Changing the Chins dust?

Hiyas how much sould i change the chinchillas dust?

Asked by juicymoose 7 years ago  |  last reply 7 years ago


blackberry curve dust

I have my blackberry curve for 2 months an it has dust stuck inside the screen does anyone know how to take it out its really annoying

Posted by Tanners 11 years ago


Bio dust grinder?

I have seen this video on Youtube and was wondering if anyone new how to make this machine or any ideas. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wW2GC_wFkaM

Asked by x3wayassassin 6 years ago  |  last reply 6 years ago


How do you make a haunted house dusty like in the movies?

How do you make a haunted house dusty like in the movies? So that everything looks like it's been there for years. I was guessing that they use a burlap sack full or flour and pigments and toss it about, but does anyone have other ideas? My friend wants to make an authentic looking haunted house.

Posted by goosezilla 10 years ago  |  last reply 6 years ago


has anyone made a dust separator for a wood shop dust collector?

Oneida and other companies make a dust separator that uses cyclone action to separate the chips and dust from the airstream before it gets to the dust collector and clogs the filter. Has anyone done an instrucable showing how to build something like this?

Asked by rmelchiori 9 years ago  |  last reply 7 years ago


How can I clean out the crinkly pipes in a forced air heating system?

I live in an RV and am allergic to dust and animals - the forced air heating plays havoc with my allergies. Is there some kind of duster on a flexible rod I could use to get rid of some of the accumulated muck that's doubtless in the tubes? Or something I could stick on the end of a carbon fiber tent pole? The ducts are about 10' long, curve around 90 degrees (over the space of a couple of feet) and are similar to the vents you get from dryers.

Asked by ImmortalSoFar 9 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


dust protection for computer and router?

Im the designer for a plastic/wood furniture shop. I'm having problems keeping dust from computers, even with equipment not in the workshop.  (office on the side) what would be the best design to keep airflow for computers and hardware but minimize the dust. Thansk. https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/19129520/Photo%20Jan%2016%2C%202%2035%2047%20PM.jpg

Asked by ebaltierrez 4 years ago  |  last reply 4 years ago


Adruino cyclone dust sensor

I am looking for suggestions for building a wood chip / dust level detector for the collection can of a cyclone vacuum. I have tried using uv detectors, they get covered in fine dust and become in-effective.  I am thinking of using the ultrasonic sensor. My objective is to detect the level of chips and dust collected in the debris can, and sounding an alarm when the can gets to the full point. Any help on this subject would be appreciated.  I am new to working with these Adruino controllers and not real familiar with writing the Sketches for this. Thanks Don

Posted by Don D 1 year ago  |  last reply 1 year ago


What thing is that red dust? Answered

I am seeing this video about forge welding, and it lacks of captions. Then, I can't understand a word of the speech. At minute 2:20 the smith takes a can containing a dark red dust. ¿what is it? THANKS, anglophones!

Asked by rimar2000 7 years ago  |  last reply 7 years ago


Dust shield for midi-lathe?

I recently snagged a midi lathe to teach myself how to lathe. However, I live in a studio apartment. My landlord has approved the lathe and use of it, however, I did not realize just how much dust this produces. As such, I was wondering if anyone has made or knows of someone who has made a dust shield for a midi lathe. Preferable, collapsible. 

Asked by DoctorWoo 3 years ago  |  last reply 3 years ago


Coal Grit / dust / powder. Answered

Hi everyone.Please help. I have a lot of coal and anthracite grit / powder left over after emptying the bags. Is there anyway I can use the grit / powder or is there a way I can compress it to use in my indoor fireplace?

Asked by zorro5313 8 years ago  |  last reply 8 years ago


Dust 514 Scout fabrication

Hello I am new here and this is my first undertaking but ever since i saw these i knew for a fact i wanted one of these suits they are on  game called Dust 514 they are kind of the infiltrators and stuff the secret behind the lines type of soldier. anyways i want to fabricate one of these suits that is useable and look almost just like it it NEEDS COOLING but that will be a pain i want fans in my helmet and liquid or air cooled main body... i want to be able to use this, go to a theme park and have people take pictures of me XD of course there is easier ways to do this but i really want one of these and i am not sure where on earth to start so any type of help well... helps i would like mine grey and black and the lighting isn't very important

Posted by arf1049 5 years ago  |  last reply 5 years ago


wet scrubber

I am setting up a factory for making vacuum-formed acrylic shower bases reinforced with fiberglass. I will be dealing with resin fumes, microscopic glass fibers (from cutting and handling the fiberglass batts) and larger dust particles of acrylic, fiberglass and cured resin from cutting off the bottoms of these units. I am in China, and the factoryies I have seen merely have fans and blow the stuff outside, with some directing the dusty air over a bit of water that supposedly collects the dust. Being from Canada I cannot accept such a poor solution, but my newly hired employee seems to think that the concept is best. I will be looking into cyclone systems, of which a few posts are made on this site, but can anyone post a fairly simple instructable on how to make a water based system for collecting the dust?

