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Killawhat

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Ex electronics tech, now sales rep living in the snowy region. Always tinkering fixing or building something in the workshop. I play guitar, I fix guitars, I build guitars. Any project that has wood, electronics or music - that's what I'm into.

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  • Ultimate Dad Cave, Garden Office and Workshop

    Looks like it came up good! Went a bit berserk with the insulation, but with -30 I can see why. And with all the insulation it should be easy to keep warm. My trouble would be the getting to and from the house to get to the shed LOL. I just don't want to leave the house when it's cold.If/when you decide to build again, a quick tip when you're making your frames - Once you've built your floor platform, build the framed walls on that laying down. You can insulate, vapour barrier and clad it all while flat. Then just stand them up and nail in place. Saves a heap of time and effort climbing ladders to flame. And you've got the boys there to help lift. But even if you don't, you can make some leaning braces out of 2x4s to hold it up temporarily. Even when I'm just framing stuff, it's still eas…

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    Looks like it came up good! Went a bit berserk with the insulation, but with -30 I can see why. And with all the insulation it should be easy to keep warm. My trouble would be the getting to and from the house to get to the shed LOL. I just don't want to leave the house when it's cold.If/when you decide to build again, a quick tip when you're making your frames - Once you've built your floor platform, build the framed walls on that laying down. You can insulate, vapour barrier and clad it all while flat. Then just stand them up and nail in place. Saves a heap of time and effort climbing ladders to flame. And you've got the boys there to help lift. But even if you don't, you can make some leaning braces out of 2x4s to hold it up temporarily. Even when I'm just framing stuff, it's still easier to make them while lying flat. That way you can square it up easily, know it's flat and put the blacing in. Oh and BTW, speed bracing's your friend when framing ;)

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  • Workshop Cabinet With Reused Materials

    I like the idea of icecream sticks for labels!

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  • Cheap and Easy Organizing Hacks for Small Components

    Some good ideas. The small organisers are a great idea for SMD components, transistors and small caps. Not so much for regular sized resistors and ICs. Its a shame nobody really makes 30mm squared organiser bins at a reasonable price - would be perfect for most electronics components.

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  • Organizing Your Woodshop

    So by the looks of the results (whats left) a lot of the clutter went in the bin?

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  • Killawhat commented on rbyrer's instructable Electronics Parts Storage
    Electronics Parts Storage

    Nice project - definitely thinking outside the box (or drawer LOL). I've been looking for an easy solution to parts storage (mainly for resistors, caps etc) that can hold a lot of parts but thin drawers to replace my older cabinet I made. Parts drawers are just astonomical and take up too much space. I think this would be a cheap and easy solution. Maybe need the slots a little deeper, but great solution.

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  • How Much Do You Pay for Your Cache ?

    Well, you wrote your instructable - thats enough I reckon!

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  • How Much Do You Pay for Your Cache ?

    I wasn't aware you could get multi-coin mechanisms! I've only ever seen the single coin mech's where you load a comparison coin. Thanks for the heads up.

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  • Busy Button Box - Montessori-style Electronic Board Toy for Toddlers

    I've got a Grandson that's got ADHD and I'm sure something like this would be right up his alley. He loves playing with locks and lights.Other than the hard to read schematic, it's an awesome little project. From an electronics point of view, you're better off starting with the power supply on the left, have your positive rails at the top, negative at the bottom and fill the components in between (something like what I've attached).Thanks for the inspiration!

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  • Make Professional Looking Front Panels for Your Next DIY Project

    Thanks for the suggestion - sounds like a great idea. I'll have a look next time I'm in an arts store. Although, I do have a lamina-tor so might give that a go as well next time. If it works well, I might update this instructable.

