My big telescope project

I'm starting to design a very large telescope for my "backyard", ideally it will be a 1 meter (or larger) Prime Focus Telescope. I am in the process of engineering the primary mirror and have concluded that I need to create an array of small hexagon mirrors similar to the Keck Observatory but smaller. This will decrease the quality of the telescope but it will make the project affordable. The biggest problem with this design is that the mirrors have to be exactly placed and tilted to form the a perfect parabolic curve, and frankly I have no idea how to practically do that. If anyone has an idea about how this can be done or questions about my project i would be glad to hear from you.

Posted by Twlight 9 years ago


perseids

Its the annual Perseid meteor shower tonight and tomorrow, if you're lucky.

Posted by steveastrouk 6 years ago


Interesting paper (preprint) on science fiction in astronomy

There's a preprint out today which uses archival infrared astrometric data from IRAS to set limits on the existence of actual Dyson spheres within 300 pc of the Solar System, a volume which includes roughly 106 solar-type stars.

Posted by kelseymh 10 years ago


RIP Sir Patrick Moore

The greatest British populariser of astronomy and space science, Sir Patrick Moore died today at 89. I would suggest that nearly 100% of British astronomers were influenced by Moore and his TV programme, The Sky at Night - of which, Sir Patrick was the longest serving presenter of any TV series anywhere. It is hard to imagine any more iconic figure in science media than Patrick Moore. A great loss.

Posted by steveastrouk 5 years ago


RIP Sir Bernard Lovell

One of England's most important radio astronomers, really the founder of the field in the UK, and an important member of the radar design team of WWII died today - he would have been 99 at the end of the month http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-19164237

Posted by steveastrouk 6 years ago


NASA snowflake and garland contest - ends December 22nd

Just wanted to share a contest that a NASA blog is doing for papercraft - they're looking for space-themed paper snowflakes and garlands, and the winners will get a prize pack of NASA goodies. The full details and rules are here: http://astrophysics.gsfc.nasa.gov/outreach/podcast/wordpress/index.php/2010/12/01/contest-let-it-snow-paper-snowflakes/ The contest ends on December 22nd at 11:59PM EST, so there are a few days left to enter!

Posted by saramwrap 7 years ago


Transit of Venus

This evening was the last chance to see a transit of Venus in our lifetimes.  The next one won't be for another 100 years. It was 100 degrees (~37 celcius) and we had storm clouds, but the clouds parted and I saw it!!!!  The hastily thrown together viewers worked and we knew it was Venus instead of dirt on the lens because the little black dot moved.  I took pictures of my set-up, but the macro feature on the camera was malfunctioning so no pictures of venus crossing the sun disc. Anyone else get to see it? 

Posted by CatTrampoline 6 years ago


Photograph of extra-solar planetary system!

An article in Science News today shows an infrared image of HR 8799 with three roughly Jupiter-sized planets around it! The speckling in the center (around the "+") is the star.The same article shows two Hubble images of Fomalhaut taken 18 months apart. The two images show directly the orbital motion of a previously detected planet, Fomalhaut b.Update (10:12 pm PST 13 Nov 2008): I've attached the two pictures from the SN article. The first is the IR composite of the three-planet system HR 8799; the second is Fomalhaut, showting the offset of Fomalhaut b between 2004 and 2006. I encourage you to read the actual article to get the details of how the data was obtained, and to judge for yourselves its veracity.Update (12:05 pm PST 14 Nov 2008): The two articles are out in today's ''Science'' along with a news article and editorial (requires subscription).HR 8799: Morois, et al.Fomalhaut: Kalas, et al.

Posted by kelseymh 10 years ago


Any suggestions for a 5mm - 10mm telescope eyepiece?

