author
5Instructables8,012Views4CommentsJoined July 27th, 2015

Tell us about yourself!

Complete Your Profile

Achievements

  • REARLab commented on REARLab's instructable IR Proximity Wheelchair Controller6 months ago
    IR Proximity Wheelchair Controller

    No problems, apologies for the late reply. This project was for a student who needed a new way to operate their wheelchair. Alternative efforts, including eye tracking, sip and puff, and joysticks, had not worked out for them. The goal was for the student to begin by being able to turn and face who they were talking to, and if that worked well graduate to full directional control.

    This was an orphan project that took place over a school semester led by an undergraduate at Georgia Tech. Unfortunately there was only one copy made for a specific elementary student.

    View Instructable »
  • REARLab's instructable Bike Motivator's weekly stats: 1 year ago
    • Bike Motivator
      722 views
      9 favorites
      2 comments
  • REARLab commented on REARLab's instructable Bike Motivator1 year ago
    Bike Motivator

    Hi Connie, thanks for your feedback! We've tried downloaded and extracting the files on a few computers, Windows and Macs, and have had no problems. Can you explain what the issue is on your end so we can help fix it?

    View Instructable »
  • REARLab commented on REARLab's instructable IR Proximity Wheelchair Controller1 year ago
    IR Proximity Wheelchair Controller

    Apologies for the late reply, we just finished relocating to a new space.The IR sensors were designed with the intent to be used by the person in the chair, however an assistant has the opportunity to kill the sensors should something go wrong and stop all movement. This particular chair has 4 driver modes, and we set one of them to accept this form of control. The pucks allow for multiple configurations and easy storage. The entire unit is basically held in place by velcro.The student this was designed for lacks fine motor control and had attempted joystick, capacitive, and eye tracking forms of control without much success. We are currently awaiting more feedback as the new semester begins on the success of this attempt, but the goal was to facilitate left/right turning so the student...

    see more »

    Apologies for the late reply, we just finished relocating to a new space.The IR sensors were designed with the intent to be used by the person in the chair, however an assistant has the opportunity to kill the sensors should something go wrong and stop all movement. This particular chair has 4 driver modes, and we set one of them to accept this form of control. The pucks allow for multiple configurations and easy storage. The entire unit is basically held in place by velcro.The student this was designed for lacks fine motor control and had attempted joystick, capacitive, and eye tracking forms of control without much success. We are currently awaiting more feedback as the new semester begins on the success of this attempt, but the goal was to facilitate left/right turning so the student could face different people in class without need of an assistant. Pending that outcome, eventually transition to full directional control.We began this project with much the same intent as your own (they look great), to give functionality to someone on a reasonable budget. I will attempt to monitor this feed more closely if you have any more questions.

    View Instructable »
  • REARLab's instructable IR Proximity Wheelchair Controller's weekly stats: 1 year ago
    • IR Proximity Wheelchair Controller
      644 views
      9 favorites
      1 comments