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  • Build a Dual 15V Power Supply Using Off the Shelf Modules for Under $50

    Glad you managed to adapt it for your purpose. You might want to also put a couple of large diodes reversed across the -/0V and 0V/+ terminals (so anode -ve to cathode 0V, anode 0V to cathode +ve) just in case one of the power supplied drifts off a bit and runs away! The diodes should generally be rated 2x the max current each supply will draw. Just to be safe. But yes, you can pick up old laptop supplies pretty cheap even if you have to buy two. The generally come in way under buying a ferrite transformer these days. Last time I priced a torroid transformer they were up over $50.

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  •  DIY Lab Bench Power Supply [Build + Tests]

    Yep, those 36V/5A switchmode power transformers are cheap and great for these types of projects. Just add any type of regulator to the 36V output and you're pretty much good to go. The jiffy boxes are easy to find and use, although I tend to search for the plastic lab project boxes with a moveable handle on the front. Nice project.

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  • Folding Extension Cord Organizer!

    I built something like this myself a few years back. Again, with a bit of inspiration from Pinterest! I ended up just using 12mm ply scraps. The main thing with these is that wall mounting bracket - it has to be strong, very strong to hold the weight when upright and loading the extension leads. I like the inclusion of the swivel hooks which was something I never thought of. I ended up hard mounting mine in reverse and they stay put no worries.

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  • Homemade Bandsaw by DIY Enthusiast

    I seen your comment and realised you may have misinterpreted my comment and I might have come off sounding like an arsehole, which wasn't my intention. The comment of cutting into beer drinking time was more of a joking comment. Time is precious and I try and use it wisely vs cost. I suppose the older you get the more you seem to value your time and what you put it towards.

    You can see a bit of my workshop here when I was building this https://www.instructables.com/DIY-Shop-Built-Flip-...Most of the larger cuts had to be done outside before I built this.

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  • Homemade Bandsaw by DIY Enthusiast

    I like to build tools as well. While I can applaud the build, I don't know if personally I'd go to that much trouble for a small bandsaw when you can pick up a new one that size for about $150. That time would cut into drinking time. You should have made a bigger one - Those buggers go for thousands! But a great build non the less, well done. I'll have to check out some of your other builds.

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  • Make Professional Looking Front Panels for Your Next DIY Project

    Great to hear. Yeah I think if you use a smooth premium paper to print on, it comes out better than using standard paper - which seems to be a little bumpy when you put sticky film over the top.

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  • Killawhat followed Tools, Life Hacks, Woodworking, Pallets and 20 others channel
  • Shop Organization Tips and Practices

    I've thought of doing something like this on a smaller scale for things I use all the time. The only thing that puts me off is the dust collected on the tools. Generally I've got a few different types of tools and they get placed in different area's whether it be toolboxes, drawers or racking. Car tools in one shed along with mowers, chainsaws, fuels, fencing gear etc, wood working tools in another shed with a quick access tool box for anything I need mobile (a few handtools, measuring devices, small box screws & nails, ratchet drivers & drills), then all the electronics stuff inside. There's also a toolbox for guitar setup tools and parts. Some of the tools are double ups and over lap, but it's worth it for the convenience instead of going out into one shed to get something for a…

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    I've thought of doing something like this on a smaller scale for things I use all the time. The only thing that puts me off is the dust collected on the tools. Generally I've got a few different types of tools and they get placed in different area's whether it be toolboxes, drawers or racking. Car tools in one shed along with mowers, chainsaws, fuels, fencing gear etc, wood working tools in another shed with a quick access tool box for anything I need mobile (a few handtools, measuring devices, small box screws & nails, ratchet drivers & drills), then all the electronics stuff inside. There's also a toolbox for guitar setup tools and parts. Some of the tools are double ups and over lap, but it's worth it for the convenience instead of going out into one shed to get something for another.But I like the idea of mobile storage. If you have a drill press, put all your drill and driver bits there, router table - put all your router bits there. Makes sense if you have the room.

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  • Build a Dual 15V Power Supply Using Off the Shelf Modules for Under $50

    I couldn't find any spec's from the module sellers. However if you look up the datasheet for the regulators (LM317 or LM337) at max, the typical load regulation is 0.5% of output voltage with a 10uF output cap. Obviously, the higher the output voltage the more noise is introduced. But regulators are are generally pretty quiet.

