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Q: flower-pot mounted in plastic bottle partially filled with water Answered

hi, i have major water-issues here in the garden (steep southern slope in the mountains; little earth:; hot in the summer). so i always play around and look for solutions. latest play: i cut off a bottle, filled it with an inch of water, and then, a couple inches above inserted a flower-pot that tightly fits. q: is there a chance that the roots will eventually feed of the ´tank´ at the bottom of the bottle so that no waterinbg of the flower(pot) is needed (sort of a self-contained system)?

bowing (flower, too)

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la xerra

16 days ago

downunder: ... root rot is not nice, even less nice is it if this happens so quickly that you fail to fix it.(..) Give the plants a change to develop the right root system first and all should be just fine

xerra: stupid questions: do roots have to be physically in touch with water to absorb some? hanging roots over water, in a very humid environment, cant feed?

ps, will just do the test: fill the ´tank´ below half-way, and stop watering the plant... and see if it pulls through (hoping i am not a plant and some smart s hit a hole god runs similar experiments on me)

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la xerra

16 days ago

petercd: The main trick is to keep sunlight out of the water to prevent mold/fungus.

xerra: you mean the plastic-bottle i used being transparent? if thats an issue i just wrap some dark trash around (that said, of course there is never trash, ´just´ the lack of skills and creativity to re-use it). gracias

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Downunder35m

19 days ago

I experimented with a similar approach as an external filter and nutrient removal system for my fish tank.
The first attempt really failed badly as my little tank top garden started to rot quickly.
As Peter said, root rot is not nice, even less nice is it if this happens so quickly that you fail to fix it.
After a lof of errors I finally realised that it is actually best to fully abandone the idea of soil.
Fully hydroponic worke fine for the entire season here.
After this I started again with soil.
And again it all failed quickly.
Turns out the key is to keep the moisture levels right once soil is involved.
The plants will grow as normal until they reach the bottom where all the water is.
Once in there the roots slowly change, they adapt to the water only enviroment.
And if then the water mainly circulates in the bottom part of the pot all stays fine.

If you grow plants in a fish tank you can see similar happen.
Plants on a piece of wood for example will develop "air roots" - just thin strings with no hairs or anything.
With this water intake is eleminated as much as nutrient intake.
Give the plants a change to develop the right root system first and all should be just fine ;)

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la xerrapetercd

Reply 21 days ago

wasnt familiar with the earthbox. thanks. looks interesting but a bit swanky (did you ever build your own? seems like the materials it uses can be found abundantly in the garbage).
btw: in the down&dirty setup i rigged there is ample of air/space between the bottom of the flowerpot and the level of water in the plastic-bottle. i figure/hope the roots will ´drop down´ and seek the humidity. but i have no friggn idea if that works... another toy... another killing-time-machine... thanks again

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petercdla xerra

Reply 21 days ago

Yes, thats my diy version in the pic I posted.
I cut out the lid and drilled a lot of holes to form the grid which I placed inside the box on 10 short sections of 50mm pvc tube.
The main trick is to keep sunlight out of the water to prevent mold/fungus.