author2
6Instructables242,999Views583CommentsKyle, TX (South of Austin)
I like to create YouTube videos and have a channel. I also like to work with CNC, electronics, and I build robots. It's been awhile, but another hobby is high powered rockets.

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Earthjustice United States of Efficiency Contest
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  • Footswitch Operated Sandblasting System

    When properly installed, there is NO bleed while the foot switch is connected. When you step on the footswitch, the air in the pinch-valve bladder bleads out in about 1/2 second then it should be stable again. When you take your foot off, the bladder will fill in 1/2 second and it will be silent again. If not, you have the footswitch connected incorrectly and/or you need to apply teflon tape on your connections.

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  • EFM8BB1 Kinetic Light Triangles

    The project is good... nicely done... but what REALLY got my attention was the Toaster Oven Conversion! You should do an Instructable on just that topic! I know I want to build one now!!!

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  • askjerry commented on jiripraus's instructable See-Through Arduino UNO
    See-Through Arduino UNO

    I've learned two things...1) You have mad soldering skills.2) You crazy!That is some incredible work... great job!

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  • Make Your Own Oscilloscope(Mini DSO) With STC MCU Easily

    Excellent job! Your video work is very good, overall one of the best presented projects on the site. thank you!

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  • Footswitch Operated Sandblasting System

    Honestly... She bought a unit for $10,000 and I was like... Are you kidding?? So I duplicated it for under $1000. I just used the same parts they did. Feel free to experiment!

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  • Footswitch Operated Sandblasting System

    The compressor needs to produce at least 8 CFM and get to at least 125 PSI. I used a 3/4 inch hose from the compessor to the moisture trap. From there it was 1/2 inch OD to the valves and I beleive 3/8 to the foot switch hose connectors.

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  • Footswitch Operated Sandblasting System

    Honestly I do not remember. She bought a box of ceramic tops for the holder that she had... bought the whole thing for like $10K (She was WAY overcharged for what she got... but of course I wasn't smart enough to ask until after the purchase.) I believe it was about 1/4 inch or so... but I couldn't tell you. I looked at the setup they used, tracked down the pinch valve, and figured it all out from examination. Decided to save others the trouble.

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  • askjerry commented on jbumstead's instructable Upright Laser Harp
    Upright Laser Harp

    Very nice design! Thanks!

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  • How to Make a Realistic Faux Neon Sign - Super Bright!

    I have not built this, so it is speculation... however, I have experience with plastic tubing. (And I have made neon signs before as it happens.) If you have access to a heat gun, you can soften the plastic tubing to a point where it will flex and bend quite easily... just don't get it to the point where it frosts.For attachment, you can also use clear RTV silicone to hold it into place. This takes about 15-20 minutes to cure, so you will likely have to use weights to hold the tubing into place during that time... and you may need to do one or two letters at a time. Alternately... you can get black RTV which would seal the gaps from the rear and could improve the look slightly more.If all that fails... you can use two layers of board... one with a slightly wider letter such that the two l…

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    I have not built this, so it is speculation... however, I have experience with plastic tubing. (And I have made neon signs before as it happens.) If you have access to a heat gun, you can soften the plastic tubing to a point where it will flex and bend quite easily... just don't get it to the point where it frosts.For attachment, you can also use clear RTV silicone to hold it into place. This takes about 15-20 minutes to cure, so you will likely have to use weights to hold the tubing into place during that time... and you may need to do one or two letters at a time. Alternately... you can get black RTV which would seal the gaps from the rear and could improve the look slightly more.If all that fails... you can use two layers of board... one with a slightly wider letter such that the two layers form a deeper channel... thus giving the hot glue or RTV a better bite on the material as the adhesion area would be wider.I hope that helps.

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  • askjerry commented on jiripraus's instructable Freeform LED Sphere
    Freeform LED Sphere

    This is an exceptional instructable! The project is excellent, the video work outstanding, and the instructions are extremely clear. One of the best presentations I have seen. thanks!

    This is an exceptional instructable! The project is excellent, the video work outstanding, and the instructions are extremely clear. One of the best presentations I have seen. thanks!

