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Ideas, half-formed or otherwise. Answered

So i looked at the Luchador Mask, made from re-cycled shoes and caught myself considering the issue of a steel helmet. It'd be tricky for me to pull it off, of course, but i reckon i could.
Same with the lost-wax casting i promised ages ago, and didn't get round to.
I DO plan to do both of them some day, and the skittles gun, too....
But anyway, who else has mooted instructables to publish, only to skip out at the last moment? Who's got what planned?
I appreciate the need of some people to keep things secret, if they've got new and revolutionary projects, by the way, but i'm still asking.

Discussions

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Imnotthere17
Imnotthere17

12 years ago

so, while I was at a Lowe's store, I saw these neat things called a Chimenea* (not sure if that is spelled completely right.) but basically its a really small fireplace that you can put outside. I was wondering if you could ever use that kind of thing as a forge. and ideas?

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Imnotthere17
Imnotthere17

Reply 12 years ago

yeah, a mod on the chimenea shouldnt be that hard to make. another thing; what would be a good book or website that would give me information on blacksmithing/newbie info?

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abbabibble2
abbabibble2

Reply 12 years ago

anvilfire.com they have good info.

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Imnotthere17
Imnotthere17

Reply 12 years ago

much obliged

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Austringer
Austringer

Reply 12 years ago

If you are wanting to set up a cheap forge, google "brake drum forge". An old brake drum, some black iron pipe and you're mostly there. I've seen some pretty impressive work done with a brake drum.

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Vendigroth
Vendigroth

Reply 12 years ago

forums.dfoggknives.com They, too, have good info, and the forum members are freindly, relaxed and helpful.

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Vendigroth
Vendigroth

Reply 12 years ago

Goodhart makes a good point, you would need a blower. Also, a good bed of sand or ash'd be a good idea, to keep the fire off the iron.

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Goodhart
Goodhart

Reply 12 years ago

To use it as a forge, some sort of bellows or blower would have to be incorporated into the bottom....somehow.

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jtobako
jtobako

Reply 12 years ago

I think it was Bealer who had a picture of a forge that used a long chimney to create a draft rather than a blower. A chimenea wouldn't have a long enough chimney but that could be fixed.

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Goodhart
Goodhart

Reply 12 years ago

There would still need to be some sort of regulator then. There are times when one needs to "stoke" the fire with oxygen....if it had an unregulated draft, fuel would be wasted when you didn't need as much heat.

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jtobako
jtobako

Reply 12 years ago

I suspect (not willing to go into the other room and check : )) that a woodstove-style sliding vent would be fine. More likely, the fire was just set fairly low and used mostly with small stock. Then again, I tend to run hot but small fires, working the metal hard and taking a rest while it's heating ; )

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Goodhart
Goodhart

Reply 12 years ago

I wonder if it would be suitable for burning coke ?

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jtobako
jtobako

Reply 12 years ago

Anything that keeps a draft will burn coke. Not sure how fine the coke should be though (walnut? peanut?).

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Goodhart
Goodhart

Reply 12 years ago

wow, I have been away from that subject much too long (almost 30 years since I last worked a piece of iron *sigh*)

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Vendigroth
Vendigroth

Reply 12 years ago

Yup, got one of them. Cast iron, with nice rusty streaks, it really looks the part. As for cracking at heat: the iron grates which sit at the bottom are long gone, i'll have to replace them. Other than that, it's fine. I've had the seams glowing red, and no visible cracks.

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jtobako
jtobako

Reply 12 years ago

Is it one piece on the bottom or two bolted together? I have a cast iron plate for the bottom of my forge and after a couple of hours of forging one day it gave in to the uneven heat and cracked from the center air holes out to the rim. Scared me a bit when it popped.

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Vendigroth
Vendigroth

Reply 12 years ago

2 pieces, bolted together, with the chinmey bolted to the top of the second piece. Also, there's a good bed of sand and ash in the bottom, which keeps the heat off the metal.

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jtobako
jtobako

Reply 12 years ago

So it's built like a hamburger bun (horizontal layers) instead of a clam (vertical split)? Just curious on how it handles heat stress.

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Vendigroth
Vendigroth

Reply 12 years ago

Yup, it's in 3 main parts: The bottom part, with the legs, which contains the sand bed and the fire, the middle part, and the chimney.

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Goodhart
Goodhart

Reply 12 years ago

Yeah, I think he was referring to the ones constructed like those in the pic of my second link

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topmonkey
topmonkey

Reply 12 years ago

I'd worry the thing might crack at such high temps.

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Imnotthere17
Imnotthere17

Reply 12 years ago

that could be true. although, with a metal chim., it wouldnt be a problem.

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Goodhart
Goodhart

Reply 12 years ago

Yeah, that was one of my concerns too, especially if burning walnut sized coke. That stuff gets hotter then the original coal would.

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Raevun68
Raevun68

12 years ago

Being disabled and home allot I have way to much time on my hands. lol I built that tool box forge, but I have not had the chance to test it as of yet. It is not quite completed. I simply got a tool box with dimensions that are quite close to the dimensions of some fire place liners and simply placed them inside and cut a hole in one end for the exit and shaped the brick on the top end opposite the opening and fitted it with a weed burner for the heat source. As stated this has not been tested and it still have a bit of work to do, such as putting a base on it. It is pretty heavy but it should be interesting to try out. lol I will post info when I get the chance to test it, but with the winter weather setting in testing it will have to wait as I live in an apartment and can not test it here. lol I don't have a digital camera but I will see if I can come up with a rough drawing to post here so you can get an idea what I did.

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Spl1nt3rC3ll
Spl1nt3rC3ll

12 years ago

It's not hornet season so my hornet death trap is out 'till summer.

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topmonkey
topmonkey

12 years ago

are you talking about one of those clay egged shaped things with a chimney?

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Goodhart
Goodhart

12 years ago

Eventually I want to mod / improve / create instructable for the ELF/EMI detector I built eons ago.

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Ferrite
Ferrite

12 years ago

I have been thinking about posting a RR spike tomahawk for some time, but haven't gotten around to it yet.

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Imnotthere17
Imnotthere17

12 years ago

Hey, this is more of a question pertaining to my Instructable that I am working on. I was wondering if you could ever use a concrete step as a substitute for an anvil. It is straight edged and very flat. Here is the Instructable that I am still working on. The information in this is more of a prediction of how I think that it will go. I have not actually started this project.

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Vendigroth
Vendigroth

Reply 12 years ago

Ah, tricky one. In short, the reply is: Yes but not very well or for long. Concrete's not as hard as steel, so it'll crumble, and not bounce the hammer back up. Also, if there's any grit or stones on the concrete's surface, the pattern'll get printed into the steel. so: Yes, but don't expect it to be as good. You can make a fair anvil by setting a sledgehammer head into a bucket of concrete. that answer your question?

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sam
sam

12 years ago

I have quite a few things that I haven't had time to finish or document.. How to build a foundry, Ikea Lack Hack: Interactive Glowing Coffee Table, Bike part chandelier, something involving an unused cellphone.. , How to make doughnuts in the woods, How to build a small combat robot, Go kart, small engine repair... the list goes on..