Posted by WHET 8 years ago  |  last reply 8 years ago


My integrated stereo amplifier periodically stops working. Why does vacuuming it out fix it?

I've written an Instructable about this here:How to Fix Your Stereo Amplifier (Harman Kardon HK 620). It just stopped working, and again I vacuumed it out, fixing it. Others have shared similar experiences, but I don't know why it works.When the amp "stops working" everything but the amplifier appears to work: all the LEDs turn on, external devices plugged into the switched and non-switched 120 VAC ports energize, and the signal path out of the "tape 1 out" works.There's no visible dust inside the amp. I don't think it's a loose wire because "pretend" vacuuming (or shaking for that matter) has no effect. Do you have any ideas?

Asked by ewilhelm 10 years ago  |  last reply 2 years ago


Electric Cooker Element Grey Dust

My kenwood cooker was sparking and deposited a grey dust inside

Asked by idlea 2 years ago  |  last reply 2 years ago


dust under my laptop screen?

I have a pavilion dv7 and i have some spots on my screen and it looks like it could be dust. is there anyway i can take the screen apart for i can clean it? thank you

Asked by 9 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


Vacuum cleaner as wood dust collection?

I was wondering if it is possible to use a vacuum cleaner as a form on wood dust collection in my workshop. What type of vacuum clearer would be the best for this, one with a bag, bagless, whatever. If this is possible, what precautions should be taken to ensure smooth operation of this setup. I'm worried about wood dust possibly clogging up the vacuum cleaner. Any help/ more info/ ideas/ would be great.

Posted by SirMalan 9 years ago  |  last reply 4 years ago


dust cleaning inside computer things. Answered

We live in a dusty area. Not afraid anymore to open this upc (think its called) and gathering a nice little heap of dust from the lamina-thing between fan and bigchip every month or so, while at it, could i do more to keep this machine healthy? 

Asked by tekaka 8 years ago  |  last reply 7 years ago


Punctured speaker dust cover (bubble)

I punctured the dust cover (the centermost part of the speaker that looks like half of a ball) of a Sonance Visual Performance VP65 speaker.  The puncture is about 1/4 inch in diameter and did not touch any of the internal parts. Can this be repaired?  Will it affect the performance of the speaker?

Posted by edieppa2 6 years ago  |  last reply 6 years ago


disk saw + vacuum cleaner = less dust ?

When cutting bricks and concrete with disk saw there are clouds of dust. here is my failed attempt to reduce its amount using a vacuum cleaner instructable anyway ?

Posted by 11010010110 10 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago


How can I make a sensor that will turn off my dust collector when the bin is full?

I am installing a cyclone dust collector in my workshop, and I want to make a sensor that will determine when my dust bin is full so that the chips and dust won't overflow into the filters.  I'm thinking garage door sensors could be blocked by sawdust rising into the transparent flex hose between the cyclone and bin, but I'm not sure how they work.  I would use them to turn on a warning light and turn off the dust collector.  Any ideas?  I'm good with tinkering and basic electricity, but am stuck trying to figure this out.

Asked by woodwringer 3 years ago  |  last reply 3 years ago



For airflow would a filter be better placed prior to or after the main fan? Answered

I am looking to build a very simple air filter setup to help reduce dust and cat particles in the air while deep cleaning.  Would I be better off putting the filter on the front side (air out) or back side (air in) of the fan.  I know to keep dust off of the fan itself the back may be better but will i get better air flow with it on the front?  Thanks for any info.

Asked by kinderdm 6 years ago  |  last reply 4 years ago


Computers at/near the sea? Answered

I am living 100 meters from the sea which results in high humidity from time to time. Got the message this morning: CPU fan has failed. Discovered  a lot of moisture inside my pc and the dust in the fan has become muddy. We had a lot of rain and mist of late.  What does the people on ships do? And others who live this close to the sea? I would really appreciate ideas on what to do to prevent that from happening again.

Asked by tishza 9 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


Rainbow vac for dremmeling?

Is this a good idea or no? I'm sure a few people on here know what a rainbow vac is, and it has the suction to work (although I try to use the low-speed mode if I can because it's a loud vacuum). I emptied it today however and there was metallic crap EVERYWHERE on the inside of the bowl. It wasn't that bad actually and washed out with water. But I was wondering, should I maybe use something like some dryer vent and make a plate to fit into my window?

Posted by Punkguyta 10 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago


Shop dust collection, computational fluid dynamics HELP needed

My plan is to build a shop dust collection system (probably two stage) using a house furnace blower as the "blower" for the system. They are cheap, readily available, quiet and multiple speed. The help I need is the design/ sizing of the collection bag. Thanks for your help, Carpe Ductum

Posted by naic98 11 years ago  |  last reply 11 years ago


Oceans?

If the earth is made of by a lot of dust collecting in space due to gravity how did water form on earth?

Asked by mayney93 9 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


3D Printed USB Dust Plug - Leaf Style

Buy at Shapeways. 3D Printed and Tested. It's used to seal the idling USB ports on your electronic devices, protecting them from dust, coffee / water spill etc. The plug part seals the USB port.