    This is an exceptional instructable! The project is excellent, the video work outstanding, and the instructions are extremely clear. One of the best presentations I have seen. thanks!

    This is an exceptional instructable! The project is excellent, the video work outstanding, and the instructions are extremely clear. One of the best presentations I have seen. thanks!

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  • Fluid Bridge Rectifier

    I like it... a great teaching aid!AWESOME!

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  • Low Cost DIY CNC Router

    I really like your design, the linear bearings are a nice, inexpensive way to go for a woodworking machine. I also like the cable management... simple and effective. the only tip I can really offer you is to replace the router with a 4-bearing spindle. The routers pull air through them and as such get sawdust in them, and they make a lot of noise. An air-cooled spindle is amazingly quiet and as it is a closed system, impervious to dust. Additionally, with the right controller, or a manual control... you can adjust the cutting speed to match your materials better. get better wear on your cutters and the machine. SPINDLE VS ROUTER

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  • Slippery When Wet Skateboard

    Ok... that made me smile! Great Project!

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  • How to Make a Optocoupler (Vactrol)

    This is my "go to" part... I order 25 at a time. :-)

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  • Spring Making / Wire Bending Machine

    Of course. If I can be of any help let me know.You may be interested in my YouTube page as well.

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  • Spring Making / Wire Bending Machine

    Looking at your device, the head could be semi-automatically homed. It won't hurt a stepper to stall, so you could command a G1F3X90 for example... (X being large enough that it will cause contact, F being large enough that it isn't a hard crash.) the head would slowly rotate to the point where it could not any more... going click...click... click... and end up at a known position. Then... rotate the machine back a known amount to the zero point. From there use a G10L20X0Z0P0 to set that point as the new home. (I used G-Code for LinuxCNC... but I think the Gerbal set uses the G10L20 command.)Yup... it does: https://github.com/paulusjacobus/Gerbil/wikiHopefully this is helpful.

    For this machine there is only a need to learn a few limited G-Code instructions.For the guy above who doesn't like metric, issue a G20 for SAE or a G21 for Metric.For movement you only need G0 to G1 each will move the X-Axis (rotate the head in this case) by some distance. The G0 is movement at the fastest rate the machine can do, the G1 is where you can specify a speed. G1 X5 F5 would move the head 5 units at 5 units per minute... so you can control the speed.If you put in G1 Z10 F5 then the wire would feed out 10mm at 5mm per minute. Or if you set the machine to G20 (SAE) it would go 5 inches at 5 inches per minute.Other than that... G90 says move in absolute mode... so if you had kicked out 5mm of wire and issued a G0 Z1 command... it would suck 4mm of wire back into the machine. (Or …

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    For this machine there is only a need to learn a few limited G-Code instructions.For the guy above who doesn't like metric, issue a G20 for SAE or a G21 for Metric.For movement you only need G0 to G1 each will move the X-Axis (rotate the head in this case) by some distance. The G0 is movement at the fastest rate the machine can do, the G1 is where you can specify a speed. G1 X5 F5 would move the head 5 units at 5 units per minute... so you can control the speed.If you put in G1 Z10 F5 then the wire would feed out 10mm at 5mm per minute. Or if you set the machine to G20 (SAE) it would go 5 inches at 5 inches per minute.Other than that... G90 says move in absolute mode... so if you had kicked out 5mm of wire and issued a G0 Z1 command... it would suck 4mm of wire back into the machine. (Or try to.) If you issued a G91 then the same G0 Z1 command... it would be read as... "From where you are now...kick out another 1mm of wire."Since there is no spindle or coolant... and no other axis to interact with... those are pretty much all you need to play with for whatever you want to do.Great machine... but I would have calibrated the head so that the rotation angle is known... then issuing a G0 X90 would give the proper rotation... and you could possibly have an easier time calculating head movements.

