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help i need information on capacitors Answered

This is a call for help I need all the basic information on using capacitors. Especially how to charge them, and discharge them. I need to know so I can post my first Instructable.

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killerjackalope

10 years ago

Ugh I have to agree, there... There's a user I forgotten the name of now that churned out four or five in one day, all lined up in recent looking very, very bad.

The ideas ranged from pretty cool to downright rubbbish, what annoys me is that the majority of them are incredibly poor on instruction too, if someone did diagrams but knew what they were at I'd be a little appeased but steps consist of things like: build and add circuit with no explanation of what that might be or how it may be constructed.

I know I don't always publish construction 'ibles and some of them might be a bit waffley to people but paint diagrams and google images I won't stoop...

oops, tell a lie, I've nicked the odd image in some of mine, though they were talkey 'ibles not buildy 'ibles...

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lemonie

10 years ago

You're unwise to embark upon a project which is based around something you don't understand. You might be better telling us roughly what you want to do?
Capacitors store charge, but unlike batteries can charge & discharge much more rapidly. However, unless they're very big or expensive they only hold a fraction of the amount of energy that a battery can store.
gmoon's vague answer is correct, but your question is also vague.

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randofolemonie

Reply 10 years ago

You will never understand something unless you try to do it. If I only did the things I understood beforehand, I wouldn't accomplish much.

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lemonierandofo

Reply 10 years ago

Too true, as Punkguyta said. I'm in favour of people trying rather than asking for answers. But we don't know what the guy has got - possible potential for harm.

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lemonie

10 years ago

There always has been a "bottom-end", but what I miss are the amusingly moronic "arse-end" postings.
You'll probably notice that I tend to have a go at the things you mention, so I can hardy disagree with you!

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gmoon

10 years ago

Charging:
Simply connect a voltage source to the capacitor(s), of course observing correct polarity. Once charged, remove the voltage.

The capacitance value (100uF, for instance) is the max charge a particular cap can store. Leaving it connected to the voltage source after the cap is charged will not harm the cap.

The voltage rating (25V, for instance) on the cap is the max voltage the capacitor can handle. A higher voltage most likely will damage or destroy the cap.

Discharging:
Create a current path between the cap leads, through which the capacitor(s) can dissipate the stored charge. A short circuit connection, for instance (connect the leads together.)