Posted by 7PLAIN 6 years ago  |  last reply 6 years ago


Shop Vacuum Hose Adapters

The more I try and understand the nightmare that the shop vacuum hose and adapter issue has become, the more I have to believe Washington was involved in its design. There is apparently no more oversight of this industry than there was over Wall Street and the banks that led to the second great depression... Can someone tell me where a person can find a source that makes real problem solving adapters, and tells you the true inside and outside diameters of both ends instead of contributing to the confusion of this national mystery? Thanks

Posted by TerrifiedCitizen 4 years ago  |  last reply 4 years ago


Tool-activated shopvac for dust collection? A relay for activating a shopvac for dust collection when a tool is started

Some expensive shopvacs can be "tool activated", meaning that the shopvac hose can be attached to the dust port of chop saw, sander, router table, etc, and the shopvac turned on or energized when a relay device detects that the attached tool is drawing power.  It saves trips between the shopvac and the tool, making automatic dust collection at the point of dust generation more practical. Off the shelf solutions are $50 to $80, usually consisting of a short extension cord with two outlet sockets.  A power draw on one outlet energizes the other.  The theory is simple enough that I can't think of a good excuse for why it couldn't be done with stock components.  

Asked by joel.will 7 years ago  |  last reply 2 years ago


Sawing MotherBoard PCB's- Inhaling Dangerous Dust Particles? Answered

I have recently salvage a couple MotherBoard PCB's, And I was wondering if I cut them (saw them with a hacksaw) Will they give off a lot of dangerous dust? I've heard people talk about the fact that it's dangerous, So I was wondering it it really is. If it is, I thing I'll score the PCB's with a utility knife, Or just throw them away

Asked by Yonatan24 3 years ago  |  last reply 3 years ago


Ducted vacuum cleaner anyone?

My sister approached me today with the news that her vacuum cleaner went up in smoke.While cleaning out the old rental and with the aim to clean the new home during the next few days.This made me thinking about the the ducted vacuum system that were quite popular around here.Most modern house won't get something like that and for the older ones it means once they fail they stay dead.After all the tenant can buy a vacuum cleaner to clean the carpets...Anyways...I had a look around here and in other places to check on home made solutions of the more modern type.As my sister is allowed some DIY to improve the quite old house I was wondering about installing a ducted vacuum system.Of course there is not much out there, commercially, that would be up to our modern times.Far too noisy, lack of sucktion and despite all totally outdated filter systems that won't keep the turbine or motor clean.Some people however came up with quite clever ideas.For example building your own cyclonic shop vac.Another one I quite liked was was a home made housing for standard drum type shop vac.Apart from the air noise the thing was almost silent.No screaming motor, no outcoming air acting as a funnel for the noise create.The air going in and through the hose was louder then the actual vacuum cleaner LOLI would like to create something similar by salvaging a proper shop vac as a bas for the sucking part.But as it is an old house I would really like a wooden solution to entire housing and casing problem.Not just a screaming thing mounted to the outside of the house....Far less noisy than the donor, cyclonic (proper) seperator and easy to empty.Like place a bag under it and open the bottom easy.Something originally intended for inside use might be weatherproved or placed in a properly covered area if required.Any ideas for the wooden part apart from starting from scratch with 3D models?Anyone here done something similar and willing to provide some feedback on how well it all performs?

Posted by Downunder35m 5 weeks ago  |  last reply 5 weeks ago


I think I inhaled a bit of cement dust...

Although I did my mixing outside (on a semi-rainy day) and held my breath while pouring the cement powder, I think I might have inhaled a tiny bit. Not a lot, but enough for a bit of coughing afterwards. The coughing is over, but my throat now feels slightly sore, but not bad enough that I want to contact a doctor. Mostly just a bit irritated, that I hope will pass. But can I eat or drink anything that might help this pass quicker? For lubricating the throat or something. Or will it go away eventually?

