Project: Nicolas Cage necklace!

So one of my favorite things ever is Nicolas Cage. A friend at work told me I should put his picture in a locket and I 1-up'd her. I can't wait to wear it to work and dance around in front of her. :D The necklace is make of the body of an old watch that I completely gutted. The necklace is one of those memory wire chokers you can get really cheap at craft stores. I cut the picture out of the paper case that came with the special edition of Ghost Rider. I'm pretty excited. I wanted to post it, but I didn't know that it would qualify as a slideshow. What do you think? I'll probably just leave it in the forums. :P

Topic by jessyratfink   |  last reply


Tesla Coil Safety?

My high school recently had an engineering fair, and my friend had built a tesla coil. Its has multiple spark gaps, an RF filter (I think thats what its called), a 120 to 20000v transformer, and toroid top-load, if any of that matters. We/I would entertain ourselves by standing away from the coil and holding a fluorescent tube (by the glass with bare hands, not by the contacts) near the top-load and watching it light up. Even though I was well away from the coil, my forearm muscles would twitch, especially it the coil spark hit the contact on the other side of the tube. Then if anybody touched me, both of us would feel a shock and the same slight twitching (the same kind of twitching you feel from those electric muscle stimulators with the pads you put on sore muscles). We even set up a chain of about 5 people holding hands, and all of us would feel a shock, even though only the first person in the line (aka me)  was holding the fluorescent tube near the coil, with my hand on glass, no where within range of the streamers coming from the top-load. Now for my question: is this dangerous? (I know its non-lethal, im talking about my nerves) And what exactly was happening? because it was not an incredibly large coil, and i know that the field of a coil is much larger than the actual streamers. I also read somewhere that insulators dont work the same at incredibly high voltages. I think what I was feeling was the skin effect, and the charge came from the excited electrons in the tube. If my ideas are correct, then wouldn't me holding the tube be just the same as if i had just put my hand near the top-load and let the streamers hit me?

Question by masterbuilder   |  last reply


Join the Egg group

Hi everybody. I created a group about the eggs from this contest and any other egg you want to post. So I hope you join The Egg Group.

Topic by Nicolas Jara   |  last reply


Original idea to ask her dad

Hi there, My name is Nicolas, I'm french and i'm asking for the help of the community. Me and my girlfriend are thinking to get married soon and I wanted to find an original way to ask her dad for his permission. The thing is that her parents live in Washington and I'm not able to go there. I was thinking of sending something or make something virtual (i'm a software engieneer).  Moreover her father is not a real techy guy but rather a tech enthousiast. So I search something around the tech theme. So here is my question, do you have any orignal idea with this tech direction in mind that i can produce to ask her father. Sorry for my bad english. If something is unclear, please ask for mor explanation. Best regards, Nicolas

Topic by NicolasP38   |  last reply


See quantum weirdness for yourself!

An article in ScienceWorld reports on a proposed experimental setup which would make quantum entanglement visible to the naked eye! Using stimulated emission (the same effect that causes lasing), a group led by Nicolas Gisin of the University of Geneva proposes to amplify one photon of an entangled pair to a level that is visible to the naked eye. Observers watching through polarizing filters would then be able to directly see the "spooky action at a distance" of quantum correlations.

Topic by kelseymh   |  last reply


How to fix the switch on a neon sign?

Hi everyone! I have one of those nice Heineken neon sign that i've found in a antique shop. I payed only 10$. The thing is, the guy told me there's a little problem with the switch... I was thinking that I could fix that. When I opened the plastic box and saw the switch I thought to myself '' how am I gonna fix that'' I bought a switch that you install directly on the wire, looks like the one we have on the wall to open the light in a room. (You know the same kind of switch that has a little 'wheel' that you turn to put on or off). I need your help dear Instructable comunity, what should I do, and how? Thanks a million times in advance!! Nick

Topic by Nicolas N GenevièveC   |  last reply


Pimp my flip clock!

Hello dear Instructables community, I need your help:I have 2 flip clock, The 1st one is a regular flip clock, just for time that works with 2 AA batteries, there's 2 lever or switch at the back that allow me to adjust the time. The 2nd clock works with 1 AA battery.... the battery is only for the analog clock, it doesn't change the date or day of the week, I have to do it manually (there's a button for each).I would like to link them together: when the time turns midnight, I want the other clock to change date and day of the week. Both clock would be in the same frame (I know how to do that). I'm sure I can do it, but I need to know what pieces I need to use so they can work together, I need your help dear community!Thanks a lot in advance,Nick

