your filler is dry and apply a build primer. This will cover any pinholes and get a great surface for paint without cutting away the filler which is the main protection of the hull.I usually mix my own Low Density filler. I take some regular Bondo that you find at the store, add fiberglass resin(not epoxy). This will thin the mixture and make it spreadable over large areas. In large areas you will sand it almost ...

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    Thanks...Chestnuts are beautiful boats, hope its going well! For fairing I would definitely recommend trying to get a smooth hull before skinning. On older boats like mine, the wood can cup slightly across the width of the board and you can't sand that away beforehand without cutting to deeply into the planks. If you can get it smooth before than you can do a quick sanding once your filler is dry and apply a build primer. This will cover any pinholes and get a great surface for paint without cutting away the filler which is the main protection of the hull.I usually mix my own Low Density filler. I take some regular Bondo that you find at the store, add fiberglass resin(not epoxy). This will thin the mixture and make it spreadable over large areas. In large areas you will sand it almost all back so weight isn't too much of an issue. For larger patches I add more additional resin to the mixture and glass microballons to keep it light. I think there are some more spreadable fillers on the market that are for that purpose but I had supplies available in the shop!

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