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  • DIY Shop Built Flip Down Panel Saw for Under $50 in an Afternoon

    No worries, it's pretty easy to make. Basically just a rack and a slide for the saw which is probably the most time consuming

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  • DIY Shop Built Flip Down Panel Saw for Under $50 in an Afternoon

    2.54mm=1 inch, 300mm=1 foot. But the measurements I used aren't important. You can make it any size you like. It's the concept of what was done.A rebate I think the US guys call a rabit or lap joint. Have a look at the pictures.

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  • Make Professional Looking Front Panels for Your Next DIY Project

    I haven't tried it with lacquer's but previous experience says it may make the letters run because of the solvents - That's mainly why I suggested clear film as a protector. Plus it's easy to remove if you change your mind down the track. But try it and see how you go. There is a function in the software to reverse the image. I would suggest if you are going to iron on the image that you print on the used portion of a labels sheet (smooth side), the toner will come off easier when you heat it. My experience when doing circuit boards this way is not all the toner transfers and can leave the image sketchy and jagged. Plus, not everyone has a laser printer, but it's a good suggestion. Using electro chemical etching is way beyond what I'd intended this instructable to be. I think if you were …

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    I haven't tried it with lacquer's but previous experience says it may make the letters run because of the solvents - That's mainly why I suggested clear film as a protector. Plus it's easy to remove if you change your mind down the track. But try it and see how you go. There is a function in the software to reverse the image. I would suggest if you are going to iron on the image that you print on the used portion of a labels sheet (smooth side), the toner will come off easier when you heat it. My experience when doing circuit boards this way is not all the toner transfers and can leave the image sketchy and jagged. Plus, not everyone has a laser printer, but it's a good suggestion. Using electro chemical etching is way beyond what I'd intended this instructable to be. I think if you were going to go through that effort, you might as well contact the makers of the software and have the panel professionally made by them. Even though the software's free and is great as a DIY tool, that's what the software was designed for after all.

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  • Make Professional Looking Front Panels for Your Next DIY Project

    Thanks, hope you get some use out of it.I'm actually thinking of doing a little update to this as I find better ways of utilising FPD

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    • Cheap Dual 30V/2A Project Power Supply
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  • Very Cheap $30 Miter Saw Stand

    Pretty good idea. For those that don't have a welder, you can get plastic joiners and build a similar frame (they have T's, joiners and corners), it just clips together. And just use countersunk screws to attach the drawer rails. Definitely not as sturdy as welding, but good if you don't own a welder. Maybe a set of wheels on the bottom? It would make it a lot easier to move around the shop. Cheers for sharing.

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  • Cheap Tool Box Organization

    I've been looking for a way to organize metal sliding drawers and nothing really hits the spot. Store bought stuff while it might be easy, costs a tonne and generally doesn't fit the draws so you're left with unused space. Using a piece of MDF and dowels is so cheap and easy and very customizable. In the smaller drawers I'd probably use 3mm (to cut down on in height) but there's some great ideas here. Thanks for sharing!

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    • Build This 5Hz to 400KHz LED Sweep Signal Generator From Kits
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  • Build This 5Hz to 400KHz LED Sweep Signal Generator From Kits

    Thanks for the suggestion audreyobscura. Never even occurred to me to enter it into that particular category! Cheers

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    • Make Professional Looking Front Panels for Your Next DIY Project
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  • Make Professional Looking Front Panels for Your Next DIY Project

    Thanks Mate. Try it with the gloss paper. I think you'll have even better results.

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  • Build a Dual 15V Power Supply Using Off the Shelf Modules for Under $50

    I had a bit of a look and there's some V/A meters with a current sensing ring. I think that's the easiest for this sort of application (where you have split rails). I don't think there's an easy way around it other than sensing rings.As for the input voltages before a regulator, they only need to be to 1.5V above the output in most cases. The rest just turns to heat (which is what you get when you go from 19V to a 5V output) ;)But thanks for the heads up on the meters problem. I'll put out a MK2 at some stage!