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  • How to Make a Optocoupler (Vactrol)

    That is a pretty good example of opto-isolation, but it does use a variable resistor. Typically a phototransistor is used which does a few of things that this model does not.1) It is very fast acting.2) It typically carries a bit more current.3) It can be triggered electrically if desired.Take a look at my favorite... the 4N35 optocoupler. You can connect the LED and the two phototransistor outputs... but there is also a base that allows for electrically switching the device on if desired.RE: https://www.vishay.com/docs/81181/4n35.pdf

    Nice tutorial... now you need to do a comparison with something like the 4N35 to show the typical form-factor in the electronics world. (I use them all the time... a lot.)

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  • How to Make a Punch Bag Wall Bracket Using Scaffold Poles

    This is an excellent design... looks good, simple to build, and very functional.

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  • askjerry commented on tobychui's instructable DIY Budget 3D Scanner V3
    DIY Budget 3D Scanner V3

    I appreciate the work you put into this... but as I look through your Instructabe, I cannot find any samples of something you have scanned, or see any 3D printed objects from a scan. There are many types of 3D scanning methods, some work MUCH better than others. Without a sample of what can be done with your system the reader is left to build the entire project with the hopes it works well. can you please update this instructible to show hat the output looks like, if you had to do any manual post-processing, and how your finished product turned out?

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  • In your BOM you have "Greenhouse"... viewers would likely find it better if you listed a link to the one you used... that would at least take them to the same manufacturer so they would know the quality is good. (Assume positive intent.)

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  • I have been on instructables for at least a decade now... and i must say... in all that time... this was the most facinating one i have ever seen. Outstanding job... very interesting!

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  • Nice... I'll have to look into that camera. Alternately... if you have your cell phone with the GoPro App... you could use that... I've tested it up to 400 feet.

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  • Since I didn't see anything attached tot he GoPro, I presume you are simply using the GoPro App to view the video on-the-fly. Nice build... I like that all the major parts can be printed... and I like the use of the magnets to close the cover. Nicely done.

    I must have missed the section where you showed how to wire up the camera and what software to use... I'll have to read it over again after work. Thanks.

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  • To my knowledge no... I haven't done anything with this page in a few years. the main thing to remember is how the pinch valve works. Normally a footswitch is pressed and THEN supplies air pressure... we plumb it backward so that it supplies air UNTIL it is pressed... then it allows air to bleed out of the valve which allows the mixture to flow. That is the main part people get wrong and comment/email me about.

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  • I believe that this is the first Instructable I have seen from you... wonderful project!I have a friend who has that exact VW bus... if I get the time... I absolutely must build it.Thank you for sharing!

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  • I am not sure what you are asking. The pipes I have are standard 3/4" or 1" PVC plumbing pipes. The connection between the pump and the input to the pipes is simply plastic tubing as the manufacturer calls for. (Look at your pump specification sheet.)The PVC has 1/8 inch (2m) holes drilled every 4 inches or so (100mm) for the water to drain out of. Above those holes are 1/4 inch (6mm) holes to allow string to be threaded down and held with a knot.Water fills the PVC, and trickles down the string to the plants. Or, you may omit the string, and let it drip... your choice.

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  • This is brilliant! I must travel 20-40 times a year... and my Android phone just won't cut it on a plane ride when I'm in a seat near the engines... I've always wished i could just get that extra 10% audio... this should do it perfectly. You are a genus... I have to build two immediately! THANK YOU!

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  • askjerry commented on -BALES-'s instructable The QUIK-TUBE Snare Drum

    Ok I'll say it... this is the BEST produced Instructable that I have ever seen.it is crisp, well written, and the videos are FABULOUS. ...I mean seriously... the way I wish my videos would be... AWESOME JOB!

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  • The signal is a simple VHF frequency... so the better the antenna, the more signal you would pick up. The rabbit ears would work well I think... just remember that they need to lay flat as the signal is coming from overhead (vertically) not horizintally. If the amplifier is designed for that frequency range... it may help as well.

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  • Wow... never thought of that... I suppose I could modify the hat-pins and not drift too far from the Alice in Wonderland Mad Hatter theme... possible project...

