Looking for some ideas or for some advice for a dehydrator

Looking for some help Im not sure how to do the setup The materials I have.... -mini BBQ -small space heater please help maybe draw a sketch , the winner wins the first batch of beef jerky hahaha

Topic by lothar1511 7 years ago  |  last reply 7 years ago



Stuff to make with my dehydrator

I'm so excited about my new dehydrator, have made great nuts, persimmons, apples and tomatoes. I have one of the thingies to make fruit leather and can make jerky. I'd love to hear any instructablycreative ideas of what to make. If you're in the San Francisco area I might be willing to lend it out too!

Topic by susie 9 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


Where can I find other sources of heat for a dehydrator? Answered

I am in the process of planning a food dehydrator and i am wondering if you can get the heat needed to preserve meats~160F or 71C~ from a lightbulb(or two?)

Question by 1arrow24 10 years ago  |  last reply 8 years ago


How can I be safe when wiring up a 230v halogen bulb? Answered

Iam making a dehydrator and i want the high temperatures needed for preserving meats. If i use a 500w halogen bulb, how would i wire it up to the mains with a dimmer switch aswell?

Question by 1arrow24 10 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago


How can I dehydrate lime or lemon juice to make a powder?

I'm interested in using dried lime juice powder in place of citric acid powder for things like dusting fruit leather to make sour fruit candy.  Can't you just leave some juice out in a shallow pan in the sun and then powder the result in the blender? 

Question by corinroyal 8 years ago  |  last reply 2 years ago


How do I make beef jerky in the oven using ground beef ?

I want to make the beef jerky briefs however I don't have a dehydrator so I need directions for dehydrating the ground beef in the oven.

Question by TracyCheers 7 years ago  |  last reply 7 years ago


How tom make your own Yeast Flocks? (As food complement)

Is it simply liquid fermented dow dehydrated at low temperature?

Question by FeteLeToiMeme 7 years ago  |  last reply 7 years ago


How to "chew" a large amount chewing gum without actually chewing it

Hi, I want to chew a lot of chewing gum without actually doing the chewing myself (or inflicting that task on others) for an art project - can someone suggest how I could do this on a large scale? I don't know if I should put it in a blender, soak it or what? Also, I'm going to be making a half moulds which will be used to press the gum into, then I'll press the halves together. Is there a good way to harden the gum in a short amount of time? Would baking it work? Or does it need to be dehydrated? I have a dehydrator... Thanks for the advice.

Topic by jarris 6 years ago  |  last reply 6 years ago


Does anyone know how to dry a liquid to make a powder?

 I want to make stevia powder out of a concentrated stevia liquid? To store it longer and to use it in dry tea mixtures and so on.

Question by hugenott 7 years ago  |  last reply 1 year ago


Ears Popping While Running?

Whenever I run a 5k, I'm finding that my ears start to pop part way through. It makes everything louder, including my breathing, and is extremely distracting. One website mentioned dehydration as a factor, another said something about blood pressure...does anyone know about it? Thanks!

Topic by Weissensteinburg 10 years ago  |  last reply 7 years ago


Green Bean chips

A few days ago I had some Green Bean Chips from Wholefoods, and I would like to know how to recreate them. I tried to dehydrate and fry t\ them but they didn't turn out the way I wanted them too. Now I was wondering if anybody would have any other ideas THanks

Topic by milonus 11 years ago  |  last reply 11 years ago


Would isopropyl alcohol (rubbing alcohol) be too strong/"rough" to make perfume?

Would isopropyl alcohol (rubbing alcohol) be too strong/"rough" to make perfume? I don't know what the industry uses (suppose I should google THAT), and I'm worried that if I make a tincture by soaking flowers in it that the result would be too dehydrating or bad for the skin...?

Question by 9 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


Halogen Heater?

I stay in the northern area of India and have been using different types of heaters for warming a room. The one i feel s the most effective is halogen heater since they don't dehydrate the room like the others, but commercial heaters are ... how should I put this ??? SISSY ... they have only 2 - 3 halogen tubes and they don't heat the room fast enough. I planning to make one with 6 tubes. Any inputs ? any things i need to be careful about ??