Question by Nicolas N GenevièveC 


Faberge Egg Contest Round-up on Forbes

Check out the Faberge Egg Contest round-up by Forbes.A Fab(erge) Contest Egg-Citing VotesEven the Czar would have been pleased.Forbes.com and Instructables received a bounty of 89 fabulous designs in our recent contest to build a Faberge-styled egg. The possibilities were awe-inspiring. The winner was breathtaking.First a note on our contest: Open to all comers, we asked only that you channel the master craftsman Peter Carl Faberge for your inspiration. The original collection of 89 entries was stunning.In Pictures: Egg-Citing WinnersThe choices were tough, but after picking 20 finalists, a panel of judges from Forbes and Instructables made their selections: four egg-straordinary finalists and a champion in our contest to design a Faberge-style egg. The four runners-up and the winner of the Forbes-Instructables contest will be on display in the Forbes Gallery located on 60 Fifth Ave., New York, from Nov. 12 to 29. The gallery is open, free of charge, to the public. Here's a look at the top five entrants.When The Egg Comes Before The ChickenOur recent contest, sponsored by Forbes.com and Instructables, to make your own Faberge-inspired egg drew 89 fabulous entries. Many of the contestants also shared details of their projects. In the spirit of sharing, we present this marvelous tutorial by one of the contest finalists, egg-strordinaire egg designer, 23-year old Nicolas Jara, based in Santiago, Chile. This was the first time he designed a Faberge-like egg.Here is a fast-forward through how he put the whole world inside a chicken egg. If you're interested in a more detailed description, look for his presentation here. More news and press about Instructables here.

Topic by ewilhelm   |  last reply


Controlling the speed of a Delta fan via PWM? Answered

First off, i would like to state i am a beginner in this area of whatever this area may be considered to you (Not a complete beginner, i know one or two things...). With that being said, i may need things explained to me to a certain level of extent.  The way i learn is hands on, and having a goal. Since i want to learn the basics of Pulse Width Modulation, i started looking around for a project, and had found one after my brother, a person who works in the International part of Technology (IT Guy.) gave me a project to work on, The project being, to control a 12 volt,  4 amp, 48 watt delta fan and the speed it spins at. His reason being, "I have two delta fans that do a wonderful job at cooling my ridiculously overkill of a computer. My problem, is that the amount of noise they make is too loud, and i would like to be able to adjust the speed of them in order to reduce noise." Since his motherboard cannot control the speed of the fans, he is looking of a manual way of doing it, sticking some sort of device in between the ATX power supply, and the input for the fan(s). The fans have three cables: Red(Positive) Black(Negative) and Blue(With minimal research, i believe this is a censor for the CPU to know at what speed the fan is running at. I also heard it is used for speed control? Someone please clarify.) Looking into methods of reducing speed, adjusting the Pulse width looked like the best idea. Now, for my question. How would i make a device capable of controlling the PWM of such device listed above? I would like to adjust speed via a potentiometer. Thank you for your time and support, -RocketPenguin/Nicola Tesla/LinuxJunkie

Question by RocketPenguin   |  last reply


Device Worn on Tongue Allows the Blind to See

For the past 10 years researchers at the University of Wisconsin have been working on making a device that delivers censorial input to the tongue via a matrix of electrodes worn inside the mouth. Using a camera, a computer, and the input device, individuals who have been blind their whole lives are now able to use this relatively simple and non-invasive device to see basic images. Applications for this technology range far and wide, not to mention all the awesome ideas for Instructables that come to mind. More info from the research page...What we have developed is a generic and flexible way to communicate information to people using an array or matrix of small electric stimulators on the surface of the tongue. In much the same way that people can use their fingertips to read Braille letters, which are patterns of raised dots embossed onto a sheet of paper, people can recognize simple spatial patterns using comfortable electrical stimulation of the tongue. For example, we published a preliminary study about two years ago showing that volunteer experimental test subjects could identify very simple geometric patterns such as circles, squares, and triangles. They identified these figures as accurately on the tongue as on the fingertips. And that's when we became excited about the possibilities for a tongue-based electrotactile display, electrotactile being the technical term for electrical stimulation of the sense of touch.The electrical stimulus on the tongue feels like a tingle or vibration; some users have said it feels like soda bubbles. The sensation is well-controlled and not painful unless the user deliberately turns up the level too high. Occasionally it will produce weak metallic taste sensations, a minor side effect. We have never observed any kind of tissue irritation with the gold-plated electrodes.1. One of the applications which has been commercialized is providing vestibular or balance information for people with balance disorders. This is a simple form of sensory substitution, in which the tongue is used to present information from an artificial balance sensor.2. Another application is providing directional or navigational information for people who operate under central command and control scenarios, such as military and civilian rescue personnel. Providing information via the tongue allows them to fully use their vision and hearing to respond to unforeseen threats or hazards. We have shown in the laboratory that it is possible to navigate a virtual maze (like a simple video game) using only information received on the tongue (i.e., buzz on right side of tongue means turn right, etc.).3. A third, more ambitious application would be providing very crude visual information through the tongue for persons who are completely blind. Our colleague Eliana Sampaio at the Louis Pasteur University in Strasbourg, France has used our tongue stimulator with a small video camera and demonstrated an equivalent visual acuity of about 20-to-830, which is very poor vision, but possibly useful for certain limited activities with enough practice. Wicab, Inc continues to improve this technology with the aim of commercializing it.4. A fourth application would be providing tactile feedback to the human operators of robots used forhttps://www.instructables.com/edit/new?type=forumTopic various tasks. For example, UW professor Nicola Ferrier is developing a robot controlled by the tongue of persons with quadriplegia which could incorporate touch sensors into its gripper, relaying the touch information back to the user's tongue.This summary taken from Synopsis of Tongue Display Technology 1/3/2008. Lots more information on the research page.More info on the general process of electrotactile stimulation here. (I can't believe that I am actually linking to How Stuff Works for this, but hey, there isn't an Instructable written for everything...yet.)

Topic by noahw   |  last reply