I am currently using a home built 3'' refracting telescope, and want to build a shorter focal length eyepiece to get some detail for observing planets (lunar surface, rings on Saturn, more of the moons of Jupiter. The current setup uses a plossl eyepiece with about a 25mm focal length, giving 30 to 40x magnification, and allowing very clear viewing of the moon, and will pick out three of Jupiters moons on a clear night. Ideally I'd like a 5mm to 10mm focal length, for a 100 to 200x magnification. I've considered using the lens out of a DVD drive, which looks as though it could work, although I've only seen one example of it done before. I also have a selection of reasonable quality prisms and lenses about 1'' diameter, with focal lengths from about 2'' to 4''. So, how well would a DVD drive lens work, and are there any interesting designs that make an eyepiece with a focal length significantly shorter than any of its component lenses (in the same way the focal length of a plossl is about 1/2 the focal length of the lenses used). Thanks in advance for any help. (Would this get better response in the photography section)

Posted by The Skinnerz 7 years ago


Giant Hi-res image of the night sky

Found this the other day. Huge ultra-high-resolution image of the night sky, with interactive doohickeys to boot. Very enjoyable.  http://media.skysurvey.org/interactive360/index.html

Posted by ilpug 6 years ago


Automate Astronomy Dome - Help

I am interested in building an electronic system to control the orientation of an astronomy dome based on the orientation of the telescope. I need suggestions on the various components I might use. Motivation: This is a Meade 16" LX200 telescope in an Ash Dome. Owned by a friend who doesn't use it much. I get to use it, maintain it, enhance it for about 1 week a year. I can control the scope with my laptop using a program like "The Sky". However, after the telescope is pointed, I have to manually manage the dome and rotate it with a bi-directional switch. Very tedious. The motor is 1/4 HP, 1725RPM, drawing 5.6 Amps at 120VAC. There are programs that can be used with the telescope control to manage the rotation of the dome, but I am thinking of a lower-tech solution. I would like to put some reflecting tape (perhaps mirrors) on the sides of the dome slot and point some lights (perhaps LED lasers) with a pickup device (hence the idea of the garage door styled "electronic eye"). The general idea would be to set up some simple device that would detect the change in location of the direction that the telescope is pointing, and activate the dome to track with the telescope. If the telescope turns, the light would no longer be reflected and the dome would try to "find" itself or re-orient to a point where the light is once again detected by the reflection from the mirrors on the dome. I was thinking about: Garage door electronic eye activators 120V 6A relay switches 2 enhancements: detect direction of the telescope; bar codes in the reflective tape wireless signals to send activation to relay switches (telescopes go in circles and eliminating wires is always good.) Anyone have any ideas about pre-built components, sources of good relays, electronic eyes, etc? TIA, Chris.

Posted by chrisjx 10 years ago


Help: I would like to build a switch activated by light from a star.

My good friends are getting married. they met 16 years ago. i would like to build a trigger that is activated by the light of a star 16 light years away. the trigger would turn on the lights set up for the party. I have a telescope and have found a good candidate star. what do i need to build it? is there a light sensor i can hook up to the telescope? how do i hook that up to a switch? Please any help would be greatly appreciated. thanks

Posted by ishmael101 11 years ago


Buy a Galileoscope! *Update* It's HERE!

I wish I'd posted this a while ago, but I think I was remembering a post in some other forum as being on here. I'm not selling these or making money, I just think it's cool.2009 is the International Astronomical Union's International Year of Astronomy, in recognition of both Galileo's first recorded astronomical observations and Kepler's publishing Astronomia Nova. As a part of this whole thing, the Galileoscope was created.Although most astronomers/telescope enthusiasts discourage buying telescopes of this size, because they are usually crap, and just discourage you with lousy views, this one was designed by professional astronomers. While it is largely plastic to keep costs down, the lenses are high-quality glass achromatic doublet lenses, which are usually found in much more expensive 'scopes. The other cool part about this project is that you can anonymously donate a telescope, and it will be sent to someone who can use it, whether it's a homeschooling family in Iowa or a schoolhouse in southeast Asia.Oh, and the best part: the telescope is $15. You really can't beat that price, and shipping is only $8.95 in the US. If you donate one, it's $12.50 with no shipping charges. I bought one, even though I have a larger telescope, as a more portable one for quick peeks at planets and to take on trips.Buy one! Or two! And donate some! They're cheap!Update 30 Aug 09: due to increased manufacturing costs since they started production, the price has been raised to $20 plus shipping to buy one, and $15 with no shipping to donate one. Still a heck of a deal, though.Second Update 2 September 09: ZOMG IT'S HERE! I should have just ordered the thing when I first heard about it. I was order #22,670, and the first 20,000 were shipped in mid-June. I have it, though, and I'll be posting an Instructable with assembly instructions as soon as I get around to it, and pictures taken through it once this stupid overcast blows over.