Question by justdeepankar 7 years ago  |  last reply 7 years ago


EASY FAN SPEED CONTROLLER

I have a 12dc sever fan installed into and old fridge to be made into a jerky dehydrator. what i need is a simple TWO POWER WIRE IN and TWO FAN WIRES OUT speed controller as the fan empty's the air from the fridge in 2 seconds flat. what i need is a controller with three speeds and an OFF. i can make one very easily from a detailed schematic but please keep it simple

Topic by joypad 8 years ago  |  last reply 8 years ago


How can I obtain cheap geosmin-scented air freshener?

What's the cheapest (safe and legal) way to obtain a small quantity of relatively pure geosmin? By "small" I mean an amount sufficient to keep a room smelling like rich earth for weeks. By "relatively pure" I mean it won't turn funky or give someone a nasty case of fungal pneumonia. Brew it? I know dehydration and alkali could -help- isolate Streptomyces, but then what? I don't have access to ready-made selective media nor money to buy strange supplies.

Question by 10 years ago  |  last reply 4 years ago


Looking for Seville Orange Flavoured Coffee or the receipe?

I used to buy this coffee at Rafal's in Detroit (Leading spice importer) but it closed down and none of the local specialty grocery stores sell the coffee, Amazon lists the coffee but it is unobtainable at this time. I tried adding Kroger orange essence to generic run 'o' the mill coffee but it was weak (Even after adding the entire little bottle) and it had a "Candy" like flavour that was actually slightly sweet and not like the coffee which is slightly bitter. I have my trusty Ronco dehydrator and have considered looking for tart Florida oranges to dry and cut for use in the mix. I came up empty on a Yahoo and Google search and so hopefully someone has the smarts and knowledge to replicate the coffee. I prefer to make things myself over buying them but desperation is setting in and I will break down and buy coffee if I need to.

Question by Earlofmercia 8 years ago  |  last reply 8 years ago


Can you freeze dry food at home?

I would like to know how to freeze dry food. Could some create an Instructable How-To,... Can someone build a machine that freeze dry food? There are essentially three categories of freeze-dryers: the manifold freeze-dryer, the rotary freeze-dryer and the tray style freeze-dryer. Two components are common to all types of freeze-dryers: a vacuum pump to reduce the ambient gas pressure in a vessel containing the substance to be dried and a condenser to remove the moisture by condensation on a surface cooled to -40 to -80 C (-40 to -112 F). The manifold, rotary and tray type freeze-dryers differ in the method by which the dried substance is interfaced with a condenser. In manifold freeze-dryers a short usually circular tube is used to connect multiple containers with the dried product to a condenser. The rotary and tray freeze-dryers have a single large reservoir for the dried substance. Thank You

Topic by acomisp 7 years ago  |  last reply 7 years ago


Instructables Podcast 002: A Lot of Pressure, and a Sharp Tug

Welcome to our second episode! Would you like some advice on a project your working on? Perhaps you'd like a few ideas from a new source? You can comment here or email us at howdoi@instructables.com In this episode we discuss some of the projects we're working on, take care of some more housekeeping, and do a bit of brainstorming! Enjoy the episode and enjoy the resources! You can listen to or download the episode below, listen over at archive.org or check it out at our homepage: download Resources: From our Builds: -Learning Electronics: littleBits, Snap Circuits and LogicBlocks. -How to build a food dehydrator 3D Modeling: -Jake's instructable on building his action figure -Find 3D models: 123D, Thingiverse, Blender -Create 3D models: 123D, SketchUp Books and such: -Awesome Prop Building Forum -David J. Gingery: Build your own Metal Working Shop from Scratch -O'Reilly and Make -Kenn Amdahl: There Are No Electrons: Electronics For Earthlings Other: -Chainsaw bike Sharp Tugs: -Hammer on a revolver: From How Stuff Works, scroll down to "How Revolves Work" and click on the flash animation -Bass drum pedal -Rubber band gun -Mini Crossbow (thank you again How Stuff Works) Steam Power: -Steampunk Motorcycle -Very basic guide to steam engines -Tesla Turbine -Tea Pot Steam Engine (click on "How Steam Engines Work" for pdf) -Pop Pop Boat (also, I know what I'm getting Jake for his next birthday) If you'd like us to discuss one of your questions, please email us at howdoi@instructables.com or comment below.