    This is absolutely ~AWESOME~ ! ! !Why has nobody ever thought of this??? There are little carpenter sets, doctor sets, mechanic... but I have never seen anything like this before. I one thought about scaling up a circuit board and making some wall art... but this is both ART and a TOY. Marvelous! Oh yeah... I VOTED for this one... oh yeah! People.. you really need to vote on this one... outstanding! Now I gotta build one. I think I feel a CNC project and a YouTube video for my channel in the works... with proper attribution of course!

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  • I have seen a lot of instructables... I've written a few as well... but I must say, this is one of the best I have ever seen in terms of a clean design, very innovative, and extremely well thought out components. I love the way you mounted the bearings and the belt attachment points... brilliant! (And I'm stealing that idea!!)

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  • Ok... now that is clever!AWESOME!

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  • Lowe's... the real trick is to have NO SHARP BENDS after the T-connector. I have a piece of wood dowel taped to the first 20 inches to keep it straight.

    The pressure to the foot switch needs to be 20 to 40 pounds HIGHER than what is in the pressure pot. Remember, the pinch valve must hold back the flow from the pot... if it has less pressure than the pot, it can't do that. Eve was running the pressure pot at 40psi, and the foot switch at 60 psi.

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  • askjerry commented on zimitt's instructable Spot Weld Plastic

    I love you method... and I will definately give it a try... but i would be remis if i didn't mention just one thing...:- )https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bt9zSfinwFA

    Ah yes... perfect, very clear... great!

    You may be seeing an advertisement... Vertical Video Syndrome - A PSA Being playful about the camera orientation... Try again if you like....

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  • That is what I call a PRO LEVEL Instructable!Great layout, nice images, incredible project... the whole thing is first class!

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  • askjerry commented on gzumwalt's instructable Hummingbird

    This project is AMAZING!VOTED! AWESOME!

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  • First, I really like the way you used the collet nut for the reflector. I'm working on a project where i am having issues with reflections off a cylinder at the top of my router... this could solve those issues for me.Next... you may want to consider this sensor... pee-manufactured, and because of the angle, it has a clearly defined focal area. (There are many similar ones... this is just an example.)https://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/tt-electronics-optek-technology/OPB703/365-1675-ND/1638026

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  • One of the best toolbox designs i have seen... definitely the best laser-cut box.Nicely done!

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  • That is a great build!Since you like the large dot format... you will probably also be interested in this... so you can make full color wall art. https://rasterbator.net/ Happy Printing!

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  • Not much to say except... IT WAS AWESOME!--> VOTED ! ! !

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  • askjerry commented on jtaggard's instructable Modular DIY CNC Machine

    Well... if you need any help with the configuration... or implementing a custom panel let me know and I'll help as much as I can.

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  • askjerry commented on jtaggard's instructable Modular DIY CNC Machine

    Routers... let me just explain it this way... ROUTER vs. SPINDLE The router is similar to the dremel tool... designed with active air cooling... which is noisy. In the video above that is a 2.2kW spindle... the 500W I recommended is fairly powerful for it's size. We have cut 1/4 inch (6mm) aluminum with it... with pretty good results. If you ever want more control and features than the controller you are using now... take a look at LinuxCNC which is free. I have a whole series about that on my YouTube channel. (Frankenlab and Monster Mill) Jerry

    Also... try one of these as a cutting bit. Be careful... they are EXTREMELY sharp... they cut aluminum pretty well also. (Use air assist.)

    https://www.banggood.com/18-Inch-Shank-Single-Flute-End-Mill-Cutter-Tungsten-Steel-CNCPCB-Engraving-Bit-3_175x22mm-p-1038973.html

    You may wish to consider using a 500w spindle instead of the dremel tool. They are not really designed to run for long periods of time, and they don't hold a tight tolerance as they were designed to be hand-held. Amazon has some really nice units with a power supply for about $135 or so. (110 Euro)https://www.amazon.com/Spindle-Cooled-Milling-Converter-Engraving/dp/B01LNBOCDAYou also have the advantage that you can program a PWM output and filter it to an A/D signal to allow full speed control from G-Gode. And... they are at least 1/4 the noise levels as the dremel tools.

