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Can anyone Identify this IR Receiver Component? Answered

Hi,
I have been doing some desoldering to get hold of components and I have got myself the IR Receiver pictured. This is labelled as the annotations show, 4524C, M and C, and on the reverse says F2. This component was taken from a water damaged Canon MVX30i, but I would like a datasheet for the component found. Can anyone help me find a datasheet for this, or suggest what the four connections would be?
Thanks,
AMouse197


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Jack A Lopez

7 years ago

It looks like an IR receiver module, like those for receiving signals from an IR remote control, but I have no idea why a camera would have one, unless that camera comes with an IR remote.

Usually these IR receiver modules have three pins, for +5V, ground, and signal out.

At this link
http://www.goldmine-elec-products.com/products.asp?dept=1364
you can see an assortment of pictures of these IR modules, examples of what they usually look like.

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anonymouse197Jack A Lopez

Answer 7 years ago

Thanks Jack!
I think the camera just has one for Remote Controlled shutter etc.
However, what would the 4 connections be for, I understand the usual 3, but why 4?

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Jack A Lopezanonymouse197

Answer 7 years ago

It maybe has four just because they put a pad on each corner. It could be the case that only three of those pads are connected to anything. Or alternatively, two of them are connected to each other. So again, it's just three. The reason for putting four pads there might be the same reason for putting four wheels on a car. It's more mechanically stable that way.

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anonymouse197Jack A Lopez

Answer 7 years ago

Ah great, I will check that out with my multimeter when I get back. If that is the case, is there any way that I can determine which pad is which?

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Jack A Lopezanonymouse197

Answer 7 years ago

Since I can't seem to find a datasheet (I tried www.alldatasheet.com, and also Google), I think the way to figure it out is to put it back in its original context.  I mean examine the camera you took it out of.  See if two of those wires find their way back to the battery supply of the camera.

Also reading what Lemonie wrote about observing one of those actually emitting IR, I am now thinking it might be some kind of IR-proximity sensor, like this one:

http://www.societyofrobots.com/sensors_sharpirrange.shtml

http://www.sparkfun.com/products/242

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lemonieJack A Lopez

Answer 7 years ago

It's for auto-focus. I've seen this "invisible light" reflected in windows on video-footage (the camera "sees" but the eyes don't). I don't know how it works though.

L

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anonymouse197lemonie

Answer 7 years ago

Now thats something I hadn't thought about, very clever. I assume it would still be useable for remote control purposes if I was to hook it up to a microcontroller though?

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lemonieanonymouse197

Answer 7 years ago

Well, yes but I don't know how the device works. I'll guess that you've got 2x power terminals and 2x signal, but that's a guess.

L

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anonymouse197

7 years ago

The annotations get a little displaced on my browser, just re-click the thumbnail to put things right.

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icenganonymouse197

Answer 7 years ago

Happens to me too,
if you ever find out ho to fix it post it in the Forums under burning question.

A