Topic by StumpChunkman 6 years ago  |  last reply 6 years ago


(newsletter) 6 Cent Knife, Pirate Cannon Game, 3D Sewing...

Sep 11, 2008 Sign-up for this newsletter: function openSubscribePopUp(src){ var emailValidate = /\w{1,}[@][\w\-]{1,}([.]([\w\-]{1,})){1,3}$/ if(emailValidate.test(src.value) == false){ alert("Please enter correct email"); return; } window.open("/newsletter/newslettersignup?email=" + src.value,"newslettersignup1","status=yes,scrollbars=yes,resizable=yes,width=420,height=250"); } Welcome back! The Forbes Fabergé-Style Egg Contest has launched! Make an extravagantly decorated egg, win a cool prize, and get your egg featured in the Forbes Galleries in New York City! The Craft Skills Contest is well underway - learn a new skill, and submit your own! The winners of the Book Contest are posted! Go see the 75 winners that will be featured in the upcoming Instructables book! Live near San Francisco or planning a trip? Stop by for one of our build nights and make something cool in our office! September 18: Mouse mouse; October 2: Intro to Chainmail. RSVP required - just PM Canida.Upcoming... Get ready for the biggest and best Halloween contest ever! October will be here soon, so start working on an elaborate costume and creepy decorations! Don't forget, anything posted since the close of last year's contest is eligible. Repair columns that were built in 1861 by drewgrey Build Your Own Pedicab by liseman Recycle Laminate Floor Planks by mrsnap1 Hot Glue LED Diffusion by depotdevoid See all 75 Winners! Make a Steampunk Headset by garagemonkeysan Sew a perfect 3-D corner on a cube by mdhaworth Make a Passive Network Tap by joe Make a 6 cent Pocket Knife by iMac LED tilt light box by seligtobiason Pirate Ship and Cannon Game by rickgyver Simple Sonotube Food Dehydrator by stringstretcher Weave medieval cords for bracelets by Kiteman 10 Great Lamp Instructablesto Light Up Your Life Build a Little Row Boat with Plywood by Pornostache Simple Paper Flowers by Poe-tate-o Make a Book Lamp by Goombex SuperSquid - battery charger splitter by eBu Now go make something awesome, and I'll see you next week! - Eric Sign-up for this newsletter: function openSubscribePopUp(src){ var emailValidate = /\w{1,}[@][\w\-]{1,}([.]([\w\-]{1,})){1,3}$/ if(emailValidate.test(src.value) == false){ alert("Please enter correct email"); return; } window.open("/newsletter/newslettersignup?email=" + src.value,"newslettersignup2","status=yes,scrollbars=yes,resizable=yes,width=420,height=250"); }

Topic by fungus amungus 10 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago


Japan Day 3

Woke up and took a shower. The French couple had left, so it was just Changmi, the Czech couple, and me at the house.I had read the day before that any foreign credit/debit cards will only work at the post office, so that was my first destination this morning. I found what I thought was the nearest post office online, and headed over. My debit card worked, so I took out enough money to last me for a while.Got back to the house, and then went out with Changmi to pick up her friend. On the way to her friends house we stopped off to get some rice balls (onigiri), I picked up a watch at a 99 yen store, and she bought an ice cream bar. After picking up her friend, we all headed back to her house, and she told me they would be filming for a bit, so I headed downtown. I had learned from the Czech couple, that a building in Nagoya Station has a free observation deck, so for the second time I made that my destination. I got to the station, rode up 14 flights of escalators, and took a bunch of pictures.After that I headed over to the osu temple where a local radio station had set up a concert / fair. I stopped to listen to the music for a bit before I checked out an even larger open air market than the one I had seen the day before. After walking around for about an hour or so, I headed back.Back at the house I relaxed in bed for a bit, before Changmi, the Czech dude, and I went to one of her friends bars. Her friends who own the bar have their own band, so we listened to some of their music, the Czech dude played some guitar, we all had some beers, and headed back.*Random note - It is so hot and humid, I decided not to bike around between the cities, because my dehydrated body would be found on the side of the road somewhere. That and the fact that I can get a local (read: non-shinkansen) train to Kyoto for only 25$. Sweet deal.*Random note 2 - They sell fireworks in 7 eleven. How awesome is that.Video of one of the acts at the concert / fair at the temple.