Posted by Mikki G.W 1 year ago  |  last reply 1 year ago


Extreme water cooling idea for computer chilling plus dust protection

I started to play around with some compressor cooling devices, otherwise known as fridges, freezers or airconditioners ;) As with everything it started with a lot of reading, some doing, more reading, well you get the point... Anyways, I am now running an old and portable split airconditioner on hydrocarbons instead of the already escaped R22 refrigerant. With all this experimenting I got reminded that my computer does not really like to do hard gaming work on these hot days. There are already a lot of infos out there on how to use water and/or heatpipes to cool your system. One thing that they all have in common is that you need a chiller to cool the water. Now, there are really tons of options here - from using an old bar fridge to hold the water up to big direct chillers that can be used 24/7 and cost a small fortune. Here in Victoria the weather might be more forgiving but up north the humidity will be your main enemy if you want to use any decent cooling system. Imagine 90% humitiy and the water condensing on pipes and coolers inside your computer... Some systems compensate here by using a temp of around 12°C at the lowest to minimise the risk of condensation. But I think we can do better for cheaper if we are willing to get dirty and salvage some scrap. If it also a great way to protect your computer in a dusty and hot workshop enviroment! Let me explain the thought: Considering the costs for a decent air cooled system over the expense for just a basic water cooling kit it might be worth spending the extra money otherwise. What makes a normal and not overclocked computer go too hot assuming it is clean and free from dust? Right - the outside temperature and how hard we actually use it. Normal systems are designed to work at a room temp between 18 and 24°C, we are often lucky to have it under 30 in the summer. Getting a CPU to just under 70° if the outside air is already over 30° is hard if not impossible. But what if the computer would be in one of these fancy server rooms that are kept at 16° throughout the year? Problem solved, just win the lottery to get your server room build. Step back a bit and think again ;) If we make an additional and well insulated enclosure to put the computer in we would only need to worry about making it pretty much air tight and keeping the inside always under 20°C. Now follow me to my imaginary shopping trip... First step is getting a decent sized cooler box - you can build your own of course I would go for these oversizes Esky chests. Next step is a visit to the local hard rubbish collection or scrap yard. We look for a bar fridge or water cooling tower that has a condenser that will fit on the side or back of our cooling box. Prefer something old running on R22 instead of R134a if you can. If the system already has one or two service ports for filling even better, otherwise see you get one from a different fridge or freezer. The fun starts back home where we now make a big mess. The cooling system needs to come apart and if not a tower the fridge around it has to go without damaging pipes or condensers. Perfect would be to have a working system and to keep it in this condition to avoid the illegal escape or refrigerant. It also make it easier than having to refill it again. On the other hand getting a system that is already professionally evacuated as most scrap yards now do anyway can make the modding easier - up to your skill set and options to have the system checked and filled. Once we have a naked cooling system we get the cold side into the cooler box. Either by creating a slot to slide it in or by feeding the hoses through holes if you plan to do your own thing in terms of testing and filling. The compressor part and "hot side" are mounted securely to the outside of the box. If you still have the thermostat working and connected you can now check your homebuild fridge. To get the computer inside you have several option, IMHO the easiest is use one big enough hole to get all cables to the outside. You want this hole to end up as airtight as possible, I found candle wax to be a good sealer if you place some painters tape on the box first. So far this was the easy part, the hard part is now to make sure the humidity inside the box stays as low as possible. When the compressor starts cooling the evaporator will go to very low temperatures, even if you set the thermostat to 10° the cold side will condese or even freeze the moisture in the air. Unlike with direct cooling option inside your computer we now have a "cold trap" outside the coputer that we use to our advantage! Easiest option here is to have a catchment under the cold side to collect the condensing water and to let it discharge through a small tube to the outside. Once the system was operating for a few days there should be no moisture left inside our box unless it is not properly sealed. At this point you could be tempted to just set the thermostat to the coldest possible - I advise against it! Imagine the inside of the box is below freezing - the capacitors won't like it to start with and since we now have all surface subcooled the moisture can condense everywhere not warm enough, including your mainboard. A temp of around 10°C should be more than enough for normal gaming and gives the compressor a chance to turn off every now and then so any ice can drop off and exit. If you like the idea use it and make a featured Instructable out of it, my time is too limited at the moment to get serious with this.

Posted by Downunder35m 2 years ago  |  last reply 2 years ago


Anyone use a Car air filter for home use?

Hello all~! An Idea just flew in my mind! Has anyone used or thought of using a Car air filter for home use? my primitive plan says a Car filter (My car's looks like a tunnel/Chimney) with a high CFM computer Fan mounted on top. The fan would be driven on 12v Adapter (or 9v for silence and life) and would suck air through the filter. The dust would then stick to the outside surfaces of the filter, which can be brushed off / Vacumed later. Any Pros/ Cons/ Ideas? Jump in! People!

Posted by bhvm 6 years ago  |  last reply 3 years ago


how do dust affect my performance in my computer?

How can i explain this factors which affect my computer! 1.Excessive temperature 2.Human being 3.Power outrage 4.Corrosion 5.Viruses 6.noise 7.Dust building up

Asked by 9 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


Will a cyclone dust separator improve the performance of my central vac?

Before I replace the central vac "unit" I need to check a few things - like air leaks, blockages etc..I remembered seeing a cyclone dust separator hwo-to on Instructables and because, when it comes to physics,I am a complete idiot, I wonderd whether building such a thing as an adjunct to my central vac unit will improveperformance in any way.Thanks,AMS

Asked by zombateen 9 months ago  |  last reply 8 months ago


Hoover modification: Making the dust go directly into a big bin

In my collective woodworkshop, we have a lot of problems with sawdustOne person attached a vacuum cleaner to our tablesaw to suck up most of the dust, but the problem with that is that the hooverbags fill up too quickly.So I am trying to make it so that the sawdust will go directly into our sawdust bin after being sucked into the hoover.I want to cut off part of the bottom of the hoover and attach a coneshape making the dust fall into a bin. I also want to attach a cut up vaccum bag to the cone, to make less dust fly dirctly out of the exaust port.I have been reading up on hoovers, and I am worried that the suction will disappear if there is a great big hole, not allowing the "vacuum" in "vacuum cleaner" to happen.Update:Yup, you definitely need to not have a hole in the bottom of your hoover to create a vacuum. Now I want to try something with creating a direct way to the exaust port, so that the dust just flies out of there...HELPI haven't been able to find any modification like this, but please post some if you have.I am going to jump into this, but I would love some input and ideas.It's a Miele S311i, I can't find detailed manuals on the product... I'll be updating on my progressHope someone can help!