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  • Build a Dual 15V Power Supply Using Off the Shelf Modules for Under $50

    The whole point of using the SMPS from old laptops was to keep the cost down (and to sort of use off "the shelf" parts and modules - so you didn't have to stuff around too much). A 12-0-12V @2A transformer over here runs you about $30 and not much cheaper (with shipping) off ebay. The SMPS were only about $6-7ea at the time, so two came in at half the price of an AC trannie. But the original schematic for the regular board (which is what I posted) suggests using an AC trannie. And yes, in the project I ripped out the rectification off the regulator board and jumped them over (as in the photos). The output caps should provide a small load anyway to stop oscillations. The LM317/337 are pretty good from that standpoint. And yes, you're right - The SMPS do have some higher frequency…

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    The whole point of using the SMPS from old laptops was to keep the cost down (and to sort of use off "the shelf" parts and modules - so you didn't have to stuff around too much). A 12-0-12V @2A transformer over here runs you about $30 and not much cheaper (with shipping) off ebay. The SMPS were only about $6-7ea at the time, so two came in at half the price of an AC trannie. But the original schematic for the regular board (which is what I posted) suggests using an AC trannie. And yes, in the project I ripped out the rectification off the regulator board and jumped them over (as in the photos). The output caps should provide a small load anyway to stop oscillations. The LM317/337 are pretty good from that standpoint. And yes, you're right - The SMPS do have some higher frequency noise, but that's cleaned up pretty well with the linear LM317's (infact a lot of the regular modules clean up noise pretty well if you have a slightly noisy input PS).As for your schematic - it will work and infact this is exactly what I do when I've made other dual supplies with positive only regulator boards. However, I'm not too sure whether you could easily modify the current board to do this (without cutting tracks and making a mess of it).When I get time, I might have another look at the project and see if I can't make it a bit more reliable with the ammeters. I didn't really need current sensing (as it was suppose to be a standalone PS for testing preamps with split supplies). But there wasn't much price difference between just a volt meter and a volt/amp combo at the time. The output switch is in the wrong position too and should be between the volt meter and output (which it isn't and I noted it at the end of the project).

    Yeah that would probably work if you were using two separate regulators (and not the dual PS in this project).I think you're right though. I just had a bit of look at mine, and low and behold mine's doing something similar (if you put a dual load between +/0V/- only one of the ammeters will work at a time. Looking back at the schematic I can see why (it's where the ammeters placed on the 0V). The problem is you can't have the pos ammeter on the positive line or it senses both the pos & neg current (which is what I had problems with when I first constructed it).I'm not too sure whether you could use diodes - I don't think so. Unless you treat the pos and neg sides as two separate PS and put a diode off the pos return to 0V and a separate terminal straight off the 0V for the negative si…

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    Yeah that would probably work if you were using two separate regulators (and not the dual PS in this project).I think you're right though. I just had a bit of look at mine, and low and behold mine's doing something similar (if you put a dual load between +/0V/- only one of the ammeters will work at a time. Looking back at the schematic I can see why (it's where the ammeters placed on the 0V). The problem is you can't have the pos ammeter on the positive line or it senses both the pos & neg current (which is what I had problems with when I first constructed it).I'm not too sure whether you could use diodes - I don't think so. Unless you treat the pos and neg sides as two separate PS and put a diode off the pos return to 0V and a separate terminal straight off the 0V for the negative side.The only way I can see it may work, is to put the ammeters before the actual regulators (and you'll sense some of the quiescent current also).I suppose the simplest solution is not to use ammeters!Thanks for the fault detection.