Topic by Tetranitrate 10 years ago


Build a Catapult, Mario Wii, Make a Knife...

Sign-up for our newsletter here. Mar. 13, 2008 Mouse Mouse is missing! While we were at SXSW someone walked off with our dear little mouse mouse from our display table. If you have any information, please let us know! No kidding, only one was made and we'd like to get him back. OK, back to the regular Instructables news... Today we are launching the Pocket-Sized speed contest. Make something cool that fits into a regular pocket, then enter it to win some sweet prizes! This is the last weekend for the Toss It! paper airplane speed contest. Enter your favorite paper airplane design and win an Air Instructables Pilot's License. The winners for the Anti-Yo Worldwide Video Yoyo Contest have been announced. See the video that won the $350 yoyo! Check out these cool instructables! How to build your first robot Use this walkthrough to make an autonomous, self-exploring, "own-mind" robot in a few hours! posted by fritsl on Mar 12, 2007 How To Make Delicious Scrambled Eggs A simple and quick recipe for great tasting scrambled eggs! posted by Brennn10 on Mar 9, 2008 Industrial Picture Frame Make industrial-style metal picture frames without spending loads of cash. posted by mada on Mar 6, 2008 Super Mario Bros Inspired Wii with USB base Decorate your Wii with some old-school graphics, and give it a couple of cool add-ons in the process. posted by BeerBellyJoe on Mar 9, 2008 How To Build A Catapult Launch stuff 100 yards with your very own siege weapon. posted by T3h_Muffinator on Mar 12, 2008 How to pill a cat, the easy way. When you need to give your cat some medicine you might need to be a little creative to get her to take it. posted by sunitgir on Mar 7, 2008 Pocket-Sized Speed Contest One trick ruledthem all What do you do for your pet? How To Teach Your Dog Some Important Tricks (And Some Not So Important Ones) Learn some basics of teaching your dog a couple new tricks. posted by Gjdj3 on Mar 10, 2008 How To Make an Applique! Jazz up an old piece of clothing with a funky bit of fabric to give it a whole new life, and live in style! posted by threadbanger on Mar 6, 2008 The 10 Minute Laptop Stand A quick trip to the hardware store + a little bit of work = your own laptop stand. posted by johnbot on Mar 9, 2008 How to Build a Knife Making a knife isn't easy, but this guide will get you started on the skills you'll need to make one yourself. posted by Basta on Feb 26, 2008 AC White LED Circular Magnifier Work Lamp Use bright LEDs to replace fluorescent circular light in magnifier work lamp.Let there be light! posted by arcticpenguin on Mar 11, 2008 How to "Salt Out" Salting out is a process that can be used to dehydrate Isopropyl alcohol, i.e., separate it from water in an azeotropic solution. posted by thinkahead on Mar 3, 2008   Now go make something awesome, and I'll see you next week! - Eric

