121Views11Replies

Author Options:

Frequency divider Answered

Hello, I am currently building a large set of speakers, and have just discovered the annoying "frequency dividers". Is there any good guide on how to make one at home, as everything that is sold online is too expensive for me. As a 13-year-old, earning $20.00 can be tough. (Don't say I'm lazy, I'm not. I literally get $20 every $%@!# time I complete a hard piano piece. So far, I haven't completed one "hard piece". It's... been... 4 MONTHS!)

Comments

The forums are retiring in 2021 and are now closed for new topics and comments.
0
Jack A Lopez
Jack A Lopez

Best Answer 11 months ago

I am not sure about this jargon, "frequency divider."

Maybe this is what the kids are calling a "crossover filter"

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Audio_crossover

these days.

https://duckduckgo.com/?q=passive+crossover+filter...

I do not have any good crossover filter recipes, but I am guessing such recipes are out there.

By the way, there is some ambiguity to that phrase, "frequency divider."

I think the kind of "frequency divider" that Orngrimm was thinking of, was the kind that takes an input waveform, with some frequency f (and period T), and gives an output waveform that has frequency f/N (and period N*T).

I will try to draw you a picture of a square wave, x(t), and another squarewave y(t) that has 1/3 the frequency of x(t). I tried to draw this by typing it, and it probably looks best in a font like Courier, for which every character has the same width.

x(t) __--__--__--__--__--__--__--__--__--

y(t)=x(t/3)______------______------______------

Coincidentally, this is the same kind of frequency divider described in the Wikipedia article for "frequency divider"

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frequency_divider

0
Cheesey125
Cheesey125

Answer 11 months ago

I hate it when I use the wrong search term! BLARGH! thanks!

0
AussieAlf
AussieAlf

11 months ago

Cheesy, i feel your pain. I was forced to play the piano by my mum when i was your age. She did it with my best interests at heart, but sadly, it didn't work for me. Sorry, can't help you with electronic stuff...not really my bag.

0
Cheesey125
Cheesey125

Reply 11 months ago

I'm on 7 years with it... and I have Tics. (Tourettes too)

0
Orngrimm
Orngrimm

11 months ago

Depending on your waveform, this can be super easy or very hard...

Sine / Triangular: Hard!
Rectangular: Super easy. Just take a counter and connect at the stage you want: Bit 2: half frequency, Bit 3 = 1/4 f, Bit 4 = 1/8f and so forth. But remember: Those are binary waveforms. Not smooth like sine.

0
Cheesey125
Cheesey125

Reply 11 months ago

For audio? I think that can be both square sine, etc.

0
Cheesey125
Cheesey125

Reply 11 months ago

Also, what does bit, stage, and counter mean? Sorry, as you can see, the internet has NOT served me well.

0
BabyET
BabyET

11 months ago

Given that you are building speakers, I suspect that what you are actually trying to build is a "crossover" circuit to take the input signal and then split it between your woofers and tweeters with high frequencies going to the small tweeters and lower frequencies going to your larger woofers.
I'm no expert in circuit design, but a quick google search for "build a speaker crossover" throws up a lot of useful-looking videos and web pages. Good Luck (with both the crossover and the piano lessons...)

0
Downunder35m
Downunder35m

11 months ago

I think you mean a "crossover" not a divider ;)
A crossover is basically filter.
For two speakers high- and low- pass, for three you have the mid ranges as well.
In their most basic form all you need is a bit of wire to make the inductive coils and some capacitors.
With budget low I suggest to salvage an old microwave for the wire in the transformer.
The (audio) capacitors you might have to buy though.