Posted by CameronSS 9 years ago


What does the universe look like?

I watch these magnificent programs about the universe, so wonderfully explained by Morgan Freeman.  I am puzzled with one question.  How can the science predict the size of our galaxy in somewhat vivid details?  So, here is my analogy.  With the space technology at hand, taking a picture of our own galaxy is the same as taking a picture of the Empire State building from one of its balconies.  Can someone please elaborate on this subject. Thank you.

Posted by kabira 6 years ago


Makeshift Telescope

I apologize if I misplaced my topic; I'm sure it's nothing unusual though.Okay.. so at night when I go to walk my dogs, I have a huge open sky and not too much light pollution (Go figure -- Orlando, FL). The moon is always super bright, and about once a month, way larger than usual. Among that and the usual contellations, I see brighter objects, flashing ones, so I know they're planets. I see three of them nowadays.Thing is.. since I know they're planets, I want to see them bigger now! I want to see with my own eyes these planets, at least a liiiiitle bit bigger, but I can't afford a telescope. Even if I could, I'm just like the "why buy when I could make it myself"ers on here.I have some lenses; Some from an old (good for it's day) film camera, some from.. other things. Now I know they are problem very limited in their ability to do the requested job.. but like I said, anything is better than a blinking dot; I'll be happy with any beneficial results.I know someone is going to ask something about the lenses, and I'll tell you right now: I don't know. I have no idea how to "measure" lenses or their power.. so any guidance in this area would also be appreciated.Thanks guys!

Posted by NarNar 9 years ago


Venus Won't Pass Between Us and The Sun For Over Another 105 Years

Venus Passing between us and the Sun visible across N. America tomorrow at sunset for Reno. http://news.cnet.com/8301-11386_3-57447155-76/venus-transit-app-lets-users-track-the-planets-rare-voyage/ None of us will live to see the next transit :-( A

Posted by iceng 6 years ago


Seeing Stars (spatially resolved images of Betegeuse)

As reported in Science Daily, two recent papers report on spatially resolved images of the star Betegeuse (alpha Orionis) and its surrounding gas envelope. A nicely color-scaled image is also NASA's Astronomy Picture Of The Day (attached).Thanks to The Science Forums for the pointers!

Posted by kelseymh 9 years ago


Idea - Help Me Create It!

I want to create, frame, and wall mount a simple screen which automatically refreshes via wifi every day with a new image taken offline. I envision a small screen on my wall that will automatically update with the new astronomy picture of the day (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/astropix.html) or the wikipedia featured picture or whatever I want.  It will showcase better artwork than anything I can buy and the image will never get old because it will always be changing.  I have no idea how to go about creating this and really hope someone can help.  

Posted by tbor 6 years ago


Meteor Shower in late April

Upcoming shower:Day: April 21 - 22Constilation/type: LyridsFrequency: 16 - 30 per hourIllumination: 5.4%For the meteor shower calender, check out these site I found:http://www.cultcase.com/2009/01/7-major-meteor-showers-you-can-expect.htmlhttp://theskyscrapers.org/meteors/index.php/year/2009http://www.seasky.org/astronomy/astronomy_calendar_2009.htmlhttp://stardate.org/nightsky/meteors/http://www.skyandtelescope.com/observing/highlights/36787804.htmlNotice: These are not my sitesNotice this also: Some info ranges, but the dates stay april 21 - 22 (Or just 22)