Topic by fungus amungus 11 years ago


Grow Our Own!- the big idea

Hey there Makers and Instructors! It's me, Maxwell and I have an idea to help feed people collaboratively, and I would like some advice on how to establish a collaborative barter network of people who want to or do grow food(mostly vegetables,herbs, and fruit,or even canned varieties for those who preserve) I call it Grow Our Own, or Let's Live! Participants would barter fruits, vegetables, herbs, seeds, plants, etc, and a climate of information,instruction,and encouragement. This might take place at either gatherings on weekends in specific places, personal meetings, or through a distribution system I haven't figured out yet.(advice?) There would be a system to enhance diversity, as well,so you wouldn't just end up with an enormous beefsteak tomato glut,( kind of a grow what you want, but please if there's space a little of this?) Ideally, this would increase nutrition, oxygen, biodiversity, provide useful growing information to a hungry somewhat ignorant populace , promote responsible water and waste use ,and bypass at least some economic cycle problems. I want to establish a network of smaller more local groups to also encourage people to propagate fruit, herbs, and vegetables,(especially heirloom varieties) and to instruct and engender a system of distribution and instruction. I definitely think composting is a strong part of this. I also think that trying to find unused spaces and getting permission to grow on them might help grow abundance, as long as vandalism can be avoided.Admittedly over my head. I would also like to encourage this for partial-subsistence growing in urban areas. I feel each apartment building roof, balcony and courtyard that can hold even transient plant life should be split between solar power, raingathering, and semisubsistance food growing. If this is done collaboratively, it will begin to snowball and will become more common.This would effectively improve life for some poorer people with less nutritional access due to economic factors. (If the fast food industry served actually nutritious food at it's locations at the prices it has gummed up America's vascular systems and organs, it would be one of the most effective nutritive food distribution systems in the world, instead of the casually despotic mutilator of bodies it is.(bovine AND primate) That may have sounded harsh, and I apologize if your love of a Double Supersize Mc Twinky Burger supersedes your desire to survive, that's your choice and I respect it, I was making an example, not inviting the hate. Houses with arable land now foolishly wasting water on lawns should be growing food. This not only could increase air quality and continue to localize moisture, but could reduce economic burden on many families, and therefore incrementally reduce municipal strain. This also can help mitigate graywater and reduce system load and waste. We have gotten too used to the system of aloof receivership in our modern societies. We must relearn to grow our own food, make our own things, understand the processes that keep us alive on Earth. I know you understand. Linear systems are unrealistic in a universe of cycles, let alone a world of cycles. We can live better by working together, because that's how the planet works. Sympathetic and Symbiotic processes naturally facilitate unity and if we work with what of the Earth we haven't paved over, or create more space to grow food in, we may counteract some of the damage we have done and stop so much waste. We may even teach people to eat more nutritiously, I'll bet. We must reteach ourselves to seek knowledge and wisdom rather than solace and escape, teach our children the ways of responsible stewardship of sustenance and comfort. I am going to put together what I can of the idea into a simple website soon. I want to reach people with that message, though I don't know if I am much of a frontman.So let's do it together. If we work together we can help each other survive better. Isn't that what's really important? Thank you for any advice, oh yes, and please don't assume I am Omniscient Superfarmer, I'm trying to learn too, any useful information will be appreciated! Let's Live! Cheers and Hope, have a great day! Maxwell (btw,I've already sent this, somewhat paraphrased in email form to: The Buckminster Fuller Institute.org, Pathtofreedom.org, The We Campaign, The Theodor Payne Foundation and many others, but any suggestions? You also may send it to whoever you think may help.) I admit I'm excited!

Topic by Subconscionaut 10 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago


Technology Makes Cheap Drinking Water from Air

INTRODUCTION:   How can we best apply basic technology to help the underprivileged and/or disaster-hit countries like Haiti? Daily hygiene and nourishment are among the top needs for disaster ridden regions!  Simply put, no water means no hygiene. The Romans understood that over two millennia ago and created their complexly beautiful aqueduct networks for handling both fresh and wastewater! Other ingenious water systems like “air wells” have been found in the city of Theodosia (cf: discovered in 1900 by Zibold, see Zibold’s Collectors/Dehumidifiers) dating back to Greco-Roman times during the Byzantine Empire. These were strictly passive systems that naturally dehumidified air, collecting its potable water in underground basins. All air, even in relatively dry desert regions, will precipitate or release its natural water content (initially in the form of vapor) through condensation when it hits its dew-point temperature and below. That means you “chill” it to an appropriate level that is anywhere from 5F to 50F below its current air temperature, depending upon how much water content (relative humidity) it has locally absorbed. The condensation of the water vapor releases its internal latent heat (reheating the cooled air) which must be constantly dissipated (absorbed by something) in order for water formation to steadily continue. So how do we dissipate this resultant vapor-heat and chill our air without any infrastructure or electricity, in an underprivileged or disaster-ridden region? We simply bury a long cast-iron or any metallic drain-pipe sufficiently underground where the temperature of the earth is naturally held to a constant at around 45F to 55F. That’s our “free” chiller gift from nature. One end of the pipe, Figure-1,  sticks out of the ground to suck-in local outside hot air, and the other end dumps cooled dry air and water into an underground cistern where it gets collected and is piped to the surface to both exhaust the cooled dry air and connect to a water pump. We need a hand operated water pump to lift up the water above ground, and we need an electric fan to constantly pump air through the ground-chilled piping system. We can even force the cooled piped air to exhaust into a tent-like structure where it provides air conditioning as an added bonus, but this adds the penalty of both power and the increased fan size necessary to drive our required airflow further into an enclosure! While this concept is not “passive” (requiring electricity to work) like those clever Byzantine air-wells, it will produce much more potable water and within a smaller volume than those elegantly passive historic devices. The electricity for our fan power requirements can be produced by any one of four ways using either “active” or “passive” techniques: 1) An active playground or bike-pedaling-person or oxen-driven mechanism-generator, 2) A passive windmill generator, 3) A passive solar energy collection system that directly generates electricity, or 4) A passive thermo-electric system that directly generates electricity using the Peltier effect, operating solely on temperature differences between the cell’s top and bottom surface (we jury-rig the cool pipe and hot ambient air to contact separate sides of the cell). Depending upon how much water is needed, the required air volume plus pipe length and diameter, together with the fan will be sized accordingly. We can also configure groups of parallel fan-driven air pipes that are radially fed into the cistern. The sizing of this underground network depends upon the ambient air’s local average temperature and relative humidity (how much water gets absorbed into the air) plus buried pipe depth and effective underground temperatures achieved. The basic concept is one where we “wring” water from air at some given humidity content. The higher its relative humidity the more water is recovered from the air. The air-wringing process simply chills the air as it scrubs along the cooled internal pipe surface until it starts to rain inside the pipe from condensation onto its surface. The condensation is like the dew that forms on car windows, grass or any cooled surface in the early morning, before the sun comes out and evaporates the dew back into the heating air. A further bonus is that our dew-formed water is naturally distilled and very clean. It is potable water ready to drink without the need for additional sterilizing agents. Of course, we must make sure that the interior piping and cistern network is biologically cleansed before burying it underground. The hand pump with its 10 to 15 foot extended piping to reach the underground cistern must also be cleansed. The beauty of this constantly replenishable water supply is its convenient underground installation anywhere! After the in-ground installation, we have a virtual, partially passive, no moving parts, non-breakdown system containing above ground total access to all moving parts that could breakdown, namely the water pump and electric fan. Also, it is easily maintained, with few moving parts (water hand-pump and electric fan) and basically lacking any technical complexity which makes it ideal for technologically backward regions. The example below uses a relatively small industrial fan moving air at 1500 CFM (Cubic Feet per Minute) with a DC motor rated at 1kW. This fan together with our underground piping system will conservatively generate 12 GPH (Gallons Per Hour) of potable drinking water without need for any purification chemistry. Based on an average electrical cost of 14-cents per kWh (kilo-Watt hour), the typical commercial distillation of one gallon of drinking water costs roughly 35-cents as