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  • I absolutely LOVE the way you created the glowing parts... the diffusion of the paper is perfect. Sad to say... I'm stealing that technique for one of my projects!(Grin)

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  • I was looking over your plans again and saw one thing that you may want to pay some attention to... probably fine... but worth noting. In some areas you have steel directly bolted to aluminum. The difference in metals may lead to galvanic corrosion... caused by different electrical characteristics.In short... if using different metals in contact with each other... an insulator should be used to prevent issues. If interested, ADDITIONAL READING.

    Very nice build.I have built several CNC machines, and I have a playlist on YouTube called Frankenlab where I pass along things I've learned. For anyone interested in making their own machine, one thing to think about is to lay out your controllers, power supplies, etc onto a "drawer". I have a plate that can be pulled out for maintenance. This means I don't need to fuss too much for maintenance or to add new features.I seriously wish i had used this method on my Monster Mill as getting to some of the wiring now can be a pain. When I build my next machine... possibly based very closely on your design here... I'll be sure to make the electronics accessible like that.By the way... I VOTED for you... good luck! ~ Jerry

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  • askjerry commented on nicengineering's instructable Low Budget CNC

    Nice small scale machine!I think it's great that you built a machine that is portable and yet ridged enough to do tasks like PCB, etc. There are a couple of things you may want to consider as options however... instead of a Dremel or similar cutter, you may want to consider a 500w Spindle. They are MUCH more quiet, marginally more expensive, and depending on the model you get, can be speed controlled from software for more accurate and consistent results.I'll post one example found on Amazon... but there are several others. This one uses a potentiometer for speed adjustment... so no further software changes would be required on your part.https://www.amazon.com/110-220V-Cooling-Adjustable...The other possible change is the use of LunixCNC as your drive software... it supports many more G-C…

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    Nice small scale machine!I think it's great that you built a machine that is portable and yet ridged enough to do tasks like PCB, etc. There are a couple of things you may want to consider as options however... instead of a Dremel or similar cutter, you may want to consider a 500w Spindle. They are MUCH more quiet, marginally more expensive, and depending on the model you get, can be speed controlled from software for more accurate and consistent results.I'll post one example found on Amazon... but there are several others. This one uses a potentiometer for speed adjustment... so no further software changes would be required on your part.https://www.amazon.com/110-220V-Cooling-Adjustable...The other possible change is the use of LunixCNC as your drive software... it supports many more G-Code commands, is free, and is highly configurable to include custom function buttons, etc.If you are interested, I have an entire video series on that subject: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLa_L8q5vezB...Keep up the great work!Jerry

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  • askjerry commented on JON-A-TRON's instructable Sheet Metal Fireplace

    @davidj31 - Zinc can have bad side effects...https://www.cdc.gov/niosh/docs/81-123/pdfs/0675.pd...Stainless steel is made with a higher carbon content and also contains chromium... therefore is more stable than regular mild steel. It is less likely to rust and remains shiny... therefore the nickname of "stainless" steel.https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stainless_steel

    @davidj31 - Zinc can have bas side effects...https://www.cdc.gov/niosh/docs/81-123/pdfs/0675.pd...Stainless steel is made with a higher carbon content and also contains chromium... therefore is more stable than regular mild steel. It is less likely to rust and remains shiny... therefore the nickname of "stainless" steel.https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stainless_steel

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  • Clickable Links...Flighthttps://www.facebook.com/tara.holancinhart/videos/10214275566030003/Official Videohttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dppeL1F9oA4Hint for others... type some text like ZIP LINE VIDEO then highlight that text... click on the link icon that pops up... and paste in your video link. Then you will have active links.

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  • Honestly I don't recall. I went to Lowe's and looked for a heavy rubber hose. The one I found worked. It may not be the hose however... when I first put this together for Eve, she had a couple of hoses blow... the problem was that the hose made a tight bend after the pressure pot. The hose has to leave the valve as straight as possible.I actually took a piece of aluminum "L" stock and tie-wrapped it to the hose... this way it remained straight and made only a slight loop upward to the blasting area. That solved the issue.