Posted by Flumpkins 9 years ago


Happy Birthday, Mr Laser, Happy Birthday ... to ... you

OK, so it's hard to do an impression of Marylin Monroe in a topic title.Today, is, according to google, the anniversary of the invention of the laser. First demonstrated in 1960, it was known as a solution looking for a problem - everybody agreed it was clever, but it took some time before it saw a practical use. Now, every single "western" home has at least a handful of lasers, ad they have seen duty everywhere from art to war, via medicine and astronomy.Time to have a quick review of how this tricksie piece of hardware (especially the LED variety) has been treated by our members: Laser-based projects.Laser vortex from this InstructableGoogle's laser results

Posted by Kiteman 10 years ago


?Sky watchers calendar"

Hello everyone... A whhile back I stumbled upon a website that would allow you to enter in your location information and do a search based on "celestial events" "IST fly-over times" satellite locations, meteor shower events, eclipses etc... I recently bought a DSLR camera and a telescope with camera mount. My Son is very much into astronomy and I would love to encourage this for him... The telescope is nothing special, it is my, as well as his first telescope. I would like to capture photos of this up and coming eclipse in April, as well as some star systems and meteor shower events with some long exposure. :) anyway... Does anyone here know where I can find this type of calendar.. I have spent much of the morning Googling, but I am coming up short in finding this... Thanks in advance Matthew

Posted by SlickSqueegie 5 years ago


I have a question about how to organize what I have been doing for the past 8 months. . .

Many of you know I am, part time, mentoring and teaching science to a young lady with Asperger's syndrome.  Partly because I have so much fun with them, and partly from just forgetting, I tend to not use my camera nor camcorder much if at all.  Aside from that, I am NOT sure how to present/organize it all.   Each "session" contains between 5 and 30  different "experiments" some as simple as comparing a rubber ball rolling down an incline to a paper tube doing the same thing up to the making and use of lab equipment. The subject matter is diverse, from physics to chemistry to astronomy. I would appreciate any adive.   Thank you.

Posted by Goodhart 6 years ago


Updated: I Need Math Help: How do I find the info needed and what formula do I use to figure this fluid physics and astronomy question with?

  Finally, I have been given the source of the "info" the fellow talking to me, was drawing from:  It can be found here:   Hydroplate 'theory' Ok, here is my problem.   I have been presented with, what at first sounds like a totally ludicrous concept, but in order to prove or disprove it, I need to have some math backing that I don't have in my head (nor in my experience). I need the approximate mass of the asteroids in the belt.   And also I need the distance to the belt.   I will also need to figure how much pressure it would take to force a  column of water skyward at escape velocity, equal to that mass.  And if there is a way to give a simple explanation for the math, that would be apreciated also :-) ?

Posted by Goodhart 9 years ago


Watch engineers build a Mars rover!

This is super-cool. NASA's JPL has set up live streaming video from inside the clean room where they're building the Curiosity rover, formerly known as the Mars Science Laboratory. Work is from 8am-11pm PDT Monday through Friday. I found this on Saturday morning and I've been waiting all weekend for those slacker engineers to get to work so this would be worth posting. Some comparison: The old Sojourner rover from 1997 was the size of a largeish R/C car. The Mars Exploration Rovers from 2004 that are still running (!) are the size of golf carts. This thing's the size of a Mini Cooper, and has a proportionally larger load of sciencey stuff packed on. Instructables doesn't allow you to embed Ustream into Forum topics, so you'll have to go to Ustream to watch: http://www.ustream.tv/nasajpl Via Bad Astronomy Blog, image from MSL website