Asked by Buildmeaboat 8 months ago  |  last reply 8 months ago


TEDxBaghdad - Iraq - violence, dust storms and open sourced manufacturing

Baghdad Iraq. It was once the jewel of the Muslim empire and epicenter of knowledge in the Eastern world. Now it is best known for corrupt governance, bombings, and dust storms. It was also my parents’ home. After visiting once in 1991 as a child the few memories I have of Iraq seemed to be shouting matches as my parents yelled over the phone making overseas calls. Names of Uncles I had never met were mentioned and a phone was handed to me and I was left to nervously fend for myself with my weak Iraqi slang and an Uncle who apparently knew all about me while I knew nothing of him. The country was an impenetrable black box to me that would spit out another refugee somewhere in the world every few years or so. Sixteen years later the first wall between Iraq and me was broken. In 2007 my nuclear family had traveled to Syria and for the first time I met family members who still lived in Baghdad. I knew them now. My uncles and cousins grew flesh and blood. I could feel their prickly faces as we greeted with the traditional Iraqi 4 sided cheek kiss. They could graciously give me their dishdashas as gifts. Names finally had faces, but those faces were deep, sunken and afraid. 2007 was a bad year of sectarian war in Iraq, which is why the Damascas district of Harasta was flooded with Iraqis. The sound of construction continued through the night to keep up with the massive (ab)use of the "tourist" visas. I saw something in the Iraqis in Syria that I hadn't seen before; something that scared me. I saw hopelessness. It was then I settled on a long-term project to return to the country and share something that I had just discovered around the same time: the future doesn’t come prepared -- we make the future. The do-it-yourself attitude that was growing in America was being combined with the culture of sharing that you find in hackerspaces, at instructables.com and in open source technology. This atmosphere made anything possible. You want to build a vertical generator without any spinning parts? Sure! How about a walking quadraped robot with a sofa? Do you want to quit your job, write zines and sell them in the crafting circle? Sure! Start a business! Write a novel! Organize a benefit concert! Sure - sure - sure! “Make your own future” was the message. It was a message of hope - it was the message that I wanted to share in the Middle East, and especially in Iraq. In 2011 the opportunity to work on sharing this beautiful message in the Middle East presented itself to me, so I quit my robotics job and took it (sorry Andrew). A few friends and I started a tiny organization called GEMSI - The Global Entrepreneurship and Maker Space Initiative. We funded ourselves through Kickstarter and our first project was a Three-Day Maker Space hosted at Makerfaire Africa. We were hoping to let people experience the feeling of the Maker Movement first-hand. We collaborated with Emeka and the team from MFA, Cairo Hackerspace, along with many amazing egyptians from all over the country. We had a successful first attempt at sharing the message of "Yes you can!” It was a great start, but Iraq was still an impenetrable fortress to me. It took till 2012 and a chance encounter with friends in Cambridge, MA for me to find my first avenue back into Iraq. Via my friends, I met someone who’s friend was affiliated with TEDxBaghdad. A few steps removed, sure, but when I heard about TEDxBaghdad I knew I had found my way in. I knew TEDx and the types of programs they hosted; I knew they were hopeful, inspired, and shared a vision for a brighter tomorrow. I started communicating with Emeka from MFA, who also works with TED, and he put me in touch with Yahay. After my first skype call with Yahay I knew I was going. Someone else had done it - someone broke that barrier, did amazing work in the country, and survived. It wasn't the death trap my family was telling me it was. There was a new narrative being woven and I knew what I needed to do. I booked my flights before I even finalized any workshops. I needed to meet the TEDxBaghdad team. Later, I called my parents and told them I was going to Baghdad and they said, "Shinu?! Inta Makhabal?!" That probably means exactly what you think it does. Needless to say, they had their concerns, but I was going regardless. Now that the tickets were bought, we started planning. Yahay put me in touch with Abdal Ghany, one of the Iraqi organizers living in Baghdad. He coordinated everything. It was amazing. These guys kick some serious planning butt! Ghany basically told me, “Show up and give your workshop. We'll take care of the rest.” This was a welcome change from the hours of facebooking, planning, and coordination I usually have to go through to schedule events. It really seemed like this was possible. I was going to give an Arduino and 3D printing workshop in Baghdad and I was really excited! I sent an email to Sparkfun and Makezine asking them for open source electronics donations since I knew bringing my electronics box through the airport wouldn't be a good idea. They sent me a nice goodie-bag of beautifully packaged Maker products. These two organizations have given me a tremendous amount of help throughout the years, for which I am extremely thankful. I packed a suitcase filled with 2 3D printers, 25 Arduinos, an assortment of other open source hardware and sensors and headed out looking a bit like a bomb development lab. Yeesh! Somehow I made it through China, Saudi, and Turkey without any serious interrogation. Mostly just really quizzical looks from my unzipped bag up back to me... "You're a teacher?" they ask. "Yes," I say, "yes I am." Turkey was the stop before Iraq. Turkey was brilliant, sunny, lush, and seemed to be comprised of mostly happy smiling people walking by the sea. Coming from the deserts of Mecca, this was a welcome sight. I let the green of Turkey wash away the dust of Saudi Arabia. The mishmash of cultures, sounds, foods, religions gave me a great feeling of liberation. This was a lively place and the two hackerspaces I met up with there, Base Istanbul and Istanbul Hackerspace were fantastic hosts. Furkan and I spent a lovely