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  • It's called "ripstop" because every 5mm or so there is a thicker thread... it is used in parachutes... the thicker thread will stop the material from ripping. If you have a sewing machine, it is very easy to sew... one of my favorite cloth materials. (I sew) The colors are usually very vibrant too. More Information Here

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  • For the work with the electric motor I salute you!I do however think that you should sew a new body from yellow rip-stop nylon or polyester material. It will be much more flexible, and reactive. The pattern would be pretty simple... just a rectangle with two edges sewn together... then turn it inside-out.I think tee-shirt material would be too heavy at this scale... but the ripstop would probably work well. If you make one like that... post it!

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  • askjerry commented on tomatoskins's instructable Doughnut Chuck

    Sometimes you find an idea so simple that you wonder why you didn't think of it... this is one of those ideas!Outstanding!

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  • Sand.I have used heated sand before... we had a metal container with about 1.25 inches (30mm) of sand in it... this was placed over a heat source to get the temperature up. The board is placed on the sand... wiggle it into it a bit... wear gloves... and use a pair of needle-nose to start pulling parts.Obviously... don't take a chance with the fumes... we did it outside.Once on the heated sand, the components will loosen quickly and may be pulled loose. If it is a large board... you may not want to leave it in there a long time. We were generally only harvesting a few parts. I'm passing this idea along because I thought you might find it useful.

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  • A couple of options... print the tube running to the top with two chambers... one for fluid... one for the wires. The wire chamber doesn't need to be large... you can use 30ga for the LEDs.Or insert a smaller tube inside the larger tube... increase the larger tube by 1mm... brass or stainless tube inside.The other method... just string three 30ga up the glass at 120 degrees offset... it's so thin my would barely notice it... especially if the parts were printed in dark plastic.

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  • My only suggestion... relocate the LED ring to the top... other than that...FANTASTIC JOB!

    Yup... they came right up on AMAZON.

    goo.gl/XWACOa

    From Amazon

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  • Very nice build!I like the way you handled the steering in your design, clever and a very clean solution.

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  • askjerry commented on makendo's instructable Laser-powered Light Saber

    That is a really nice build!I was wondering if you printed a new cover that directed the air from the center plenum outward to each laser... and had a 10mm hole for each... printed slightly conically inside... if that would cause the air to exit at a very slightly higher pressure... and be more coherent. If it worked... the fog would stay together longer enhancing the effect more. Just a thought... all theory... but the only modification would be a new cover plate. Might be worth experimenting with?

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  • Using hard drive platters... wow... that's impressive. When I saw the first picture I thought you were going to say old CDs... that's pretty inginus my friend!

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  • Nice design... great job!

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  • Yes... the pressure settings are too close. the footswitch needs about 20psi more than the pressure pot. It needs to be able to really smash the pinch valve closed quickly... and likewise, it needs to be able to release quickly. When you let go of the footswitch, the air must be able to leave the bladder compartment to the atmosphere unencumbered.

    Look closely an you will see TWO regulators... the pot is set about 35-40 PSI, and the footswitch is set about 60 PSI... about 20 PSI higher... just don't go over the rated pressure for the bladder... you know... don't run it at 100 PSI for example.

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  • I was VERY EXCITED to see this Instructable... After experimenting with an ESP8862-201 module, I was able to get a single LED to turn on or off... and I wanted to be able to pass more than just "ON/OFF" to the device... to be able to specify a few things. I just downloaded your code and I'm hopeful that I can get it to where it has a series of CASE routines... if so... then I can do even more complex things. (Trigger robot sequences, etc.)If I do manage to build off your code... I will DEFINITELY make sure to credit you with the core code. Up until now... this was as far as I got.Simple ON/OFF project video.Thanks,Jerry

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  • If you look at the setup the way I have it... there is a main valve that supplies air to the entire system, then one for the pressure pot, and one for the footswitch/pinch valve.the reason is that you shut off the main air supply... and if you did nothing else... the system would bleed down and equalize... then all the air... and grit would shoot out the hose.The way i designed it... you go like this...1) System air2) Pinch Valve3) Pressure potThat way the pot isn't pressurized until the pinch valve is ready.Shutting down...1) Pressure pot... allow it to bleed down slightly bleed valve open if you have one. (Both pots are connected in my system... so I crack the second open and air bleeds out there.2) Pinch valve3) Main pressure valveHope that helps.

