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Cyanoacrylate accelerators?

I just read about these substances that are usually sold in mini spray bottles or aerosol cans.  They are supposed to be very useful when you apply a cyanoacrylate (CA) glue (aka superglue, etc.) over a somewhat large, flat surface, as they enhance the alkaline conditions to speed up the polymerization of the CA.     Given this information, does anybody know if a CA accelerator can be made from scratch by regular high pH household materials, like ammonia or sodium hydroxide?  If so, what concentration do you think would work?

Question by jim5150jvc    |  last reply


How non-toxic is CA glue? Answered

Hi gang, I know CA glue (Krazy glue, Cyanoacrylate) is solvent based, and inhaling the solvent is bad for you, but how safe is it after the glue cures? As I understand it, after curing the glue is basically a plastic.  Can I use it in a baby's crib (Assuming it's allowed to cure)? Thanks!

Question by Morgantao    |  last reply


Mr Super Glue dies.

Harry Coover, accidental discoverer of Super Glue, has died in Tennessee, aged 94. Coover realised the adhesive potential of cyanoacrylate in 1951, when an assistant noticed that a piece of the material had firmly stuck two optical prisms together.

Topic by Kiteman    |  last reply


Which Glue/Adhesive Should I Use With EL Wire? Answered

Which Glue Should I Use With EL Wire? I want to glue some EL wire to glass, Which adhesive should I use? Which ones can you recommend? It would also be the best to use a clear adhesive My preferred ones are: Super Glue (cyanoacrylate) Hot Glue Clear Silicone

Question by Yonatan24    |  last reply


Removing Gorilla Glue From Skin Answered

   Has anyone found a way of removing the brown 'Original' Gorilla Glue from skin.  Earlier today I picked something up by the wrong side which I'd just coated in the stuff.  I've just spent 20 minutes washing and scrubbing my hands as per their FAQs and have just about lost the stuff, but has anyone come up with a miracle way of removing it? Note that this is the brown foaming polyurethane glue; not the cyanoacrylate type.

Question by AndyGadget    |  last reply


super SPEEDY glue

Super glue. Good stuff. A bit slow sometimes. Baking soda speeds it up. But I want it clear.  I don't have accelerator. I think I could get some on the far side of town, but don't know someplace close to buy it. Internet says moisture cures it. I don't find this to be true. Internet says heat, air movement, UV.  At the moment, my project is sittin in the sun, which gives all 3 things, but there's no control group.  Qs What sorta place sells accelerator for cyanoacrylate? Which techniques have sped you along with it before?

Topic by Toga_Dan    |  last reply


Glueing Plastics Together? Answered

When I say plastics, I mean more specifically, LEGOs. I'm glueing them together because I'm trying to make LEGO headphones, so I would need something permanent. I've heard people using cyanoacrylates and clear plumbing glue (anyone heard of Oatey?) I thought about using hot glue, but I'm not sure if that would give me the bond that I'm looking for. Would Gorilla Glue work too? Or would it be a bit of an overkill? I simply need a glue that will hold the LEGOs through enough wear-and-tear to last, and no discolouring of the pieces. And when I glue, should I glue the sides of the pieces together, or put glue around the dotted studs on the tops of the bricks? Any other glues or advice that you could enlighten me with would be greatly appreciated. :)

Question by Justin Lam    |  last reply


Snake species vs vivarium size? [sorted - thanks for your efforts]

I have finally persuaded my wife that we "need" a snake, and she has agreed to something in the general area of a corn snake (at least, that's how I'm interpreting "the smaller the better, and don't you dare buy a python!"). I was going to go down the route of choose a snake then choose the right vivarium, when it occurred to me that the ideal location for me would be on a particular shelf. I have the necessary skills to construct a vivarium, but it would be an odd size compared to others - approx 75cm across the front, 25cm tall and 25cm deep. So, is there a snake that would be happy in a tank of these dimensions? There is also the option of removing a shelf and having the tank twice as tall, so it could potentially have two floors with a hole between (and probably some sort of climbing branch up through the hole). (On a slightly related note, are there any health reasons against using cyanoacrylate super glue in parts of the construction? I would, of course, give the glue plenty of time to cure & air before adding the resident.) An extra condition has been added - it had better not be smelly.  Are snakes smelly on a day-to-day basis?