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  • Build a Dual 15V Power Supply Using Off the Shelf Modules for Under $50

    I thought you said you were running the power for the meters off separate power supplies anyway? That was one of the issues I had in that each meters negative's are connected together and you can't separate them (the negative current sense and negative meter power). That's why the power for each meter needs to be a separate power source so they don't interfere with each other. It's not an issue if you only have one PS, but an issue when you put two together and make a +/- dual supply. It might be possible to do it with diodes, but the small 240AC to 12VDC modules are only about $1.50ea so we're not breaking the bank for two of them.

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  • Build a Dual 15V Power Supply Using Off the Shelf Modules for Under $50

    I'd be betting you've connected the meters up wrong. Have a look at the wiring diagram in section again. Notice where the volts/amps meters are connected on the 0V line. I'm sure I had the same issue when I first connected the meters up (although it's been a few years since I built this). Draw out your wiring and think of it as two separate power supplies when connecting the meters (i.e +15V/0V, 0V/-15V). So the volt meters go in parallel, and the ammeters in series (+ to -, even on the negative side of the PS). Also, forget about the output switch for the moment too until you figure out the meter wires. It's most likely the negative side meter that's the problem. And you used separate PS for each meter (240VAC to 12VDC or similar)?? It won't work if you just use something like a buck mod…

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    I'd be betting you've connected the meters up wrong. Have a look at the wiring diagram in section again. Notice where the volts/amps meters are connected on the 0V line. I'm sure I had the same issue when I first connected the meters up (although it's been a few years since I built this). Draw out your wiring and think of it as two separate power supplies when connecting the meters (i.e +15V/0V, 0V/-15V). So the volt meters go in parallel, and the ammeters in series (+ to -, even on the negative side of the PS). Also, forget about the output switch for the moment too until you figure out the meter wires. It's most likely the negative side meter that's the problem. And you used separate PS for each meter (240VAC to 12VDC or similar)?? It won't work if you just use something like a buck module as they're negatives aren't isolated (which is the whole point of using the AC to DC PS). Let me know how you go.

    I'd be betting you've connected the meters up wrong. Have a look at the wiring diagram in section 3 again. Notice where the volts/amps meters are connected on the 0V line. I'm sure I had the same issue when I first connected the meters up (although it's been a few years since I built this). Draw out your wiring and think of it as two separate power supplies when connecting the meters (i.e +15V/0V, 0V/-15V). So the volt meters go in parallel, and the ammeters in series (+ to -, even on the negative side of the PS). Also, forget about the output switch for the moment too until you figure out the meter wires. It's most likely the negative side meter that's the problem. And you used separate PS for each meter (240VAC to 12VDC or similar)?? It won't work if you just use something like a buck m…

    see more »

    I'd be betting you've connected the meters up wrong. Have a look at the wiring diagram in section 3 again. Notice where the volts/amps meters are connected on the 0V line. I'm sure I had the same issue when I first connected the meters up (although it's been a few years since I built this). Draw out your wiring and think of it as two separate power supplies when connecting the meters (i.e +15V/0V, 0V/-15V). So the volt meters go in parallel, and the ammeters in series (+ to -, even on the negative side of the PS). Also, forget about the output switch for the moment too until you figure out the meter wires. It's most likely the negative side meter that's the problem. And you used separate PS for each meter (240VAC to 12VDC or similar)?? It won't work if you just use something like a buck module as they're negatives aren't isolated (which is the whole point of using the AC to DC PS). Let me know how you go.

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  • Homemade Bullerjan Stove

    Cheer Mate.I suppose you if you were concerned with weight, you can always remove the bricks before you move it? Seems like having a trolley saved you a lot of hassle moving it around. Now I'm wondering whether it would be possible to make it modular by using some threaded rod to keep all the panels together and a seal in-between the panels? Hmmm.

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  • Homemade Bullerjan Stove

    There's an easy way to clean fire place glass easily and you use what it produces! Grab some of the ash from the fire place, a little vinegar and water and rub it on the glass. The soot comes right off!

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  • Killawhat commented on ChristineNZ's instructable SteamPunk Radio
    SteamPunk Radio

    Thanks, that makes sense. I'd planned to do something similar on a guitar if I can get enough depth to it.