Posted by CameronSS 8 years ago


Honolulu Mini Makers Faire

The second annual Honolulu Mini Makers Faire is coming up, Saturday May 9th! Last year's organizers are back and the event is growing!     Saturday, May 9, 2015 from 12:00 PM to 5:00 PM (HST)     The Sullivan Center for Innovation and Leadership at ‘Iolani School (563 Kamoku St, Honolulu, HI) is the place again this year (thx!)     Attendance at the Honolulu Mini Maker Faire is free. Please sign up through Eventbrite.     "May 9th, have you reserved the date?!  We are less than 2 weeks away and the list of things to see include: 3D printing, Virtual Reality, blacksmithing, Lego, robotics, Minecraft, costuming, modeling, Raspberry Pi, drones – including a drone competition, musical instruments, astronomy, and way more!     "This is our second year holding a Mini Maker Faire in Honolulu.  We've added a 2nd soldering workshop, a raspberry pi workshop, and two drone racing events.  For more information go to http://makerfairehonolulu.com/. Register now for limited slots at the Hawaii Drone Club's Racer-X Competitions at the 2015 Honolulu Mini Maker Faire: http://t.co/6WXAwBiu4G" The event media page has vids from last year's event- a sample of what's to come this year. One of Hawaii's greatest maker events of 2015, come share what you are working on!

Posted by CrLz 3 years ago


Science Section

Is it just me, or is the science section as a whole getting suckier?Science is my best subject. I get A's in school, avidly read Scientific American and other science magazines, read physics and astronomy books, and once gave a 45 minute speech about the viability of Algae as bio fuel (Instructable coming soon) for a science project. So obviously, when I first joined, I ate up the science section, reading through great instructables, like the ones created by egbertfitzwilly (oh, shut up, you know who I mean) and other great instructablers. I loved them. Now however, it seems to be full of toy guns, electronics projects that belong in tech and recipes. Goda**it, just because your beer recipe uses yeast doesn't make it a freaking science fair project! If your instructable doesn't need a second category, DON'T GIVE IT A SECOND CATEGORY. Whoa, that was hard, eh? For instance, this. Its not a bad Instructable, sure, what what the heck is it doing in the science section? How about the ginger beer instructable? Or smart LED's? Or a coding machine? I want, and I'm sure others want, more Egbert and Nurdrage styled instructables, with cool stuff that makes us go "Whoa" and want to do it ourselves, not some of the random junk that people seem to throw in to get an extra 3 hits.

Posted by Rotten194 9 years ago


Astronomer's Assistant

My next submission for the Create Scholarship is an outdoor one. And a night. I'm an astronomy student by education and I have had the opportunity to teach both students and the general public. One of the most frustrating aspects of showing folks where particular objects or constellations are located. Just pointing at it doesn't cut it. Unless you get real intimate in their personal space, they have no idea what you are pointing at. Informing them that, "Betelgeuse is the reddish-orange star right there" quickly results in, "they have colors?" I've used a green laser at star parties in the past with much satisfaction however, a shivering hand or a need for both hands for demonstration quickly makes it a hinderance. I would like to build a robot that continuously points at a selected object in the sky and follows it through the sky. The software would convert right ascension and declination and factor in date and time to provide the robot with the proper azimuth (compass direction) and altitude (angle above horizon) to aim with. The Roomba is great at rotating, so I would refine it and add a stepper motor with encoders for the laser arm. It would also have a tilt sensor to compensate for uneven ground. A red-lcd (for happy dilated pupils) display of all the pertinent information as well as object name would also be displayed. The hardware requirements are minimal as the database for popular objects would fit on most any memory stick. A remote control (wireless PDA or the like) for easy navigation and manual override would be also be included. I think most any amateur astronomer or educator would find such a robotic assistant indispensable. I for one can't wait to build it!

