Penolopy Bulnick Leaving Instructables Staff

That's right.  It is time for Penolopy Bulnick to move on.  Who is this Penolopy Bulnick fella? Well, even if you don't know who I am, I have been around for the past few years, lurking in the shadows.  I chit chat with all of you through comments, I help those of you who have trouble posting (even if you don't want the help), I release your awesome projects when they get caught in the filters, I post to our Tumblr, Facebook, Google+ and Pinterest pages, I create the newsletter you get 3 times a week, I help assemble and edit the print books we have done through Skyhorse Publishing, and I create crazy sugary projects in my spare time :) What are you going to do now?  Do you think you could actually get another job as awesome as Instructables? No :)  Nothing can replace the awesomeness that is Instructables and its community, but I'm sure going to try.  I don't have any finalized plans yet, but you may yet still see me around! I just wanted to let everyone know that even though I want to help you on the site forever, I will not be able to from now on :( I love you all. Goodbye :)  (after Friday, I'm still around till Friday) (I copied Scoochmaroo's use of a bye bye gif)

Topic by Penolopy Bulnick 4 years ago  |  last reply 4 years ago


Can I paint on shower tile?

I have a hardwater stains on my bathroom shower tile. I have tryed to cleen them but nothing.

Question by nicole irwin 9 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


Toothpick San Francisco

Artist Scott Weaver has built a model of San Francisco with a twist: it is made entirely out of toothpicks and glue. He estimates he used 100,000 toothpicks on the model, which includes a track on which ping-pong balls can roll down and 'visit' the city.Surprisingly, Instructables HQ does not seem to be included--must have been an oversight.PressDemocrat via SFist via my friend Nicole.Image from core77

Topic by joshf 10 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago


Instructables Visits the Exploratorium

Instructables got to sneak in to check out behind-the-scenes at the Exploratorium (which happens to be at Pier 15 which is right next door to the Instructables HQ) as well as entry into the After Dark Event: Transformations.  During the private tour we were able to get more information about specific exhibits as well as a see their Exhibit Development Shop. The next After Dark event will be Fog and it will defiantly be worth checking out.  And even if that doesn't work or you aren't old enough (After Dark is an adults only event) you should plan a day trip to the Exploratorium, there is so much to see! Warning: Overload of pictures to follow! Photos by Nicole and Audrey, Videos from Sherry.

Topic by Penolopy Bulnick 5 years ago  |  last reply 5 years ago


Skillshare email?

I received an email yesterday from a skillshare website. I have no idea why I was contacted and didn't know if this was a mass email that they somehow got the email addresses entered here in Instructables linked with our accounts. Anyone else get this or am I just special? Here it is below came across your project on Instructables, and I wanted to see if you might be interested in teaching on Skillshare. If you’re not familiar, Skillshare is an online learning platform where teachers share project-based tutorials with almost 1M students. Creating a great class does not take too much time and we have a partner program to compensate you. I would love to help you get started on Skillshare, the easiest way to get started is to head to www.skillshare.com/teach and fill in what you want to teach (you can always change the information later). Of course, if you have any questions, just reply back to this email.  Looking forward to hearing from you. Nicole

Topic by Haunted Spider 4 years ago  |  last reply 4 years ago


Pyrography Survey

Hello, My name is Nicole and I am an Industrial Design student from San Jose State University. I am currently working on a product redesign project for pyrography, specifically for the tool (i.e. solid-point burner). At this time I am conducting general research and collecting firsthand interviews with people (of any skill level) who have done pyrography. I have copied and pasted my questionnaire to craft forum, and I would greatly appreciate any contribution. Sincerely, Nicole San Jose State University – Industrial Design – Visualization III: Ergonomics/Human Factors Name: Occupation: Experience Level in Pyrography: (Please choose one, beginner, advanced, or professional) 1.      How did you become interested in pyrography? 2.      Do you do pyrography recreationally or professionally? 3.      How do you choose your pyrography projects? 4.      If professionally, how many hours do you work a day? (You may skip this question if it does not apply) 5.      How much time do you spend working on a project?  About how many hours a day? 6.      Where do you do your pyrography? Please be specific. (For example, if at home, where in your home?) 7.      What does your work area consist of? (For example, what kind of table and chair do you use? What kind of lighting?) 8.      What are your essential tools ready at your work area? 9.      Are there any DIY tools you have made? If so, what are they and what are they used for? 10.  Do you have any specific safety equipment? What kind of safety precautions do you practice? 11. What is your process of cleaning up? What do you use? 12. Do you have any injuries that affect you while working? If so, please describe. 13. What kind of tool do you use? (Please name the brand and model) 14. Do you have any specific complaints about the tool you are using? 15. If you could create a wishlist to make the perfect tool what would they be? Thank you for taking time out to participate in my survey. I truly value the information you have provided. Your responses are vital in helping me with my research for redesigning pyrography tools.

Topic by itisNicole 5 years ago  |  last reply 5 years ago


Do you have any experience in pyrography?