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  • Killawhat commented on ChristineNZ's instructable SteamPunk Radio
    SteamPunk Radio

    Great looking project. Must have taken a while to piece together! Do you have a photo of the gate tapes attaching to the pots? You said you used plastic tube, but how did you couple them together?

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  • Etch a Circuit Board With Kitchen Supplies

    I've used transfer paper to make boards myself for years when I need them (although I still use ferric chloride to etch). A couple of things to make the process better: - Before transferring the image onto the board give it a clean with steel wool and an abrasive cleaner (like ajax) to shine it up. Dry it and then use a non stick cleaner (like your acetone, mentholated spirits or grease and wax remover)- Put the iron on the board for a few seconds to preheat it, then lay the transfer on the board with the iron on top to heat the whole thing. The transfer will stick better- Once the board is etched and clean, spray a coat of lacquer over to protect the tracks from corroding (you can generally buy a can of it at the local electronics store) and will last you for years.

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  • DIY Shop Built Flip Down Panel Saw for Under $50 in an Afternoon

    No sorry. I never got around to it. If you have any questions about it I'm happy to answer.

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  • Killawhat commented on steparak's instructable CC/CV Power Supply

    Yeah it all depends on the project. If I'm making something larger, I generally try and include the transformer inside. But a lot of the little projects that require less power (or if I run out of 240V sockets), I generally use wall worts where I can. They're pretty cheap these days too and just makes the build a little quicker and safer.Although I do tend to buy a lot of 240vac/12vdc modules (they're only about $1.50ea). I use them all the time where I need some low 12Vdc power or need to isolate power supplies (like powering meters).

    I'm amazed you fit all that in the tiny box - well done! Laptop supplies are cheap and a great way to power these types of module boards. It might have been better to save a bit of space and just have a DC input from the laptop supply to the box and save wiring up 230V inside. I just got a couple of the LCD buck/boost modules as they were dirt cheap and wanted to see how they'd go (not that I need any more power supplies)!

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  • I liked the Family Guy version - The Six Dollar Man. We have the technology (clunking with used parts), we have the money...but we just don't want to spend it.Nice project BTW

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  • Looks like a pretty easy build. I haven't really got the space at the moment for something like this. Have you got any plans for utilising the space under the benches?

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  • Yeah, initially they generally do still well. But after a few weeks, sometimes they come loose. Not sure why. Sometimes when I'm using them (even on painted surfaces), every 12" or so I'll put a but of electrical tape over it and a staple to hold it in place permanently. Just have to be careful not to press too hard and put the staple through the track.For the power supplies, if you look on ebay for something like "ac dc switch 12v module" you can get a 240V ac to 12v dc board. They're generally only a few bucks each. The only thing is your have to wire them to 240V. 12V laptop power supplies are also pretty cheap as you're probably only looking for something about 1-2 amps. Essentially, the modules are the guts of laptop tranies anyway that they sell off cheap due to crack…

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    Yeah, initially they generally do still well. But after a few weeks, sometimes they come loose. Not sure why. Sometimes when I'm using them (even on painted surfaces), every 12" or so I'll put a but of electrical tape over it and a staple to hold it in place permanently. Just have to be careful not to press too hard and put the staple through the track.For the power supplies, if you look on ebay for something like "ac dc switch 12v module" you can get a 240V ac to 12v dc board. They're generally only a few bucks each. The only thing is your have to wire them to 240V. 12V laptop power supplies are also pretty cheap as you're probably only looking for something about 1-2 amps. Essentially, the modules are the guts of laptop tranies anyway that they sell off cheap due to cracked cases or broken leads, but the guts still work.Yes you can buy one big one, but generally the price goes way up the bigger they get. That's why I find buying a few smaller ones (1-2A) will work out around the same price and you can plug them into a standard socket and move them around as needed. I forgot the amount of times I've reconfigured the workshop and the last time I rewired all the fluoro lights to 240V plugs and wired up the switches with 240V plug sockets strategically placed.Happy hunting.

