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9Instructables27,094Views36CommentsJoined March 8th, 2011
I'm the guy in the back of the warehouse who fixes all the stuff that people break. Right around those shelves full of parts and newly broken things. Theater lighting is my day job.

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  • dalesql commented on Aron Hoekstra's instructable Fiber Optic Panel Star Ceiling7 months ago
    Fiber Optic Panel Star Ceiling

    Years of working in theater and video production. We are constantly assembling cable bundles for productions, and taking them back apart to return to the rental companies. Doing this with a dozen cables, ranging from the thin cables used for sending control and the inch or so diameter cables carrying the dozens of power circuits for all those lights, at a couple hundred feet long. this requires a really long hallway or clear space in a warehouse, a couple hours of maddening tedium to disentagle and coil up.

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  • Home Carbonation System for Water, Beer, and More

    I did a very similar system myself a few years ago. Wrote the instructable on it also. Alas my system was destroyed in a house fire last year, and the surviving pieces and parts are probably only good for scrap metal now. Once the house is rebuilt, rebuilding my seltzer system is definitely on the list. Seriously considering putting in a permanent seltzer tap in the kitchen somehow. Maybe piping carbonated water in via the regular icemaker and water dispenser line? Have to be sure there are no brass or copper components in the fridge water lines though. https://www.instructables.com/id/Seltzer-water-for...The only thing I'd really change is for the check valve not to be made from brass. Use plastic or stainless steel instead. Carbonated water is a weak acid, and it will leac...

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    I did a very similar system myself a few years ago. Wrote the instructable on it also. Alas my system was destroyed in a house fire last year, and the surviving pieces and parts are probably only good for scrap metal now. Once the house is rebuilt, rebuilding my seltzer system is definitely on the list. Seriously considering putting in a permanent seltzer tap in the kitchen somehow. Maybe piping carbonated water in via the regular icemaker and water dispenser line? Have to be sure there are no brass or copper components in the fridge water lines though. https://www.instructables.com/id/Seltzer-water-for...The only thing I'd really change is for the check valve not to be made from brass. Use plastic or stainless steel instead. Carbonated water is a weak acid, and it will leach the copper out of brass if left in contact. The copper is a toxin, and will be readily absorbed into the body if dissolved in seltzer. This is not an issue with beer.

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  • dalesql commented on More Cowbell's instructable Easy Generator to Home Hook Up2 years ago
    Easy Generator to Home Hook Up

    This instructable should be put up in the FAQ as a template for how to do an instructable. Only quibble I have is that when you are working on your electrical panel, even after you have turned off the main breaker, the line side coming in from the electric company still has power on it. and those are exposed to the careless finger or metallic tool to find and create an instant arc welder when you least expect it. Other than that, excellent.

    First guess is that you nicked the insulation on one of your hot conductors and it is shorting to ground. Second guess is that you have a wire swap. This is common with homeowner rewire prjects, where the homeowner is red/green color blind and doesn't realize this is important.

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  • Inexpensive garage lights from LED strips

    Great project. But there is one gotcha that I fell into when I did a similar project for undercabinet lighting in my kitchen. I stuck them directly to the wood and also discovered that the adhesive was wimpy. I happened to have some 3M VHB double sided tape and stuck them up with that. My original plan was to use a motion detector relay to turn them on when someone was in the kitchen, but after the relay failed (after I dropped it into the sink full of soapy water and dirty dishes. oops. ) I just left the lights on all the time as a night light as well. So, about a month or two later, I notice the leds are a LOT dimmer. Looking underneath I saw a bunch of dead LEDs. over the next couple weeks, pretty much all of them died. My best theory is that the wood and VHB tape a...

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    Great project. But there is one gotcha that I fell into when I did a similar project for undercabinet lighting in my kitchen. I stuck them directly to the wood and also discovered that the adhesive was wimpy. I happened to have some 3M VHB double sided tape and stuck them up with that. My original plan was to use a motion detector relay to turn them on when someone was in the kitchen, but after the relay failed (after I dropped it into the sink full of soapy water and dirty dishes. oops. ) I just left the lights on all the time as a night light as well. So, about a month or two later, I notice the leds are a LOT dimmer. Looking underneath I saw a bunch of dead LEDs. over the next couple weeks, pretty much all of them died. My best theory is that the wood and VHB tape acted as an insulator and the LEDs cooked themselves to premature death. I reinstalled one section with what I had left of the spool onto a piece of scrap sheet steel I had laying around. (Old PC case as it happens) and they ran for six months always on with no problem. Then there was a fire in the house and they were destroyed by the smoke and heat. As you are not going to be leaving these on all the time, you may not be affected, but if you do notice this failure, then sticking them to a hunk of sheet metal to act as a heat sink should solve the problem. and don't use a foamed double sided tape.

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