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Quirky tip on how to propagate roses? Answered

Recently I found this little quirky tip on how to propagate roses/ bushes and I was wondering if it was true?


In the little tidbit, they tell you to use a cutting of a rose of course and then put a little cinnamon on one of the ends that you intend to grow roots. Then poke that end in to a potato. Then bury that part with the potato into the ground. After I guess eventually you get a new rose bush.

I was wondering can this actually work? Or is this just bait to get you to read more of their articles?

Discussions

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magiczabata

7 weeks ago

The above works especially well on our highly cultivated roses.
A normal cutting quite often results in a weak plants that might not even show the properties of the original.
The long and straight stems we like for a vase for example are in most ases no longer present.
Reason for that is quite simple too:
A cultivated rose started as a hybrid to get the smell, size, color and so on.
So all focus is on "good and favoured" properties.
And
if check a cultivate rose from your local garden center carefully when
planting it you can see where the donor ended and the cultivated rose
started ;)
For a lot of nice looking roses though it does not really matter much as some are actually hard and tolerant enough.


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Downunder35m

9 months ago

There are many ways to get a new rose out of an existing one.
Cuttings are a very old method and some rose lovers have dedicated ways for different types of roses.
The cinamon trick is actually quite old and not only used for roses.
It basically provides a sterile enviroment so the stem won't start to rot.
With enough moisture, light and living parts left on the stem it will try to grow roots with the last energy left in it.

Another way I like personally is to use a cheap bush or even wild rose as the base.
When the roses start to get ready in spring you see all these tiny pimples on the stems - thi is where the new life will start.
With a Y cut you can open the skin/bark and carefully remove this tiny shoot.
On the wild rose you do the same but discard the shoot so you can place the one taken from your favourite rose in there.
Wrap it carefully, after closing the skin and wound with propagation tape or similar.
Don't use sticky tape or such things as you need to shoot to be able to grow out of the cover ;)
Once spring is in full swing you should see that the transplant starts to grow.
Time to cut down most of the unwanted wild parts of the base rose bush.
A little later and you will see the new shoot really takes off and it is time to remove all other parts of the donor rose and to only keep that part with your new rose growing on it.
Like a parasite the new rose will take over the root system and starv what is left of the bush - a new rose is born.

The above works especially well on our highly cultivated roses.
A normal cutting quite often results in a weak plants that might not even show the properties of the original.
The long and straight stems we like for a vase for example are in most ases no longer present.
Reason for that is quite simple too:
A cultivated rose started as a hybrid to get the smell, size, color and so on.
So all focus is on "good and favoured" properties.
And if check a cultivate rose from your local garden center carefully when planting it you can see where the donor ended and the cultivated rose started ;)
For a lot of nice looking roses though it does not really matter much as some are actually hard and tolerant enough.
But if your normal cutting does not grow as expected or has only tiny flowers then cosider the above method for the next season - or do both so you can compare results in ral time.

Another trick is something I use for a different plant, so look out for my new posting about blackberries ;)

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nateboussad

9 months ago

I repotted before seeing responses. I got rid of the old moisture holding soil and went to a plain soil. The plants that were looking good are not so good and turning black and the ones that had no leaves but were still green are coming around. I am definitely going to follow the ideas listed here for next year. I want to have some knock out roses and an old climbing yellow rose in specific areas of my expanded garden so will need to go to the resources tab to find suppliers that grow for my area in middle Kansas. Not ready yet, we were 74 degrees on Sunday and 7 degrees today...




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Treasure Tabby

9 months ago

So it basically was a bit of bait there. Go fig.
Thanks for the reply. :)

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Royell

10 months ago

You just use the rose clipping. Shove one end into the ground, water well, and they'll take root.
I use to know a guy who sold bundles of rose stems bound by twine and dipped in wax (the wax preserved them for quite a while); you trimmed one end to remove the wax, stuck stuck that end of the bundle into the ground, and a little while later you had a small rose bush.