compared to our cost of only 1.2-cents. Furthermore, if we decide to go green and use solar energy for generating our water, it would effectively cost us nothing beyond the initial installation! USING A PSYCHROMETRIC CHART TO SIZE OUR WATER SUPPLY: The following gets a little technical and is only provided for those die-hards who are truly interested in how the science works. Those non-technically schooled may skip this part and not miss the basic concept. Figure-2 shows a Psychrometric Chart for air. This chart summarizes some of the basic thermodynamic properties of air throughout its typical range of operating temperature. The chart uses six basic air properties that defines the physical chemistry of water evaporation into air:  (1) the enthalpy or total energy contained within a unit of air which is a combination of its internal and external energy, expressed as the amount of BTU-energy per unit mass of reference dry-air, (2) the specific volume or the ratio of a unit volume of local air to its mass of reference dry-air, (3) the humidity ratio or the amount (mass) of moisture in a local unit of air divided by its reference mass of dry-air, (4) the percent relative humidity per unit of local air, or the mass ratio (expressed in percentage form) of the partial pressure of water vapor in the air-water mixture to the saturated vapor pressure of water at those conditions (the relative humidity depends not only on air temperature but also on the pressure of the system of interest),  (5) the dry-bulb temperature or the locally measured air temperature, and (6) the wet-bulb temperature or saturation temperature which is the local air temperature experienced during constant water evaporation (a wet-bulb thermometer is typically used:   a thermometer that measures resultant temperature while wrapped in a water wet-gauze and spun to generate local air movement and max-evaporation)  1.0   The Process and A Sample Calculation Our Psychrometric Chart uses six thermodynamic properties that help to determine the amount of water available for extraction from the local ambient air as a function of its temperature, pressure and relative humidity.  Let’s assume the following local ambient conditions for the region we plan to construct our water system at:  (1) Typical daily air temperature Td = 106F and one atmosphere pressure assumed at sea-level, (2) Relative Humidity, RH = 55%, and (3) Typical underground temperature down at six feet is measured at Tu=55F (at 12ft. it drops to ~45F). This yields the following calculated results for obtaining a steady-state supply (changes at night) of water to fill the cistern:      1)      In our example, the “local” air (dry-bulb) temperature is Td=106F, at a relative humidity of RH= 55%.  Fig-2 indicates that the resultant Humidity Ratio is HR= 0.0253 Lbs-water/Lb-Dry-Air (intersection of Td=106F line and RH=55% line, then horizontal to HR value).  We then determine the “gulp” of air volume containing the HR Lbs-water which corresponds to the point of intersection of Td and RH. Interpolating on specific volume “mv” yields mv=14.7 ft3/Lb-Dry-Air (this value sets the optimum unit airflow for our given ambient conditions, and creates a ballpark pipe length to diameter ratio needed later). It represents the basic unit of air volume that will enter our underground pipe per given time, and ultimately defines the size of our fan and piping network. For increased water creation, multiples of this unit volume will scale up the additional amounts of water that can be collected. 2)      As the inlet air cools down to a temperature of Tu=55F, from contact with the relatively cold underground pipe, we follow the constant enthalpy line (red upward left-diagonal) from the intersection of Td and RH to its saturated air temperature condition of Ts= ~88F, which is its dew-point temperature where the corresponding local RH=100%.  At this temperature or under, the air precipitates and releases its moisture content, resulting in water condensation onto the pipe walls.  Since our air will chill to a final pipe temperature of Tu=~55F, we follow the RH=100% saturated curve (green) down to yield an HR=~0.009 Lbs-water/Lb-Dry-Air. This is how much water is left in the air when it gets to 55F.  Therefore for every pound of local outside air that enters the pipe, mw=0.0253 – 0.009 = 0.0163 pounds of absolute pure, distilled potable water precipitates onto the inside pipe wall (per pound of dry air that is cooled and dehydrated) to gravity-flow out the pipe exit and into the cistern. 3)      We now convert pounds of air per unit time into a unitized volumetric airflow that yields gallons of hygienically pure potable water production per unit time. For every Va=100 ft3 of local volumetric air movement per minute (CFM) through the pipe, which translates into ma=Va/mv= 100/14.7 = 6.8 lbs. of dry air per minute or 6.8 * 60 = 408 lbs. per hour (PPH), to yield a water-flow of mwf=ma * mw = 408 * 0.0163 = 6.65 PPH or 6.65/8.345 = 0.8 GPH of water.  An industrial fan rated at 1kW DC will typically move 1500 CFM at a pressure of 8-iwc, to continuously produce 15 * 0.8 = 12 GPH of pristine potable water. 4)      Not shown here are the design details of sizing our pipe, fan and solar collection system for electric power requirements using heat transfer principles coupled with a thermodynamic heat balance, and aerodynamic fan performance assessment. These details help to size the electric power generation requirements plus margin used to properly size a solar collector containing further margins for overcast days. The engineering involved here is straight forward but beyond the scope of the current project.

Topic by RT-101 7 years ago  |  last reply 1 year ago