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  • That is awesome! When I had to design and build this... I thought to myself that someday... someone else is gonna want to do it... and that I may as well post the details and try to help them.So I'm really glad I was able to help!

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  • askjerry commented on JackmanWorks's instructable Epoxy Wire Bowl

    Very nicely done! I like the way the cables interact with the light and the transparent epoxy... great visual!One small suggestion... if you do that again... typical cables have a cord in them... grab it with a pair of pliers and pull... it will zip the insulation off in no time... then cut to length. (Save yourself some time.)

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  • askjerry commented on unclescrooge's instructable Build a CNC router

    First the conversion... 2.2kW is just under 3HP. WATT to HP GOOGLE CONVERSION If you look at my Frankenlabs series, I'm using a 500W spindle. It depends on how aggressive you want to cut... the 2.2KW are very powerful. And the prices have really come down. Yours looks about the same as a 1.5Kw or 2 HP spindle. I saw some 1.5KW water cooled for about $220. including the drive electronics. You send out PWM and get full speed control from LinuxCNC or Mach. The 500W that I'm using cost me about $150 including all the electronics... and it's air cooled. (Much more quiet than a router.) Check out my video of it in action... Remember... if you need help usually (unless I'm traveling for work) I can set up a Skype or Google hangouts to assist you. Good Luck!

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  • askjerry commented on unclescrooge's instructable Build a CNC router

    Very nice job... and the enclosure holds much of the mess as well. I will point out one thing you may be interested in however... at some point you may want to switch to a spindle instead of the router. I have a short video to show the difference... I'm showing a water cooled version... but the air cooled are just as quiet. They use the holding fixture as a heat sink. Is there really a big difference in sound? SPINDLE VS. ROUTERI think so.Jerry

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  • diverdale: I'm actually thinking of getting this one... 12 watts.12 W LASER

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  • I am surprised you didn't mount the LED panel to the back of the frame to help protect the LEDs. This would also allow you to place a frosted sheet of acrylic to the front to help diffuse the light if needed, or to add color gels for different effects.Flicker: I saw the flicker at the 56 second point that was described below... it may have been caused by the panel, or by other light sources as it was not apparent in the video comparison. Installing a large capacitor across the output would help smooth the power out a bit more if needed.Overall... given the very low cost of this project... I think he did an outstanding job.

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  • Tip: You can click the little marker on your comment and select "EDIT" if you make a mistake.

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  • OMG! Someone else knows about Letraset... today's "kids" will never know... HOURS to lay out a board... trying not to get the little cracks which meant you had to flow solder over them... Did you know that you can STILL GET them?

    EXCELLENT INSTRUCTABLE !I've made circuit board for years... but have not done the solder mask or tinning... I didn't know you could get a solution to coat the copper like that... excellent tips!Thank you!Jerry

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  • I have a suggestion... before attaching the legs to the project, cut two identical lengths of black heat-shrink tubing and slide over the lower parts of the lamp. Heat to shrink, then install the legs. This will give a clean black to silver transition to the project, and help to hide the wires leading into the lamp.An alternate idea... which would perhaps look better, would be to fabricate legs from a nice hardwood stained a dark color. The leg on the side of the electrical connections could be routed to conceal the wires and contain the power switch. It could be held on with small wood screws and would facilitate easy repairs if needed in the future.

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  • Nice idea... looks great in a shop!

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  • askjerry commented on rschoenm's instructable Nested Helix

    That is pretty neat... and with as much CNC as I do... i never would have thought of mounting an assembly to my saw... until now. Very impressive!

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