day together chatting about Maker culture as it spreads through the Middle East and then in the end we had a potluck BBQ with members from both hackerspaces by the rocks of the sea. It was great to see these two Turkish hackerspaces and to be reminded that this movement is truly global. My dream of hackerspaces empowering people globally is really possible – and it’s great to know that it is a dream that is shared by others. I left them full of enthusiasm and flew directly to Baghdad. Landing in Baghdad was strange and a bit concerning. Looking out of the window all I could see was a brown cloud. We were landing in a dust storm. I had heard about the turab (dust) of Iraq, but this was the first time I saw it in person, and it would be one of the things most often on my mind. Getting a visa for me was surprisingly easy, except for the fact I forgot my passport on the plane and two guards had to escort me one to each side back to the airplane to retrieve it. But once I had my passport, I told them my laqab, which is the full name that includes ancestry. Showed them a copy of my dad’s passport and my Iraqi birth certificate and I was in. I was hoping for a nice stamp, perhaps with some Iraqi relic on it. But they took my passport and wrote in it: "Originally Iraqi", so there it goes, it's official. Ahmed, my cousin, was not at the airport when I took my paper work and headed out to the lobby. The airport was sparsely populated and heavily regulated. I barely managed to snap a picture before a guard came up to me and had me delete them from my phone. In the lobby I met a man just released from a Swiss prison. The Swiss had given him the option to be sent back home to Iraq, or be jailed. He chose to leave and come back to Iraq. This becomes a theme later as I see more and more people, all of whom desire to leave the country to become refugees elsewhere. It seems that when hope runs out for the country you live in, the only option is to find a new one. This story is one of a million various stories of struggling to find a new life. Each varies in its details, but all have survival at their core. Ahmed arrives 30 minutes late, apologizing. He's wearing jeans and a polo. His hair seemed freshly cut and his face was serious. We had never met before. The only thing I knew of him was that he thought I was reckless for coming. He had been spending hours on Skype with me attempting to convince me that coming would be a bad idea: "You have no idea how bad the bugs are. Just wait till you see the dust storms. The heat will kill you... etc" But once I saw him in person it all changed. I didn't think I'd grow to like Ahmed, but I grew to appreciate his ways and he became like a brother to me before I left. He took me to Mansour, a neighborhood in Baghdad, telling me stories about Iraq as we travelled. This is the neighborhood where the house my dad designed and family built stands. On the ride home we had our car checked for bombs at least 4 times by what Iraqi's call Saytarat, which is the equivalent of a checkpoint and, to me, seemed a total nuciance. They were the reason he was late. What would normally be a 20 minute drive can become three hours long because every car is checked for bombs. They are everywhere; throughout the city, on every road. We passed the guard who watches over my family’s neighborhood, and he takes his hand off his machine gun to wave at Ahmed, and I begin to recognize that weapons, car inspections and burned out cars are normal here, so they don't think to comment on it - like an empty lot in Detroit, or the homeless in San Francisco. We got to my family home with no time to rest. I had to leave to meet up with Abdul Ghany and the crew at a Cafe in an hour and then conduct the workshop in two. Ahmed comes with me - he doesn't trust people we'd never met before and won’t let me out of his sight. I trust first till proven otherwise, he has learned to do the opposite. It’s a telling sign of how different our lives are on a day-to-day basis. As soon as I met the TEDxBaghdad crew, I felt at ease. MNA, Abdul Ghany and the entire crew were thoughtful, hardworking, and inspiring people. I was really happy to have intersected with them and they helped me in more ways than I could count. We first met up at Everyday, a local Mansour café. Everyday cafe was hyper airconditioned and everyone seemed to think it was hotter than it was. The crew was awesome, they were really a great first introduction to the excited young people of Baghdad and they certainly have the famed Iraqi hospitality. But here's a tip: do not order a fajita in Baghdad ;D. Mohammed Al-Samarraie pulled out their iPads and started showing me video production work he was doing for TEDx. Abdul Ghany comes a little late and we have head out to the workshop. The workshop was held in a two story office building surrounded by palm trees. Looking out the the tinted back window we could see the muddy river run past, winding and dark. Slowly the TEDx people started trickling in. Then I started to get nervous. The checkpoints didn't bother me, the tanks in the streets were not an issue, but here were these people coming to learn something from me. What could I share that would really matter to them when they had so much to deal with daily? What could I share that could be relevant to people who see bombings as I experience lightning storms? I have been to other places in the world to share this kind of information, and some of those places have had political problems and ongoing revolutions. But Iraq was the first country I had been to that really seemed like a war zone. I decided that first I needed to learn from them! What were their projects? What did they hope for? I hoped they would learn from each other and get excited about their projects and I wanted to be able to share things that were relevant to them. Thus, everyone was encouraged to talk about who they are, how they learned about TEDxBaghdad and to share their project, share with us their mission, or share an inspiring story. I was amazed to hear about all the incredible initiatives the crew was doing. From intercultural exchange programs, to street clean ups, to historical artifact preservation, each of them shared and I started realizing something. They were not as