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  • Great idea. I probably would have given route a coat of clear to help the LED strip stick better. The adhesive they use seems to come unstuck after a while. Personally, I would have routed out the back of the timber an used a cheap laptop power supply or AC/DC switch mode module per light and run an AC lead off it. Then you can plug it in anywhere. I thought the sanded plexi glass was a great cheap idea for frosted covers!

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  • I've got something similar in my shop, except I put a thin back on it to stop stuff falling out behind. I've got them mounted high so I can put my power tool cases above and out of the way.

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  • After 25 odd years of being at it, I don't think anyone will be 100% organized. I think the best anyone can hope for is that everything you have has a spot to call home, try and group like tools together, keep things off the floor and cord out of the way. New things come into the shop at various points whether it be via way of a new tool purchase, new home made jig or tool. Having a somewhat flexible storage system always helps.There's so many different ways to tool and workshop storage, one system doesn't works all the time and multiple systems are generally the key to good storage. Whatever works for you is the right system. Thanks for sharing.

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  • Cool project, I like the spirit of the build but I was cringing at certain parts! The thing is, you can make it a perfectly playable guitar if you changed a couple of things:- You need to have a radius over the whole of the fretboard - 8-12" radius, not just taper it at the sides. Cut your fingerboard slots before you taper and glue it to the neck. Or, just make a cross cut jig if it's already tapered.- And do a bit more shaping of the back of that neck.- Laminating the direction you did and the way the plywood is laminated itself, I think it would stop it twisting but I'm sure there's going to be a significant forward bow once it's strung up. So installing the truss rod is a necessity. There's some easy to install two way truss rods these days (about $10) that you just route a chann…

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    Cool project, I like the spirit of the build but I was cringing at certain parts! The thing is, you can make it a perfectly playable guitar if you changed a couple of things:- You need to have a radius over the whole of the fretboard - 8-12" radius, not just taper it at the sides. Cut your fingerboard slots before you taper and glue it to the neck. Or, just make a cross cut jig if it's already tapered.- And do a bit more shaping of the back of that neck.- Laminating the direction you did and the way the plywood is laminated itself, I think it would stop it twisting but I'm sure there's going to be a significant forward bow once it's strung up. So installing the truss rod is a necessity. There's some easy to install two way truss rods these days (about $10) that you just route a channel and install. If you want to keep it recycled then thread a 1/4 steel rod. But then you'll have to make a jig that curves for your router to do the channel.- The wire looks way too thick for a pickup wind. It works, but generally 42-44 gauge wire is used. I'd also suggest to put something like thin plastic around the screws before winding. Or you could make a bobbin out of laminating a plastic chopping board or similar. At the end, just spray it with some shellac or lacquer instead of the hot glue gun.- Lastly, the intonation is way out on that guitar. I reckon you'd be better attaching some steel tube, notching it for the bridge. Also, angle it back a bit on the bass side which should help with intonationThe pickguard on the table saw was cool looking, but I would have routed the control channels from the top and used the left over vinyl with the label as the pickguard.Keep it up!

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  • Very nice. I've been wanting to build something like this for a while - just a longer version. Last time I took some acrylic up to plastics supplier to have it bent, cost me $20 per bend!

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  • Killawhat commented on thenetdog's instructable Parts Workbench

    Pretty good idea. I don't think it works so well for the way I work as I generally like tools close by working with timber than parts. But I can see this working well with electronics enthusiasts. If you use aluminium angle instead of timber between those tackle boxes, you'd probably get one of two more in there as well. It will add to the cost, but you gain extra storage. Nice project - thanks for sharing.

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    • Cheap DIY DDS Function/Signal Generator
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  • Actually, it never came in a case (unless you wanted to buy it in a small box at an inflated price), but yes basically chucking it in a bench case as I explained. A lot quicker buying the module than spending even more to designing it yourself.

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