Posted by SolamenteDoug 11 years ago


Yuri's Night SF: Call for Projects

It's time to start planning for the second-annual Bay Area Yuri's night! Have something fun to show off? Of course you do. Enter your proposal for an Art or Science project. Just download the Call for Submissions .pdf and get started.If you don't live in the SF Bay Area, check yurisnight.net for a space party near you.What's Yuri's Night? On April 12, 2008, building on last year's incredible success and in conjunction with NASA's 50th anniversary, Yuri's Night Bay Area will grow to 8,000 people in a 12-hour festival and symposium including both daytime and nighttime events lasting from 2pm to 2am. It will be a unique event that features participatory science, space-themed art and technology exhibits, live music and dance, and discussion about science, technology, space, and the future of our species. The theme for this year's event, "Radical Technology for a Sustainable Future," will encourage participants to reflect on how humans survive in the ultimate resource-starved environment - outer space and how space technology and research can help us to better prepare for a sustainable future on Earth.Participants will join in discussions hosted by local science and technology clubs, learn new skills in hands-on workshops, and engage with the work done at NASA Ames through tours of the facility.The hangar and adjoining tarmac will be filled with space and sustainability-inspired art exhibits and interactive technology and science demonstrations, including innovations in robotics, engineering, chemistry, and astronomy, all presented by NASA and Bay Area scientists and engineers. All this will occur in a festival atmosphere featuring world-class musical performances, acrobatics, and dance.

Posted by canida 10 years ago


Where do I get my science?

Since joining Instructables at the end of September, I've jumped into several discussions of scientific topics, not all of which are directly related to my specialty (experimental high energy physics). Why should I pose as any more of an "expert" in these different areas than anyone else?Well, I shouldn't (pose, that is). In the interests of disclosure, I thought I'd post some of my general sources for scientific information. I'm also hoping these might turn out to be of interest to other I'bles community members. PhysicsFor current research, I skim the arXiv preprint archives every day or two and see what's out there. These are technical papers intended for peer-reviewed journals, so they are generally not accessible to the lay public.Physics Today This is a "general interest" publication of the American Physical Society, intended for physicists but not for subfield specialists.PhysicsWorld from the IOP, similar to Physics Today. Non-physics ResearchNatureScienceBoth are peer-reviewed journals, but cover a full range of fields, including physics, chemistry, biology, astronomy, and more. Popular Science NewsNew Scientst Generally good, but also includes a sprinkling of non-traditional speculative articles, so be a bit on your guard!Science NewsScientific American I actually get this one on paper, in the mail...I also highly recommend the Science & Technology articles in The Economist. As I've commented elsewhere, they have some of the best (both in language and in technical detail) journalistic coverage of science that I have found anywhere.Update 15 Nov 2008: With thanks to GorillazMiko,Science Daily Books, Books, BooksI read. A lot. Stephen Jay Gould, John McPhee, Oliver Sacks, a wide variety of "popular" science books.

Posted by kelseymh 10 years ago


Pager motors: Removing weight and driving wheels

Hello fellow life forms, I am currently working volunteerily at a local school, teaching young kids a bit about telescopes and astronomy. One topic I am currently planning is the mars rover(s) and I am planning on building a simple line follower as activity. As the budget is very low but I still want the kids to be able to build something to take home I am trying to keep it as simple as possible. After I ordered a pager/iphone motor a year back or so, I now ordered 100 vibration motors for $28.50 at aliexpress. http://www.aliexpress.com/snapshot/6020160679.html They work fine but are smaller then the one I had before, a rubbery encasing makes them the same form factor. http://www.ringohr.de/tmp6//motorbadpic001.jpg  http://www.ringohr.de/tmp6//motorbadpic002.jpg  (excuse the horrible pictures, I just have a older android phone) 1) The first problem is removing the weight. I have searched and found several tutorials (for example http://www.robotroom.com/TinyMotor.html) and aproaces, heat and regular pliers failed, for everything else I lack smaller tools.   I consider ordering those grip pliers here in germany, which one would be better? http://www.ebay.de/itm/Gripzange-extra-kurze-Baulange-100-mm-Neu-nur-3-95-505-incl-Versand-/151165386645?pt=DE_Baby_Kind_Baby_T%C3%BCr_Treppenschutz&hash;=item233228bf95 or http://www.ebay.de/itm/Mini-Schweisser-Gripzange-125-mm-mit-Feststellzange-Klemmzange-NEU-OVP-/261407967637?pt=DE_Baby_Kind_Baby_T%C3%BCr_Treppenschutz&hash;=item3cdd210995 I also considered a watch wrist band tool as I have only a limited set of tools,  http://www.ebay.de/itm/Stiftausdrucker-Armbandkurzer-Stiftentferner-Uhr-Federsteg-Uhrenstift-Entferner-/370981549407?pt=DE_Elektronik_Computer_Haushaltsger%C3%A4te_Staubsaugerbeutel_PM&hash;=item566039355f or http://www.ebay.de/itm/Armbandkurzen-Stiftaustreiber-Stiftausdrucker-Werkzeug-/131084177829?pt=Uhrmacherwerkzeug&hash;=item1e8539d1a5 or http://www.ebay.de/itm/1x-Stiftaustreiber-Stiftausdrucker-Zange-Uhrenwerkzeug-Uhrmacherwerkzeug-/310765191716?pt=Uhrmacherwerkzeug&hash;=item485b0c8224 But I don't think I can adapt them to hold the motors. Any other tricks? 2) The second problem is to drive small wheels with those motors. With the vibration weight attached I can't drive a small foam or cardboard wheel, neither via friction nor a rubber band/belt. I hope it will work once the weight is off. I hope I can solve this issue, else I am stuck with 100 motors that are only suitable for bristle bots ;-) The vibration is strong enoug to move something, also attaching the motors to a cardboard square and directly touch the ground seems to have enough power. I could use a 3d printer to print a gear, but I would like to keep it as simple as possible. Also the groove bearing + shrink tube drive I have seen on another project would not be ideal to build with younger children. I initially was thinking of using bottle caps as wheels and wrap the motor axis with shrink tubing or isolation tape to drive the bottle cap by friction. Thanks for any ideas, advice or suggestions! -Marcus