Question by Kiteman    |  last reply


Hack your Servo V1.00: Make a powerful linear actuator using a standard hobby Servo

Hack your Servo V1.00: Make a powerful linear actuator using a standard hobby Servo   Provided you have the tools and the servo you can built this for under a couple of bucks. The actuator extends with a rate of about 50mm/min. It is rather slow but very powerful. Watch my video at the end of the post where the small actuator lifts 10kg vertically.   Materials List Tools list   - hobby servo - standard hobby brass tubing             -OD: 4.0mm, ID: 3.4mm             -OD: 5.8mm, ID: 4.5mm - standard hobby styrene tubing                                                 -OD: 4.8mm, ID: 3.5mm - M4 studding - 2 x M5 washers - 2 x M4 nuts - 5 minute epoxy - cyanoacrylate - grease - multi-strand cables - heat-shrink tubing   - standard tools – screwdrivers, scalpel, files etc. - dremmel multi-tool with ceramic abrasive disk, or similar - hand-drill + 4.9mm + 2.5mm drill-bits - M3 tap - M4 tap - soldering iron - glue gun - small vice - small saw - sanding paper (relatively fine) - small flame torch         http://www.01mech.com/sites/default/files/images/material_tools.jpg Procedure - I will be giving instructions based on the dimensional parameters of the Hitec HS-300. The procedure remains the same for any type servo. I strongly recommend you read the whole post before you start. So lets make a start, shall we?   - Open your hobby servo, remove control electronics, feedback potentiometer and mechanical stop on the servo’s output gear.   - Solder new cables on the servo motor’s leads.   - Drill two 4.9mm holes on the servo case bottom cover. These should be located longitudinally along the centre line and 9.5 mm from each end (this applies on the Hitec HS-300 and is also true for many standard servos but depending on your servo type there might be differences). The M4 thread will come out from the servo body using one of these two so this hole must be located directly below the centre of rotation of the servo’s output gear. Be very careful since this alignment is very important! If you don’t get it right you might have to use a new servo! The more accurate you are, the longer your servo will endure.     http://www.01mech.com/sites/default/files/images/bottomCover_potHead.jpg -  Measure the dimensions of the rotating shaft of the potentiometer on the servo’s original electronics – note the geometry in general. The shaft should be flattened right at the tip in order to prevent it from freely-rotating once inserted into the servo’s output gear.   - Take the M4 studding (M4 thread) pick one end and by using the dremmel and the abrasive wheel tool, replicate the tip of the servo’s potentiometer on that end. Start by decreasing the diameter of the thread, rotating it steadily by hand against the abrasive disk (normally to 3.5mm in diameter and at least 6mm in length). Try to think of your fingers as the chuck of a slow-turning lathe. Once the diameter of the thread is down to the pot’s shaft diameter, flatten the tip according to the potentiometer’s tip. The idea is that the thread must be inserted in the servo’s output gear in the same way the potentiometer did before. The better the fit the longer your servo will endure.     http://www.01mech.com/sites/default/files/images/thread_modofication.jpg - On the flat tip of the M4 thread, screw the two M4 nuts approximately 20mm down its length. Following that, insert the two M5 washers. - Insert the thread inside the servo and adjust the distance of the nuts and washers down the thread such that the servo case bottom cover closes properly and the motor rotates efficiently. Basically, you have to make sure that once the thread and the servo are assembled there is no pressure between the servo case bottom cover and the nut-washer assembly. Similarly, you have to make sure that once the thread and the servo are assembled there is no gap between the servo case bottom cover and the nut-washer assembly. Once again, the better the fit the more your linear actuator will endure.   - Once you find the optimum position carefully disassemble the servo, remove the washers from the thread and use a drop of cyanoacrylate on the side of the nut that was in contact with the washers in the assembly. Let the glue to settle for 5 minutes. Unscrew the second nut by 10mm towards the flat end of the thread, and prepare a small epoxy mix.   - Put the mix between the two nuts and screw the second nut back in place. Once in place also use some epoxy on the back of the second nut as well. Ideally you should sand all contacting areas before you apply the epoxy glue. Leave to settle for at least 6 hours (even if you use a 5 min epoxy).     http://www.01mech.com/sites/default/files/images/copper_thread.jpg - Secure tightly the 4mm diameter brass tube onto a vice by flattening the mounting end and use the M4 tap VERY carefully tapping as deep as possible (at least 15mm). Using the dremmel cut 10mm out of the threaded part of the tube and then verify that the created thread runs along the whole length of the small threaded tube by screwing it onto an M4 screw. Keep the 4mm threaded tube on the screw for handling purposes. Apply a layer of solder on the outside surface.     http://www.01mech.com/sites/default/files/images/thread_solder.jpg - Take the 5.8mm diameter brass tube pick one end and try to sand at least 5mm into the tube (on the inside). Mount the brass tubing on the vice without squishing it and apply a thin layer of solder on the inside.   - Ignite the flame torch, take the 4mm threaded tube (holding it by the screw) and move it on the soldered end of the 5.8mm diameter brass tube which should still be mounted on the vice. Using the flame torch heat-up both tubes and carefully insert the 4mm threaded tubing inside the 5.8mm tubing until is fully inside. Use a pair of pliers and insert the brass tube by holding the end of the screw that sticks out. Hold the threaded tube levelled inside the 5.8mm tube until the solder settles. If you do not have a flame torch use a candle, your soldering iron and your patience :). Remove the screw. The end result will be the cylinder of your linear actuator.     http://www.01mech.com/sites/default/files/images/thread_cylinder.jpg - The cylinder length should be equal to: the actuator’s desired working length (stroke) + length of the 4mm threaded tube which is inside the 5.8mm tube + 10mm for the mounting hinge at the cylinder end.   - The thread length should be: the actuator’s desired working length (stroke) + length of threaded tube which is inside the 5.8mm tube + length of the thread which resides inside the servo casing, which is model-dependant.   - Take the non-threaded/non-soldered side of the cylinder and drill a 2.5mm hole through, 5mm from the tip.     http://www.01mech.com/sites/default/files/images/cylinder_heatShrink.jpg - Cover the entire length of the cylinder with heat-shrinking tube and cut-off any excess bits. The 2.5mm through holes made earlier on the non-threaded side of the cylinder are now covered. Use the drill again to expose them and tap them through, using the M3 tap. Screw a 20mm long M3 studding or simply cut-off the head of a 20mm long M3 screw. This will act as your cylinder mounting hinge.   - Take the 4.8mm styrene tubing and M4 tap it 10mm deep. Cut a small ring 5mm in length and screw it in the M4 thread fully, from the side of the nut that was in contact with the washers (long side of the M4 thread). This will act as bushing between the thread and the servo’s case bottom cover. Ideally you should use nylon, copper or metal bushing.     http://www.01mech.com/sites/default/files/images/thread_servo.jpg - Secure the motor cables inside the servo casing using a glue-gun and use heat-shrinking tube to cover them. Assemble the servo including the thread, the styrene bushing and the washers.   - Screw-on the cylinder and you are good to go! Here is a video of the small actuator lifting 10kg For those of you that have watched my video on the MTR Rover     will understand where the idea of hacking the servo came from ;))   Soon we will be posting assembly instructions, code and schematics on how to modify a standard servo to get full PID speed and position control with 10-bit resolution over 360 degrees – continuous ;)     I look forward for your comments!    

Topic by Antonb    |  last reply