interested in new technology as they were interested in arts and culture and after hearing about a few of their projects I started realizing why. Learning about culture and paying attention to the arts gives people the ability to pay attention to details. They can look at another human being and see all the subtleties that make us who we are. We each fall in love, we struggle, we question, and have doubts. Arts give depth to a black and white world. Sectarianism is difficult when we pay attention to the commonalities that tie us all together. What would the world be like if anyone who wanted a weapons license was required to have visited India, could pass an art history exam and could play stairway to heaven on the guitar? We were in a sort of office building near the river which ran by dark and muddy looking through the tinted windows. One by one, they stood up in front and gave their short presentations. There were doctors, engineers, and designers in the crew. They each stood up and told the story of how they found out about TEDxBaghdad and it was incredible. Each of them had a friend recommend it to them, and it was mostly done through Facebook. Some people's projects were related to health, culture, antiquity preservation, and connecting Iraqis with the rest of the world. While they spoke I made a graph of the things that connected all of their ideas together. It was a beautiful thing to see. The common themes were to help Iraq as a country through the integration of new ideas and how to bring a new face of Iraq and present it to the world. To have the news about Iraq be about amazing things, inspiring things, rather than explosions. Being in that room with that energy made me feel like we were already on our way. I pulled out the boxes of donations given to us by Sparkfun and The Make Shed and now it was my turn. I told them about my story coming into contact with my friend Alex through instructables.com, how being in San Francisco and Cambridge opened my eyes to a new way of entrepreneurship using communities and open source technology. And how they could make anything they could imagine if they got together to do it. We discussed how sharing and collaboration was a common value that held the entire system together. I used the concept of the LED throwie, which is a simple idea by Graffiti Research Labs to connect an LED to a coin battery and a magnet. They used it to throw at ferrous buildings as a form of electronic graffiti but once they uploaded it to instructables the idea was out there and people were inspired to take it and derive many other projects. You can never know what will happen when you share something or when you create a tool and share it. People created outlined throwies, LED floaties in balloons and finally we start seeing LED floaties which are sequenced to act like a light show at a phish concert. Hahaha! We then talked about the Arduino an easy to use microcontroller designed for artists. It's a bit of technology that is a simple and easy to use platform to build interactive projects. We talked about how the open nature of the project people can use the Arduino and then use shields to add features like being able to connect to the internet or play MP3s. Open source tools make building new products a lot like using legos. We were in the middle of using some of the sensors The Maker Shed had sent us to make a DIY heart rate monitor when the power went out and all went dark except for the LED throwies we had made. It suddenly felt very intimate. We put all the LED throwies in the center of the room and huddled around it for story time. The feeling of connection was palpable for me. Sure the lack of power meant that we were not going to be able to 3D print, but being in the dark with TEDxBaghdad was one of my favorite memories of this trip. The lights went on and we had a long question and answer session / photo shoot. Some of the doctors were interested to use the Arduino based heart rate monitors to replace the broken ones in the hospital. I heard about this and was flabbergast that the most basic and cheap tools I had brought with me might have a direct impact and may even save lives. Technology might not solve the political problems of the country but it seems that there was a lot of room for development and that the crew I was with was creative and excited to make use of it. I passed out 20 Arduino kits that day, including the Lillypad which is a version of the Arduino intended to be sewn into clothing. Although there were very few engineers in the audience, everyone seemed to be buzzing with ideas and ways to use the Arduinos. What a great workshop! I was super excited because not only had they understood the message, they seem to have been infected with the feeling of capability! Now to seal the deal, we were all going to go out and eat a classic Iraqi dish Simach Masguf. Ahmed has been calling me hourly making sure that I was OK, but I felt safe enough with my new friends so we all headed out to a fish spot by the river. Hours go by, lots of fish is eaten, and lots of juice is drunk. Some of the crew smoke some sheesha. It was like I was with new old friends. My Iraqi slang was improving hourly and although we had just met I knew me and TEDxBaghdad we're going to be working together again very soon. I would have stayed all night eating and chatting about future projects and the problems to solve in Iraq, but the cerfew was about to set in and we had to jet. Yeah, there is still a curfew. On the ride home my head is filled with contradictions. Hope and confusion mix in my head as my family rings 4 more times. I get home safe and decide that the only way to deal with the complicated situation in Iraq was to act with irrational hope and optimism. That's the way TEDxBaghdad seemed to work. And that's going to be mine as well. The next day there were five explosions in Baghdad so TEDxBaghdad and I decided against going out to the Iraqi National Museum even though we had to request permission to go. We meet instead back at Everyday and there we solidify our commitment to working for a more beautiful Baghdad and a country which will become a producing nation once again. Sharing with the world it's art, science and literature like it once did years ago. +BG