Posted by schorhr 4 years ago


Yuri's Night Bay Area: updated science/tech/art lineup announced

Prepare for Liftoff! www.worldspaceparty.org Get ready for something entirely different. On April 13th the Bay Area joins the world in celebration of space exploration in a unique convergence of artists, scientists, astronauts, performers and musicians. Yuri's Night is a commemoration of humankind’s first venture into space, by Russian Cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin. This gathering bridges national, cultural, generational and social barriers to ignite excitement about what is new on the horizon in space exploration and to remind us of the magnificent feats humanity is capable of. Yuri's Night Bay Area will be held at Moffett Field in the NASA Ames Research Center's massive SOFIA hangar, home to the world's largest aerial observatory. Our host for the evening is pioneering space traveler Anousheh Anasari, the first privately funded female to reach orbit. She is joined by Dr. Chris McKay, world renowned expert in astrobiology and terraformation with the Space Science Division of NASA Ames Research Center, as they welcome you to a dazzling array of interactive art installations and science demos, interwoven with musical and acrobatic performances by some of the world's finest entertainers. Cutting-edge interactive technology and live demos will include: Neuro feedback games and visualizations including Telekinetic Asteroids and Mind RipplesExplorations of the world through NASA World Wind and Gigapan, the high-resolution panorama projectPortals into Second Life and Burning Man Earth, Google's Black Rock City browserA roofless stargazing lounge, with an exceptional telescope provided by NASASquidlabs' Instructables and ground-breaking kite technologyScience demonstrations and innovations from the worlds of robotics, engineering, biology and astronomy, will also be on display: A talk and interactive demos from a senior SETI scientist on efforts to detect earthquakes from spaceExplorations of Techgnosis by Erik DavisInteractive next-generation science data visualization software from NASA Ames' Astrophysics DivisionRobots from Justin Gray, Carnegie Mellon University, and NASA, including the next generation of roversExclusive heavenly imagery from SloohDisplays of microbial fossils, live microbial mats, and magnetic and fluorescent bacteriaASME's human-powered vehiclesEngage with space-inspired and technology-infused art installations, including: StarZipper, the 200 foot high installation powered by LEDs and Helium created by internationally renowned artist Michael Light and collaborator Dave RattrayPeter Foucault's self-propelled motion sensor Drawing RobotsSpot Draves' collaborative evolutionary high-definition visual algorithm generator, Electric SheepDynamically inflating sculptures by AKAirwaysHypKnowTron and ChakraTron, the interactive light sculptures by GaspoExperience rare video works documenting art in space: Matières Chorégraphiques by Kitsou Dubois, celebrated French dancer, choreographer and artistic director of Ki ProductionsProjects from the Zero Gravity Arts Consortium, Lowry Burgess's monumental project The Seed of the Infinite Absolute, Lorelei Lisowsky, and Frank Pietronigro's 'Drift Painting' in microgravityMeet Japan's space artist Ayako Ono and watch Jean Luc Soret's Space Art videos, direct from Paris's International @rt Outsiders Festival.The Documentary