Hello, My name is Nicole and I am an Industrial Design student from San Jose State University. I am currently working on a product redesign project for pyrography, specifically for the tool (i.e. solid-point burner). At this time I am conducting general research and collecting firsthand interviews with people (of any skill level) who have done pyrography. I have copied and pasted my questionnaire to this, and I would greatly appreciate any contribution. Sincerely, Nicole San Jose State University – Industrial Design – Visualization III: Ergonomics/Human Factors Name: Occupation: Experience Level in Pyrography: (Please choose one, beginner, advanced, or professional) 1.      How did you become interested in pyrography? 2.      Do you do pyrography recreationally or professionally? 3.      How do you choose your pyrography projects? 4.      If professionally, how many hours do you work a day? (You may skip this question if it does not apply) 5.      How much time do you spend working on a project?  About how many hours a day? 6.      Where do you do your pyrography? Please be specific. (For example, if at home, where in your home?) 7.      What does your work area consist of? (For example, what kind of table and chair do you use? What kind of lighting?) 8.      What are your essential tools ready at your work area? 9.      Are there any DIY tools you have made? If so, what are they and what are they used for? 10.  Do you have any specific safety equipment? What kind of safety precautions do you practice? 11. What is your process of cleaning up? What do you use? 12. Do you have any injuries that affect you while working? If so, please describe. 13. What kind of tool do you use? (Please name the brand and model) 14. Do you have any specific complaints about the tool you are using? 15. If you could create a wishlist to make the perfect tool what would they be? Thank you for taking time out to participate in my survey. I truly value the information you have provided. Your responses are vital in helping me with my research for redesigning pyrography tools.

Question by itisNicole 5 years ago  |  last reply 5 years ago


Are you a contributing author to How to Fix Absolutely Anything by Instructables?

Are you a contributing author to: How to Fix Absolutely Anything”? I am a contributing author to the book “How to Fix Absolutely Everything, A Homeowner’s Guide” by Instructables. It is a book on home repairs sold at Amazon my article in it is on Oven Element Repair. I have an author’s page at Amazon and I was able to add “How to Fix Absolutely Anything: A Homeowner’s Guide by Instructables.com” to my authors credits as a contributing author. http://www.amazon.com/Josehf-Lloyd-Murchison/e/B00QAKE94W If you are a contributing author to the Instructables book and you have an author’s page just ask for it to be added. If you do not have an author’s page, go to this sight and create one and ask for How to Fix Absolutely Anything: A Homeowner’s Guide by Instructables.com and Nicole Smith to be added to your author’s profile so you can get the credit as a contributing author. https://authorcentral.amazon.com/ http://www.amazon.com/How-Fix-Absolutely-Anything-Homeowner%C2%92s/dp/1629141860

Topic by Josehf Murchison 4 years ago  |  last reply 4 years ago


Are you a contributing author to How to Fix Absolutely Anything by Instructables?

Are you a contributing author to: How to Fix Absolutely Anything”? I am a contributing author to the book “How to Fix Absolutely Everything, A Homeowner’s Guide” by Instructables. It is a book on home repairs sold at Amazon my article in it is on Oven Element Repair. I have an author’s page at Amazon and I was able to add “How to Fix Absolutely Anything: A Homeowner’s Guide by Instructables.com” to my authors credits as a contributing author. http://www.amazon.com/Josehf-Lloyd-Murchison/e/B00QAKE94W If you are a contributing author to the Instructables book and you have an author’s page just ask for it to be added. If you do not have an author’s page, go to this sight and create one and ask for How to Fix Absolutely Anything: A Homeowner’s Guide by Instructables.com and Nicole Smith to be added to your author’s profile so you can get the credit as a contributing author. https://authorcentral.amazon.com/ http://www.amazon.com/How-Fix-Absolutely-Anything-Homeowner%C2%92s/dp/1629141860

Question by Josehf Murchison 4 years ago  |  last reply 4 years ago


Are you a contributing author to How to Fix Absolutely Anything by Instructables?

Are you a contributing author to: How to Fix Absolutely Anything”? I am a contributing author to the book “How to Fix Absolutely Everything, A Homeowner’s Guide” by Instructables. It is a book on home repairs sold at Amazon my article in it is on Oven Element Repair. I have an author’s page at Amazon and I was able to add “How to Fix Absolutely Anything: A Homeowner’s Guide by Instructables.com” to my authors credits as a contributing author. http://www.amazon.com/Josehf-Lloyd-Murchison/e/B00QAKE94W If you are a contributing author to the Instructables book and you have an author’s page just ask for it to be added. If you do not have an author’s page, go to this sight and create one and ask for How to Fix Absolutely Anything: A Homeowner’s Guide by Instructables.com and Nicole Smith to be added to your author’s profile so you can get the credit as a contributing author. https://authorcentral.amazon.com/ http://www.amazon.com/How-Fix-Absolutely-Anything-Homeowner%C2%92s/dp/1629141860

Topic by Josehf Murchison 4 years ago


Help Needed: How to use Arduino to Power a Motor and 4 PIR Motion Sensors as Switches?

Hello all! I am in need of help. I'm making sculptures that I want to rotate when people walk by. The sculptures will be about 4 1/2 feet tall but light, about half a pound. I want them to spin slowly, around 1-2 rotations per second.  I am hoping to use an Arduino to power a DC motor (or a stepper motor is ideal because it's easier to find one with a flat bottom, but I understand it's also more electronically complicated). I want to use four PRI sensors (one on each side of a square base) as switches to turn on the motor when people walk by. I want to code the Arduino to turn off the motor after about 7 seconds, and the turn it back on if the sensor is triggered again.  I am open to suggestions on every level of this project, including which materials to use, schematics, battery power and code. I've been messing around with it for a while, but I basically feel like I need someone to walk me through it. I've gotten one PRI hooked up to work, but I have no idea how to connect a second, third and fourth, or how to plug it all into an external battery source (a motorcycle battery, a gel cell battery have both been suggested to me, but I'm worried that might be too much power?) Currently I have an Arduino R3 Plus, Osepp and Raspberry PRI sensors, a 12V DC motor, a 12V stepper motor and various other wires and resistors to hook it all up.  Do I need a larger Arduino? What kind of battery power do I use? Any help you can give me would be so Appreciated!!  Thank you very much,  Nicole

Topic by Bennett88 3 years ago  |  last reply 2 years ago