Posted by lamedust 6 years ago  |  last reply 6 years ago


I want to make a simple power tool dust extraction device for a small workshop?

I have a electric motor from a flymo lawn mower and would like to use it to extract saw dust into a plastic drum. I have seen something like this along time ago and it worked well. What do I need to know about this principle. Any advice would be greatly received.

Asked by 9 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


How Do you Get dust out of an iPod Touch 4th Generation Screen?

Ive had it in my pocket. (duh.) and there is a lot of little particles that looks to be getting in through the Home button.

Asked by unominame 7 years ago  |  last reply 7 years ago


electret = brown's gas + rock dusts + high voltage during cooling?

Electret: a material that is electric like a magnet is magnetic. Using rock and silicate dusts, is it plausible/possible/simple enough to melt the rock/silicates in a crucible furnace, pour the mix into a mould ... which is polarised by a high tension DC voltage field: Upon cooling, the material is said to become a high voltage electric parallel of a magnet. The concept is simple enough, right? I think Hutchinson adds barium titanate to his crystal cells, which I believe her charges straight off the 90 degree spike from a HV coil. so ... polarisation ... like a magnet.    possible? plausible? doable? instructable!!  :D thankyou! Will

Asked by gwark 8 years ago  |  last reply 8 years ago


Does anybody have a set of plans for a downdraft sanding table using an old furnace blower?

I have seen numerous 'threads' and discussions on the subject, but no PLANS other than a few pictures.

Asked by GrumpyOldGoat 8 years ago  |  last reply 8 years ago


My canon SD 450 camera broke! Answered

When i turn it on the screen flashes E18. i looked up E18 and say's that this is caused but to much dust in the mechanical parts. Ive tried using compressed air to blow out dust from it but that didn't work. HELP!

Asked by Emsaid 9 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


sparkler water

I am currently brainstorming a firework ignition liquid that contains what i call (sparkler dust) sparklers work by a flame burning a concealed paper packet of (sparkler dust) once this ignites the sparkler sends colored sparks everywhere. now thought that would be an excellent ignition system for fireworks

Posted by HH Engineering 9 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


Fix tv that randomly turns on and off?

I have a hisnese 20-ish inch tv that is about 6 years old. It started having a problem about a year and a half ago where it randomly turned itself on and changed channels on its own. I opened it up and dusted it out (not much dust) and messed with the settings a bit and vola it worked. Well, then a few months ago it started up again. I dusted it out (not really anything) and it still had the problems. Then I just unplugged it and let it sit for a month. I tried it out and it worked fine for the past two months or so. Well, it started having the problems again and I dusted it out (really nothing) and it had no effect. Anyone know what I should do other than pay someone to fix it?

Asked by TOCO 7 years ago  |  last reply 3 years ago


can there be a electrostatic floor cleaner ?? .....important question. isn't it.? Answered

Electrostatic force attract objects......when we rub plastic with hair it attracts tiny bits of paper.....also it attracts dust and dirt ...so can there be a possible dust cleaner which using electrostatic force and  can clean our floor or something??there is only air cleaner otherwise

Asked by arihant 8 years ago  |  last reply 8 years ago


Star Trek Funeral

Go out in (some kind of) style in a Star Trek casket / coffin, or have your dust gather dust in a Star Trek urn Should have been out already, but not yet (via Gadgets for God at Ship of Fools) L Ashes to ashes, funk to funky, planet earth is blue and there's nothing I can Doohan

Posted by lemonie 9 years ago  |  last reply 8 years ago


How do i build a weatherproof, dust proof video projector enclosure with good airflow for use in a desert enviroment?

I'm going to be using a projector in the desert at night and need to build an enclosure for it. The enclosure will have to have a serious filtering system to keep blowing sand and dust out, it also will have to be able to block any rain that just might fall. While doing all that it must push alot of air out of the box to keep the projector cool enough. It does NOT need climate control because the desert gets really cool at night when ill be using this unit. Ideas?

Asked by 9 years ago  |  last reply 2 years ago


How do I separate gold from surrounding ores

I live near the site John Marshall discovered gold in 1848.  There is gold dust and particles everywhere!  Problem is that the gold is dust or fine powder form and the gold strongly adheres to it's surrounding ores.  Panning is tedious and not effective.  How can I separate the gold dust/powder from the other minerals?  I have heard using Auger Regis is effective, but cannot find anything on how to use it, purchase it, or make it myself.  Any suggestions/instructions on making or using auger regis; or any other more effective method of extracting the gold from the other minerals is greatly appreciated.

Posted by Ruthless0240 7 years ago  |  last reply 2 years ago