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Is there a permittivity and permeability table of the elements? Answered


I've found permittivity and permeability tables of the common metals, but none with all the elements. I know they measure them.

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kelseymh

Best Answer 7 years ago

I don't think you're going to find such a complete table. First, not all elements will have had those properties measured; and second, they are strongly frequency and temperature dependent. The latter means that you'll either get a table for a fixed frequency and environment, or else you'll get a massive collection of phase-space plots from which you have to extract the data you want.

See, for example, reference 9 from the Wikipedia page Rick cited.

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Vorenuskelseymh

Answer 7 years ago

Is there a site with the tables and phase-space plots? I'm interested in rearranging the data to study the relationships.

This is the really fascinating area, for me. My Senior year of college, I would have said Ohm's Law was always accurate. Now I know that the current-voltage relationship isn't always linear, dependent on the material. We just do a really fantastic job of creating components, out of all the right materials, that behave linearly. It's fantastic if we want the same results we've been getting; but there is so much more.

I'm glad I started off in EE, but materials is where all the fun happens.

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kelseymhVorenus

Answer 7 years ago

Okay, a Google search for "tables of permittivity" got me http://www.kayelaby.npl.co.uk/general_physics/2_6/2_6_5.html, which is relatively comprehensive. I'll leave subsequent searches to you.

One comment -- very few really useful electronic components are linear. Transistors are not, nor are diodes. An op-amp is decidedly nonlinear away from zero (in fact, you can use them to build perceptron-style neural nets). As you've gathered, the nonlinear properties of materials (and metamaterials) are an active and exciting area of current research in condensed matter physics.

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Vorenuskelseymh

Answer 7 years ago

Thank you. I'll continue the search. I really thought NIST would have a collection.

You're right. I probably could have phrased that more appropriately. I've had to take "electronic and photonic devices" like everyone else in school; so I know about their characteristics. Hysteresis is neat. But there are at least 3 guys who were trying to create a component with a negative current-voltage relationship in the 20's. They failed, from what I've read about so far, but they created some interesting stuff. And they always talk about using pure river water. :-) I'd love to know their setup for creating a vacuum inside a glass tube.

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kelseymhVorenus

Answer 7 years ago

I don't know of an online site with that kind of data. You will probably need to either find published references, or do a Google Scholar search to figure out which research groups are active in this area.

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rickharris

7 years ago

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Permeability_%28electromagnetism%29

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Vorenusrickharris

Answer 7 years ago

Thank you. That table did have 2 more elements I haven't found. I'm looking for a table of the permeabilities and permittivities of all the elements. I've been scouring the internet for the last couple of days, but I'm no computer scientist.