Dome, featuring our planet's greatest space documentariesWitness awe-inspiring space-themed performances by an armada of acrobats and dancers, featuring: KC Bella Fuega and Spiral Hoop Dance (orbital hooping and bellydance)Flowtoys (celestial light performance and UFO flowplanes)VigilAntiUP (intergalactic stilting)A Parade from the Future (with cutting edge Bay Area circuit benders and other worldly creatures).Live dance and acrobatics fused with audiovisual performances, will be coordinated with a world-class lineup of live electronic music: PLAID - Warp Records, UK TELEFON TEL AVIV - Hefty Records, Chicago (special early evening set) BLUETECH - Aleph Zero, Native State, Portland OOAH + BORETA - Glitch Mob, LA/SF SUTEKH - Context, Soul Jazz, Leaf MR. PROJECTILE & JONAH SHARP (aka SPACETIME CONTINUUM) - Merck, Reflective, Astralwerks RD - Designed Disorder, Glitch Mob, LA WELDER - Cyberset MOZAIC - Nexus DR. TOAST - False Profit Music environs will be complimented by a team of visual artists -- including KOSHO, CELESTINESTAR, RECURSIVEVIDEOLAB and VIBERATION -- spinning light into space throughout the night. Meanwhile, outside on the tarmac, the SPACE COWBOYS will have their own dynamic lineup of djs aboard their interstellar party transporter, the UNIMOG. Also on the tarmac will be Playaflies and Rabbit in the Moon's outside VJ set PLUS large scale sculpture and multimedia installations from the bay area's finest and beyond. This year’s theme is the greenification of space. The event is bio-diesel powered, a variety of organic food and drink will be available, waste products will be composted and recycled, and one tree will be planted for every ticket sold in an effort to offset the event's carbon emissions. Come join us in celebrating the accomplishments of mankind on a collective cosmic journey to the depths of space and beyond. Brought to you by Nexus, Symbiosis and so many others. *********************** Friday, April 13th, 2007 Event opens at 6:30pm NASA Ames Research Center* Moffett Field, Mountain View, CA, 94035 Tickets are on sale now. Limited $30 presale tickets still available, but not for long! Purchase advance tickets at: http://www.worldspaceparty.com/tickets.phpLimited VIP tickets available. Privileges include: VIP room overlooking the main floor, open bar and food throughout the evening, a chance to meet silicon valley innovators and dynamic thinkers, exclusive Bay Area Yuri's Night memorabilia and much more to be announced. PLUS! Space Cadets are invited to go weightless and experience zero-gravity on Sunday, April 22, 2007! This unique VIP experience will provide you with a ZeroG flight flown from San Jose International Airport PLUS exclusive access to all Yuri's Night Bay Area 2007 events. 3-2-1 Liftoff! VIP Flight Tickets $5,000.00 each. Email zerogartists@mac.com to reserve your seat today. Don't let this zero gravity opportunity to fly float by! As always, please check www.worldspaceparty.com for the latest… Yuri's Night Bay Area Crew, Over and Out. End Transmission.++++++ Any special requirements for individuals with disabilities should be related to the event staff or security, and reasonable arrangements will promptly be made. An ADA/Handicap parking lot will be available and marked with signs. References to NASA Ames shall not be construed as official NASA approval or endorsement of any non-Governmental or commercial entity or activity.

Posted by lannanh 11 years ago